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  • T2b11

    I recently received my mtFull results indicating a haplogroup designation of T2b11. I am having a hard time finding extensive information on this haplogroup. Can anybody link me to info on the age and origin of T2b11?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by CDH View Post
    I recently received my mtFull results indicating a haplogroup designation of T2b11. I am having a hard time finding extensive information on this haplogroup. Can anybody link me to info on the age and origin of T2b11?

    Thanks!
    I don't think there is much/any info on the subclades, especially a recently identified one (according to Wikipedia, as of 2012, only 6 subclades of T2b had been identified, so T2b11 must be fairly recent). Someone stop me if I'm wrong but I believe all it means is there's enough people with the same mutation to T2b to make it an official subclade, it doesn't necessarily mean they have any info on origins/age/migration of it beyond what it known about the parent group of T or T2b.

    Here's some info on T2b: http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread973315/pg1 - take some of it with a grain of salt because the author seems to be trying to connect T2b with the Bible. But it does say T2b originates in Syria, and migrated to Italy. You might find more info on T2b in Brian Sykes book Seven Daughters of Eve, but it probably doesn't discuss T2b11.

    Edit: Actually, I just found this: http://haplogroup.org/mtdna/rsrs/l12...2b/t2b1/t2b11/
    Which says: "Haplogroup T2b11 is a branch on the maternal tree of human kind. Its age is between 200 and 5,700 years (Behar et al., 2012b)."
    Last edited by Germanica; 24th March 2017, 11:48 AM.

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    • #3
      Eupedia has a page for mt haplogroup T. The subclade T2b11 is mentioned in one section ("found in the North Caucasus"):
      For many mt-haplogroups it is relatively easy to distinguish subclades that were dispersed by the Indo-European migrations during the Bronze Age by looking at the European mtDNA lineages found in Siberia, Central Asia and South Asia, regions that have been settled by the Indo-Europeans during the Bronze Age. The problem with haplogroup T is that all of the top subclades found in Europe (T1a, T2b, T2c, T2e) are also found in these regions. The phylogeny of haplogroup T2 being so complex, in particular downstream of T2b, higher resolution tests are required to identify which deep clades could be of Indo-European origins. Data from outside Europe is still sparse, but among the deeper subclades identified in Central/South Asia were T2b2 (in Turkmenistan, Iran and India), T2b4 (in Uzbekistan), T2b11 (found in the North Caucasus) and T2b16 (found in the Volga-Ural and Kazakhstan). Note that T2b2 and T2b4 happen to be the same subclades as those recovered from Corded Ware remains. As a result, there are high chances that these two subclades were found among the Bronze Age Proto-Indo-Europeans, particularly with Y-haplogroup R1a (associated with the Balto-Slavic and Indo-Iranian branches).
      The "Subclades" tree on that page shows "T2b11: found in Europe and the North Caucasus."

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      • #4
        Very interesting reading (and somewhat over my head), thanks!

        So I was thinking since it was found in the North Caucasus and my maternal paper trail points to Sweden, it might be part of what Ancient Origins classifies as "Metal Age Invaders". On the other hand, if I look at the map in one of the links, some of the darkest (highest dist) areas are Italy, Sardinia and Spain. Granted that is for T2, not far downstream like T2b11.

        Anyway, I'll keep reading and maybe I'll learn more.

        Regards

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        • #5
          Wow, very interesting! I haven't done a mtfull but my mtDNA is T2b. My maternal line so far has proven to be Prussian (they cane to the US between 1880 and 1905) and Eastern European in orgin, so this makes sense for me.

          I'll have to break the news to my mom though that we probably have some Russian in our line. Our unofficial family motto has always been "Never Trust A Russian".

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          • #6
            Never trust a Norwegian

            Originally posted by vickytoria View Post
            Wow, very interesting! I haven't done a mtfull but my mtDNA is T2b. My maternal line so far has proven to be Prussian (they cane to the US between 1880 and 1905) and Eastern European in orgin, so this makes sense for me.

            I'll have to break the news to my mom though that we probably have some Russian in our line. Our unofficial family motto has always been "Never Trust A Russian".
            I am T2B11 German, Dutch, Scottish, English on my mother's side.

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