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  • #46
    I'll admit to jealousy . I didn't get any matches closer than Genetic Distance of 2. My earliest known direct maternal ancestress was an orphan in a London orphanage in the 1860's and I am still hoping for that magical perfect match to help us solve the mystery.

    It's good to know it can happen for someone though.

    I'm H2a2a1c .

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    • #47
      Originally posted by aartemiss View Post
      bohunk, i have had a similar experience with census designations vs. family history.. on paper they were "white", but the verbal history passed down is that they were "strongly encouraged" to assimulate, to pass as white, marry white, have white children or face removal by military force.. admixture was a survival strategy for hiding in plain sight.. not that there weren't actual love matches between natives and europeans, certainly there were, but it was also a way of preserving their lives if not their blood-line, and parents who want what's best for their children were well aware that there were far more freedoms and privilages to be had by claiming the euro and denying the red.. what i've read is that the rule of thumb for census takers was to consider lifestyle as much as skin color when making their assignment, and if a mixed marriage were living with white neighbors and embracing the euro culture, the native spouse as well as their children could be counted as white, but if they were living on a res or otherwise practicing native traditions in their lifestyle, the white spouse and mixed children could be counted as amerindian regardless of whether they qualified by blood quantum or via marriage and/or adoption of the culture..

      i guess my main point is we should not dismiss family history as misinformation just because our dna may not reflect it, because there is more to it than the blood-line or skin color, and if my forefathers/mothers claim the cherokee culture as their own, i will never dispute that nor use my dna test results as a means to "prove or disprove" their claims.. it was interesting to discover how much if any NA blood i inherited, but i continue to embrace the culture even though no amerindian nor siberian was passed along to me..

      i think it is important to remember too that we don't inherit everything.. just as we only get one hair color and one eye color, we only get some but not all of what is in our ancestor's gene pool.. my sister can't be tested because she has passed, but i suspect the regional distributions we inheritted would have differed, because where i took after the europeans, she inheritted black hair, dark skin, high cheekbones, and neither of us was adopted.. so just because someone doesn't inherit a certain profile doesn't mean it isn't in their history..

      i am intrigued by the stories in my hapgroup which claim family stories of amerindian unconfirmed by dna.. it seems there is either truth to the claims but too far back to be traceable, or they were a people who lived closely with amerindians and often intermarried as many seem to be related by marriage if not by blood, or perhaps were adopted members, because i don't think so many claims should be dismissed just because they chose to "go along to get along" by agreeing to "pass as white" until it's no longer in the blood but still our cultural legacy..

      it's kind of sad, because if there is a family history of someone being jewish (for example), they are not expected to have a certain quantum of israeli blood in order to be believed, they simply are what they are due to their customs and traditions as much or more as their blood-line, and i choose to believe and respect my family stories whether they're ever fully "proven" or not..
      Very well said!!!!!

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      • #48
        M66B

        Where can I learn more about the specific origin, population migration and distribution of mtDNA haplogrop M66B.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by dnaexplorer View Post
          Where can I learn more about the specific origin, population migration and distribution of mtDNA haplogrop M66B.
          Ian Logan maintains a database of all FMS samples in GenBank by haplogroup and there are 2 M66b samples at this link:

          http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_...oup_select.htm

          If there is an active mtDNA haplogroup project you should also join the project, as there might be more M66b samples among FTDNA customers that are not in GenBank but are in the project.

          Finally, most FTDNA customers do not join the mtDNA haplogroup projects, so another source of information would be your FTDNA match list.

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          • #50
            I'm new to these forums and have been slowly trying to figure out the Family Tree DNA system for the past few weeks. I first did testing with 23andMe awhile ago, they said my mtDNA was R1a. I just did testing here and was given R1.

            (I just decided to upgrade to the mtDNA full sequence, maybe I should be waiting to post here until I get those results, but oh well...)

            Most of my ancestry goes back to colonial era Virginia, and my mother's mothers family was also in northeastern North Carolina. The more research I do, (though I haven't added much to this recently) the more confirmation I get that my ancestors were not just in the colonial North America, but in southeastern Virginia. (Except for my father's great-grandmother, who arrived in Pennsylvania, from Bavaria, in 1870.) But in confirming my direct maternal line, I realized I only have up to my grandmother's grandmother, so I don't know anything for her before 1850, basically.

