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Are Admin's playing-hide-and-seek?

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  • Are Admin's playing-hide-and-seek?

    Please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.
    I have been named the administrator of our surname. I can not in good conscience set up a surname project where they have to get my permission on comparing their DNA to ours. What are people to do if they only have their markers and have no idea who their relatives are ¿.
    I always thought that family research was share and share alike. Of course one has to put restraints on what they share in today’s world. Some use politics/religion as a weapon to govern their sharing practices.. We have had a few “matches” of our DNA but the matched surname is not our surname, so I just ignore the match. Am I supposed to do a follow-up on non surname matches?. I do not want our DNA testing results to turn into a game of “hide and seek”. You go hide, and I will go play, this is childish behavior..
    Thanks, dc

  • #2
    I do not fully understand what you are asking here. In a 34 or better match out of 37 I would persue this regardless of surname. As far as sharing genealoical data.... dead individuals absolutely should be shared. Living people should have their privacy respected but their "dead" line should be made available matched to a kit# or some ID that doesn't reveal personal info.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by darroll
      I can not in good conscience set up a surname project where they have to get my permission on comparing their DNA to ours.
      There are a couple of different levels of privacy.

      One comes from individual customers of FamilyTreeDNA. Every customer has a right to share or not share their DNA results with the rest of the world as they see fit. They can share with no one, with only surname matches, or with everyone. They can also hide mtDNA results from Group Administrators (but cannot hide yDNA results from them).

      Another comes from the Group Administrator's ability to have the surname project appear or not appear in the list of projects at FamilyTreeDNA.com. Different projects take different approaches, based on their needs and the wishes of the project member.

      Yet another comes from the Group Administrator's ability to publish or not publish the results of the project participants results on the internet. Again, different projects make different choices. Administrators cannot make public the results of a test in a case where the participant wants to remain private but can choose to not publish results at all.

      As a Group Administrator, most of these choices are YOURS to make.

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      • #4
        This should clarify my earlier thread.
        A friend e-mailed me. He had his DNA tested. He got on the DNA search sites and found a very close match and a surname. He contacted the administrator and did not even get a reply. Y-search does not show a pedigree. He is upset and I can not blame him. I got on FT DNA and the person did not answer my request either.. He still has no idea who his parents were. I find this disgusting. dc

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        • #5
          Originally posted by darroll
          This should clarify my earlier thread.
          A friend e-mailed me. He had his DNA tested. He got on the DNA search sites and found a very close match and a surname. He contacted the administrator and did not even get a reply. Y-search does not show a pedigree. He is upset and I can not blame him. I got on FT DNA and the person did not answer my request either.. He still has no idea who his parents were. I find this disgusting. dc
          Now I understand. In this case the administrator should have had responded out of curtacy. The admin does not have the right to give you the information without permission of the person to whom your friend matched. I would think the admin should contact the other person and make them aware of the situation and pass on the contact information. So yes, I understand why you and your friend are upset about this. Have multiple attempts at contact been made? It could be the emails were not delivered due to server error or a spam filter. Also if it is FTDNA you could ask them to contact the matching party.

          These are some avenues you can try to get the information you need.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GvdM
            Now I understand. In this case the administrator should have had responded out of curtacy. The admin does not have the right to give you the information without permission of the person to whom your friend matched. I would think the admin should contact the other person and make them aware of the situation and pass on the contact information.
            It may be worth pointing out that some people have HUGE numbers of close matches, especially at lower marker counts, and cannot POSSIBLY be closely related to them all. Responding to every email inquiry could be a big burden to those folks.

            I agree that it could be considered discourteous to not respond to an email of this type, but I also understand that the project administrator had no duty to do so.

            Another (polite!) request to look into the situation is probably your friends best bet.

            And now that YOU are a project administrator yourself, you have the opportunity to set a better example.

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            • #7
              I have ran into this a lot on the NET. I’m just full of Please, Thank you(s). Maybe a little power is going to their head. I won’t beg. Won’t give up, but don’t want to be a pest either as they will just block MY e-mails or complain to my ISP.. Takes all kinds..
              Maybe this is a good example of the “good Ole Boy Network”. dc

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darroll
                Maybe a little power is going to their head. Maybe this is a good example of the “good Ole Boy Network”. dc
                Hey, somebody got power? What power? If being a project administrator came with any power, they forgot to tell me.

                Seriously, one non-responsive project administrator is not evidence of a grand conspiracy.

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                • #9
                  No, I don’t feel this is any kind of conspiracy. I have been doing research for 20 years.
                  I just think a lot of people doing DNA/Research hang out in their own little groups. They will not accept or help any outsiders. You should hear some of the stories that I have been told. I believe some of them and look in our vast family records and help them find their lines.. I should be suspicious when they do not even know their mother/fathers name. I feel that OUR family records (non living) are not mine, but belong to the family. The family wants these records shared. We even got conned out of some living family members. I had discussed this with the family and they told me to share their family tree because this gal from Florida was so nice... That was about three years ago and We have not heard a thing from her since. It makes you wonder what she is going to do with the information.. To sum this up: I’m not shocked by anything, anymore. My hope is still up even though this latest experience took most of the wind out of my research sails. dc

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by darroll
                    Please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.
                    I have been named the administrator of our surname. I can not in good conscience set up a surname project where they have to get my permission on comparing their DNA to ours. What are people to do if they only have their markers and have no idea who their relatives are ¿.
                    I always thought that family research was share and share alike. Of course one has to put restraints on what they share in today’s world. Some use politics/religion as a weapon to govern their sharing practices.. We have had a few “matches” of our DNA but the matched surname is not our surname, so I just ignore the match. Am I supposed to do a follow-up on non surname matches?. I do not want our DNA testing results to turn into a game of “hide and seek”. You go hide, and I will go play, this is childish behavior..
                    Thanks, dc

                    YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO DO WHAT YOU WILL WITH YOURS
                    but others are to be up to the owners so they make as much of any choices as possible

                    Comment

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