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V(C72T) origins?

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  • Darren
    replied
    I would also add that the large majority of the SNPs ending with the exclamation mark will be in either the HVR1 or HVR2 region, so they would be considered more volatile. There are some in the coding region though as well.

    -Darren

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  • dna
    replied
    @jtoml3

    If you wanted a nice name for your haplogroup, then that may never happen, as the mtDNA phylotree appears to be unmanageable using the old ways (anymore).

    Thus people are getting their haplogroups named SINGLE_LETTERDEFINING_MUTATION

    W. (Mr.)

    P.S.
    It is not always a single letter, as there are main branches like HV that have two letters etc.
    Last edited by dna; 18 March 2015, 04:47 PM.

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  • jtoml3
    replied
    Originally posted by DWFlineage View Post
    I see you did the mitochondrial plus testing. I did that testing at first, which showed only that I was in the V haplogroup. You have to do the full sequencing test, which would be an upgrade for you, but that will reveal your actuall subgroup.

    As I stated in earlier post, the full sequencing test also revealed two immature mutations that I have. The full sequencing test will narrow down your matches to the closest, and will show steps like step 1,2,3 for example.

    Best regards, Doug
    If you read down a bit further you would have seen I upgraded to the FMS test as I initially was just V with mtDNA Plus and wanted to know more.

    This would probably better help explain it.

    Last edited by jtoml3; 18 March 2015, 04:01 PM.

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  • DWFlineage
    replied
    Full sequencing

    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    You're lucky, I'm not even in a subgroup. I have about 11 people on my matches list with the same haplogroup "mutation". I assume it isn't common and hasn't been defined into a subclade yet? No one knows anything about it.

    I see you did the mitochondrial plus testing. I did that testing at first, which showed only that I was in the V haplogroup. You have to do the full sequencing test, which would be an upgrade for you, but that will reveal your actuall subgroup.

    As I stated in earlier post, the full sequencing test also revealed two immature mutations that I have. The full sequencing test will narrow down your matches to the closest, and will show steps like step 1,2,3 for example.

    Best regards, Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • jtoml3
    replied
    You're lucky, I'm not even in a subgroup. I have about 11 people on my matches list with the same haplogroup "mutation". I assume it isn't common and hasn't been defined into a subclade yet? No one knows anything about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • DWFlineage
    replied
    Correction

    Originally posted by DWFlineage View Post
    I have that C72T mutation also. I am in the V19 subgroup. I also have two heteroplasmies, which is the difference I have with my two closest matches, who match me perfectly except for the two heteroplasmies that I have.

    Best regards, Doug
    Actually I have the C72C not C72T mutation I think? I have a few other things going on, so I missed the distinction, but I am designated as V19 subgroup.

    Best regards, Doug

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  • DWFlineage
    replied
    C72T

    I have that C72T mutation also. I am in the V19 subgroup. I also have two heteroplasmies, which is the difference I have with my two closest matches, who match me perfectly except for the two heteroplasmies that I have.

    Best regards, Doug

    Leave a comment:


  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    The most I can find is some info on the PhyloTree, which states " Mutations that are reversions to an ancestral state (back mutations) are indicated with an exclamation mark (!)". So is C72T! a mutation and not a group as such? If you search C72T! in the tree it appears in two places, under V18 and HV0f if I'm interpreting the tree correctly.

    http://www.phylotree.org/tree/subtree_R0.htm
    Mutations are real life events.

    Groups are man made objects (concepts ) that greatly simplify talking about populations sharing the same mutations set, as each group members are genetically close to each other.

    W. (Mr.)

    P.S.
    Mutations are independent one from another. Looking a a single mutation one cannot see which branch of the phylogenetic tree of human mitochondrial DNA the mutation belongs to.

    Leave a comment:


  • jtoml3
    replied
    The most I can find is some info on the PhyloTree, which states " Mutations that are reversions to an ancestral state (back mutations) are indicated with an exclamation mark (!)". So is C72T! a mutation and not a group as such? If you search C72T! in the tree it appears in two places, under V18 and HV0f if I'm interpreting the tree correctly.

    http://www.phylotree.org/tree/subtree_R0.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • DWFlineage
    replied
    V19

    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    I got my FMS results back. Turns out I am V-C72T! so that prediction tool does have some truth.

    How common is V-C72T!? I haven't seen much of it around.

    Welcome to V. I had the full sequence test done, and I am V19.

    Best regards, Douglas W. Fisher

    Paternal: Z372+
    Maternal: V19

    Leave a comment:


  • jtoml3
    replied
    I got my FMS results back. Turns out I am V-C72T! so that prediction tool does have some truth.

    How common is V-C72T!? I haven't seen much of it around.

    Leave a comment:


  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    Excellent. I've ordered the FMS test so hopefully that sheds some light.
    Glad to be able to help.
    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    My earliest maternal ancestor I have found was from Ireland so I'm curious to see how that fits. A few places on the internet have said its a rare haplogroup. Is this true?
    I have no idea, I am only trying to use mtDNA to confirm membership in specific branches of our family tree in the last 200 years.

    W. (Mr.)

    P.S. Haplogroup H is said to be a popular one. One of the kits, I am taking care of, is in halogroup H, and there are more than eleven thousands (11,000) matches at HVR1 level.

    Leave a comment:


  • jtoml3
    replied
    Originally posted by dna View Post
    I understand that FTDNA tests enough of additional SNPs to reliably determine the major haplogroup (the first letter), so you will stay at V.

    When looking at http://www.phylotree.org/tree/subtree_R0.htm, it appears that to be in the halpgroup V in addition to results from HVR1 & HVR2, you also need to have A11719G, T14766C, C15904T and G4580A. You can retry James Lick's mthap test while adding them.

    W. (Mr.)
    Excellent. I've ordered the FMS test so hopefully that sheds some light. My earliest maternal ancestor I have found was from Ireland so I'm curious to see how that fits. A few places on the internet have said its a rare haplogroup. Is this true?

    Leave a comment:


  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    So if I was to do a FMS I could be reassigned to H? Or because of their additional SNP testing there's a good chance I'd remain in V regardless. I might have to do FMS to get some more definitive answers.
    I understand that FTDNA tests enough of additional SNPs to reliably determine the major haplogroup (the first letter), so you will stay at V.

    When looking at http://www.phylotree.org/tree/subtree_R0.htm, it appears that to be in the halpgroup V in addition to results from HVR1 & HVR2, you also need to have A11719G, T14766C, C15904T and G4580A. You can retry James Lick's mthap test while adding them.

    W. (Mr.)

    Leave a comment:


  • jtoml3
    replied
    Originally posted by dna View Post
    Without the Coding Region results nobody can properly assign a haplogroup. There is really nothing else but upgrading to the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test that can help you.

    The reason you are in the haplogroup V, and not H, is that FTDNA tests additional SNPs beyond HVR1 & HVR2 specifically to allow for a reliable haplogroup assignment/placement. FTDNA considers that their value-add.

    W. (Mr.)

    P.S.Yes, there are quite many SNPs like that (that they appear in different halogroups). No, I do not know why the mtDNA tree branches (halogroups) are designed the way they are designed.
    So if I was to do a FMS I could be reassigned to H? Or because of their additional SNP testing there's a good chance I'd remain in V regardless. I might have to do FMS to get some more definitive answers.

    Leave a comment:

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