            Also, I've learned, R1 (or R1a), is very rare in the British Isles. Apparently, it's common in the Caucasus. The My Origins feature here assigned 2% of my DNA (that I uploaded from 23andMe) as from Turkey, and I'm pretty sure that's only the mtDNA.

            Unfortunately, it turns out this is also a category for somewhat common Y-DNA, which is making Google searches pretty futile. 23andMe actually failed to distinguish between the mtDNA and Y-DNA categories in their search of matches for me. So, I literally could identify no one with the same mtDNA as me on that site (the results were flooded by Y-DNA). Even on these forums, it seems like the search function is designed to overlook things that look like random strings of letters and numbers (like R1a1b). I joined the R project, but I couldn't find any forums dedicated to discussion amongst people in that project.

            So, I guess I'm just asking if anyone knows why this mtDNA from the border between Europe and Asia would have ended up in the British Isles, or Colonial Virginia. Or even, what percentage of people in the UK have R1 mtDNA (I can't even find it listed anywhere). Or, beyond that, are there other forum threads I should be looking in or tools I should be using on this website. Thanks!

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Miriam View Post
              I'm new to these forums and have been slowly trying to figure out the Family Tree DNA system for the past few weeks. I first did testing with 23andMe awhile ago, they said my mtDNA was R1a. I just did testing here and was given R1.

              (I just decided to upgrade to the mtDNA full sequence, maybe I should be waiting to post here until I get those results, but oh well...)

              Most of my ancestry goes back to colonial era Virginia, and my mother's mothers family was also in northeastern North Carolina. The more research I do, (though I haven't added much to this recently) the more confirmation I get that my ancestors were not just in the colonial North America, but in southeastern Virginia. (Except for my father's great-grandmother, who arrived in Pennsylvania, from Bavaria, in 1870.) But in confirming my direct maternal line, I realized I only have up to my grandmother's grandmother, so I don't know anything for her before 1850, basically.

              Also, I've learned, R1 (or R1a), is very rare in the British Isles. Apparently, it's common in the Caucasus. The My Origins feature here assigned 2% of my DNA (that I uploaded from 23andMe) as from Turkey, and I'm pretty sure that's only the mtDNA.

              Unfortunately, it turns out this is also a category for somewhat common Y-DNA, which is making Google searches pretty futile. 23andMe actually failed to distinguish between the mtDNA and Y-DNA categories in their search of matches for me. So, I literally could identify no one with the same mtDNA as me on that site (the results were flooded by Y-DNA). Even on these forums, it seems like the search function is designed to overlook things that look like random strings of letters and numbers (like R1a1b). I joined the R project, but I couldn't find any forums dedicated to discussion amongst people in that project.

              So, I guess I'm just asking if anyone knows why this mtDNA from the border between Europe and Asia would have ended up in the British Isles, or Colonial Virginia. Or even, what percentage of people in the UK have R1 mtDNA (I can't even find it listed anywhere). Or, beyond that, are there other forum threads I should be looking in or tools I should be using on this website. Thanks!
              Without some paper trail, using only and only DNA, one cannot prove how or why a particular individual migrated hundreds of years ago or possibly thousands years ago.

              Have you read Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny in Eastern and Western Slavs by B. Malyarchuk [et al.] ? It is free at http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/8/1651.long

              For example, your mtDNA could have come to Europe in Neolithic times or from India in modern times...

              Let's wait for your FMS results.

              Do you have any HVR1 & HVR2 matches? If you do, those matches who have done FMS, what haplogroups do they have ?

              W. (Mr.)

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Miriam View Post
                So, I guess I'm just asking if anyone knows why this mtDNA from the border between Europe and Asia would have ended up in the British Isles, or Colonial Virginia. Or even, what percentage of people in the UK have R1 mtDNA (I can't even find it listed anywhere). Or, beyond that, are there other forum threads I should be looking in or tools I should be using on this website. Thanks!
                If you have not already, you might also want to view Ian's web page for R1a. There is a subclade R1a1a2 that is western European, so it will be interesting to see if you are also in that group. A key step to udnerstanding the migrations is estimating the age of the subclades. I'd suggest that when you get your FMS results you look at all available samples and try to estimate the age of your subclade.

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