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Maternal Haplogroup R

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  • Maternal Haplogroup R

    my boyfriend got his results back from 23andMe and they said his haplogroup is maternal haplogroup R. there were no letters or numbers after the 'R'. his maternal line is siscilian, italian. could someone explain maternal haplogroup R to me? thanks...

  • #2
    Originally posted by jilski View Post
    my boyfriend got his results back from 23andMe and they said his haplogroup is maternal haplogroup R. there were no letters or numbers after the 'R'. his maternal line is siscilian, italian. could someone explain maternal haplogroup R to me? thanks...
    Haplogroup R is more common in Asia, but several branches like R1a are spread thinly accross Europe.
    I just received the FGS results for my Bulgarian grandfather's maternal line, which was originally plain R, but now was refined to R1a1.
    At HVR1 level I had many R matches around Europe with FamilyTree, but at haplogroup level(those, who did the FGS test) I have only 2 - one Italian and one Hungarian.

    I have found something usefull in the study:

    Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny in Eastern and Western Slavs
    B. Malyarchuk,* T. Grzybowski, M. Derenko,* M. Perkova,* T. Vanecek, J. Lazur,P. Gomolcak,k and I. Tsybovsky


    Refinement of the Haplogroup R1 Phylogeny
    There is very little complete mitochondrial sequence
    data concerning haplogroup R1, very rarely observed in
    European populations (Richards et al. 2000). In eastern Europe,
    R1 haplotypes were encountered only in northwestern
    Russians and Poles (Malyarchuk et al. 2004; Grzybowski
    et al. 2007). To date, only one complete mtDNA sequence
    belonging to this clade has been published from the
    Brahmin population of India (sample C134; Palanichamy
    et al. 2004). Five additional genomes presented here allow
    us to refine the R1 phylogeny (fig. 2). The root of R1 can
    now be defined by 15 coding region mutations, whereas
    3 transitions at nps 4026, 5378, and 7424 separate subcluster
    R1a from haplotypes characterized by transitions at nps
    14162, 15497, and 16278. In turn, subcluster R1a consists
    of 2 clades—an Indian one represented by sample C134
    (Palanichamy et al. 2004) and the Caucasus/European
    one, R1a1, which is defined by the 13105 and 13368 transitions.
    It should be noted that haplogroup R1 was described
    for the first time in Adygei from the northern Caucasus
    (Macaulay et al. 1999). Its presence, albeit at low frequencies,
    was then confirmed in some populations of the Caucasus
    (e.g., in the Kabardins which are linguistically related
    to the Adygei people) (Nasidze and Stoneking 2001), the
    Near East (Richards et al. 2000; Rowold et al. 2007),
    and the south Caspian region (in Iran and Turkmenistan)
    (Metspalu et al. 2004; Quintana-Murci et al. 2004).
    It has been suggested that haplogroup R1 and other
    haplogroups rarely observed in European populations
    (R2, N1a) were brought to Europe from the Near East in
    the Neolithic times (Torroni et al. 2006). Meanwhile, the
    complete sequencing of R1 mtDNAs suggests a deep split
    between the more ancient 16278–16311 R1 branch and the
    R1a subcluster, about 28,300 ± 4,900 YBP (fig. 2). A second
    split (about 16,450 ± 4,100 YBP) is seen between the
    Indian haplotype C134 and the R1a1 subcluster. Both R1
    types are present in Adygei population of the northern
    Caucasus (Macaulay et al. 1999), thus suggesting that
    R1 evolution occurred in the Caucasus area, from where
    these lineages have extended in different directions. It is
    known that the Adygei people (the Adygei, Cherkess, and
    Kabardins) are one of the most ancient indigenous populations
    of the Caucasus region. Therefore, the presence of R1
    haplotypes in populations of northwestern Russians can be
    explained by the contribution of northern Caucasus populations
    to the Russian gene pool.

    However, my grandfather's sequence does not have the mutations 13105 and 13368 found in the Russian samples, nor is close to the Indian sample, so possibly is from the Caucasian branch.

    Here is also the FamilyTree mtDNA haplogroup R project:

    http://www.familytreedna.com/public/...tion=mtresults

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    • #3
      thanks... i wonder if his maternal line goes back to an asian grandmother...?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jilski View Post
        thanks... i wonder if his maternal line goes back to an asian grandmother...?
        Yes, but could be 7000 years back with the spread of Neolithic people.
        If I remember correctly, on the now defunct dna-forums there was another speculation - mtDNA R1 could be an Indo-European marker as it has some correlation with Y haplogroup R1a in Europe, Middle East and India.

        Comment


        • #5
          Look at PhyloTree for a broad perspective:


          http://www.phylotree.org/tree/main.htm

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