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Maternal DNA from Ancestry

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  • Maternal DNA from Ancestry

    A few years ago I had my great uncle tested on his maternal DNA at ancestry. At the time this test was close to $300. I was trying to determine if his mother was from Native American descent. The answer to that was no because he came back as a Haplogroup H. I have attached what ancestry had on his results. He died shortly after this and he was my only chance that I know of to test this line. Can anyone enlighten me to what the letters and numbers in the attachment mean?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Let me explain using a quote from FTDNA literature (page 4 of https://www.familytreedna.com/PDF/mtDNAFull_Report.pdf)
    Mutations: MtDNA results are commonly compared to the CRS, the industry standard which was sequenced in 1981. Any place in your mtDNA where you have a difference from the CRS is characterized as a mutation. If your results show no mutations at all it means you match the CRS. A mutation happens when one base is replaced by a different base, when a base is inserted between two bases without replacing any, or when a base is removed from a position without being replaced.

    These mutations are listed on your certificate. The letters represent the new code found at that place in the sequence. A “C” in position 16154, for example, means that at the 16154th base pair, you have a “C” in place of the “T” listed for that position in the CRS. A position like this that shows variation is called a polymorphism, or mutation.

    In most mutations, the base pair switches only with its partner. For example, A always partners with T, and G always partners with C. Mutations that switch in this manner (from A to T or G to C or vice versa) are indicated with a capital letter next to the number of the base pair where the mutation occurred.

    You may see insertions in your mtDNA sequence. If you have an insertion after base pair 255, for example, the insertion will be listed as the base pair and .1C. In this case, a single base pair insertion has been found in your mtDNA string, noted by the .1. The nucleotide changed to cytosine (C) from guanine (G), therefore denoted with a C. The insertion then looks like this: 255.1C. If you have a two base pair insertion the results might look like this: 255.1C 255.2T
    You have three polymorphisms: 152C, 263G, and 16519C

    You have one insertion: 315.1C

    Answers to the questions you did not ask
    • FTDNA no longer widely distributes mtDNAFull_Report.pdf. One of the arguments could be that FTDNA now moved from CRS to RSRS (Reconstructed Sapiens Reference Sequence).
    • The Cambridge Reference Sequence (CRS) is described for example in http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Cambridge_Reference_Sequence
    • In what you are likely to read (including my post!), when somebody writes CRS, they use it as a shorthand for rCRS.
    • You tested at Ancestry, and they offered only one type of mtDNA test which sequenced hypervariable regions 1 and 2 (HVR2 bases 1-390 and HVR1 bases 16000-16569). That is less what a HVR1&HVR2 test would cover at FTDNA, since at FTDNA HVR2 test includes bases 1-574. Also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypervariable_region


    Enjoy!

    W. (Mr.)

    P.S.
    If anyone knows where in the Family Tree DNA Learning Center the above information is located, please share...
    Last edited by dna; 17 June 2015, 10:31 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by LarryBurford View Post
      A few years ago I had my great uncle tested on his maternal DNA at ancestry. At the time this test was close to $300. I was trying to determine if his mother was from Native American descent. The answer to that was no because he came back as a Haplogroup H. I have attached what ancestry had on his results. He died shortly after this and he was my only chance that I know of to test this line. Can anyone enlighten me to what the letters and numbers in the attachment mean?
      mtDNA is only a matrilineal line of ancestry of your great uncle.

      Ten generations ago he had 1024 ancestors (maybe less, not important at this moment), and only one of them is traceable by mtDNA.

      Ten generations ago could be somewhere from 250 to 330 years ago. At that time, one of his ancestors was a European woman, the remaining 1023 could be from anywhere in the world (including all of them being Amerindian), and that would not change his mtDNA.

      W. (Mr.)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dna View Post
        mtDNA is only a matrilineal line of ancestry of your great uncle.

        Ten generations ago he had 1024 ancestors (maybe less, not important at this moment), and only one of them is traceable by mtDNA.

        Ten generations ago could be somewhere from 250 to 330 years ago. At that time, one of his ancestors was a European woman, the remaining 1023 could be from anywhere in the world (including all of them being Amerindian), and that would not change his mtDNA.

        W. (Mr.)
        Ok, Here is my story. It's just like the one 99% of the other people in the south tell. " Your part Indian" is what we always heard from my great Grandmother. In my case I have a photo of my 3x Great Grand mother Sarah ? from Limestone County Alabama. She married my 3x Great Grandfather Fulker Cox and had one child a girl named Mollie. Mollie had a daughter named Rosa who was my Great Uncle that I tested mother. The photo of Sarah ( the suspected native American or part native American) looks like she is for sure part Indian to me. I was just sure of it until I did the mtDNA test on Ancestry on my great Uncle. When it came back a haplogroup H I thought that that proved that the maternal line was European and not native American.Is this not true? I have had myself, my mother, her two sisters and her brother tested on the Ancestry autosomal test and nobody shows up as having any Native American in them.

        Larry

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LarryBurford View Post
          Ok, Here is my story. It's just like the one 99% of the other people in the south tell. " Your part Indian" is what we always heard from my great Grandmother. In my case I have a photo of my 3x Great Grand mother Sarah ? from Limestone County Alabama. She married my 3x Great Grandfather Fulker Cox and had one child a girl named Mollie. Mollie had a daughter named Rosa who was my Great Uncle that I tested mother. The photo of Sarah ( the suspected native American or part native American) looks like she is for sure part Indian to me. I was just sure of it until I did the mtDNA test on Ancestry on my great Uncle. When it came back a haplogroup H I thought that that proved that the maternal line was European and not native American.Is this not true? I have had myself, my mother, her two sisters and her brother tested on the Ancestry autosomal test and nobody shows up as having any Native American in them.

          Larry
          Sarah could have been 1/4, 2/4 or 3/4 Indian, and have a European maternal grandmother.

          Looks can be deceiving, just watch CNN about Rachel Dolezal

          It is being suggested in this forum that 23andMe autosomal testing is the best for discovering Amerindian heritage.

          W. (Mr.)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dna View Post
            Sarah could have been 1/4, 2/4 or 3/4 Indian, and have a European maternal grandmother.

            Looks can be deceiving, just watch CNN about Rachel Dolezal

            It is being suggested in this forum that 23andMe autosomal testing is the best for discovering Amerindian heritage.

            W. (Mr.)

            LOL about that Rachel Dolezal mess. I thought I had heard it all.

            I had thought about Sarah being part Indian on her fathers side but I figured that was highly unlikely since it was mostly white men getting with the Indian women. It's is still possible I guess. My G Grandmother said her grandmother Sarah was part Indian so I don't know how much "part" means. I attached a photo of her. She was born in 1838 in Limestone Co. Alabama. Her father was John Grindle and the mother is unknown. The photo was taken in 1879 when she was 41. She looks rough for 41 but times were rough then.

            Larry
            Attached Files

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