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  • 11 To 12 Marker, Same Area

    We have an 11 of 12 marker match in same area as 5 members with exact 12 markers. How can I explain this? a further generation? what would/could this mean? thanks for helping me explain to members.

    We do have another SELLERS family born here in this area 1762 Not proven to this family. What could this mean?
    IF he had a diff father , but a brother later down the road, would the markers still be the same??

    Thanks for helping me/us understand

    marie,iowa
    [email protected]

  • #2
    There is nothing odd about an 11 out of 12 match within the same group. Every time a mutation occurs the father and son will not match. There is no reason this wouldn't occur in the first 12 markers.

    I'm not sure I understand the second question. I believe you want to know if half brothers (they have a different fathers) will match. In most cases the only way they would match is if the different fathers had a common paternal ancestor. If both fathers belonged to a very common Haplogroup it is possible that they would have the same 12 markers and not be kin. All the more reason to test more than 12 markers.

    Jim Barrett

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    • #3
      JIM, thanks for helping.

      I was trying to understand Why we had 11 markers instead of 12 on one test
      and 12 markers on FIVE other Sellers in this same time and area.
      IF We are brothers?
      wouldn't they have same dna?

      A kinda forget what the mutation is?
      Still can be related, but, futher down the line??

      and because
      We do have another family of Sellers here in this area and time frame Not proven to us by dna,

      IF they had a much older SELLERS , wouldn't they match?

      Thank you for helping us. marie, iowa

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      • #4
        Originally posted by [email protected]
        JIM, thanks for helping.

        I was trying to understand Why we had 11 markers instead of 12 on one test
        and 12 markers on FIVE other Sellers in this same time and area.
        IF We are brothers?
        wouldn't they have same dna?

        A kinda forget what the mutation is?
        Still can be related, but, futher down the line??
        Jim explained that mutations are random, so there's nothing to stop a mutation on a marker from occurring in one son while another son of the same father doesn't have that mutation.

        In that case, the father and one son would match 12/12, while the second son would be an 11/12 match with his father and brother. But they'd still all be in the same paternal line.

        Of course, if each of those sons had sons and grandsons, etc., you would be able to distinguish the two different branches of that paternal line by the one mutation difference.

        Mike Maddi

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        • #5
          MIKE, thank you.
          now the child that has the mutation pass this to all of his sons?
          marie, iowa

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          • #6
            MIKE, thank you.
            now the child that has the mutation pass this to all of his sons?
            marie, iowa

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            • #7
              Originally posted by [email protected]
              MIKE, thank you.
              now the child that has the mutation pass this to all of his sons?
              marie, iowa
              Yes, that mutation is passed along his line, unless it mutates back or even more in one of his descendants.

              One thing Jim referred to is that you should consider upgrading to more markers. If you're trying to determine relationships within a paternal line between different branchse, 12 markers is just not enough. Upgrading to 37 markers would be a good idea.

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              • #8
                MIKE, thank you for helping me understand. and Jim also. marie, iowa

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mutation Rates

                  Please remember that mutation rates are averages. They are determined by looking at many lines over a period of time.

                  If you look only at the case where a mutation occurred between father and son you could say the mutation rate was once every generation. If you look the same marker in the same family over a period of 10 generations you might find that this was the only time a mutation had occurred so your mutation rate is much slower.

                  Think of mutation rates as the speed of vehicles on the interstate. Let's say that most of the people drive the speed limit of 70 so the average speed is 70, but we all know there are people out there that drive much faster than that and there are people who drive much slower than that. The point being, just because the average speed is 70, doesn't maen that everyone will be driving 70.

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