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R1b. Celtic Britons-Angloxasons

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  • #16
    I find YSTRs useful for finding some SNP branches but not for dating them. The vast majority of testers who are closest to me in haplotype give their origin in the Isles. That is why I believe that L11 originated in western Europe as they all belong to this group. Their autosomal results also show the same.

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    • #17
      Once again

      Once again, thank you...1798. Your answer is very useful. You can count on me for anything you need.
      Best wishes.

      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
      I find YSTRs useful for finding some SNP branches but not for dating them. The vast majority of testers who are closest to me in haplotype give their origin in the Isles. That is why I believe that L11 originated in western Europe as they all belong to this group. Their autosomal results also show the same.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by geltcheltnghelt2 View Post
        Once again, thank you...1798. Your answer is very useful. You can count on me for anything you need.
        Best wishes.
        Thanks for your support.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
          "Based on the STR dating"

          Using STRs for dating is a thing of the past and very inaccurate. SNPs are the way to go.
          Wouldn't the wisest course of action be to use both STRs and SNPs rather than claiming one to be superior to the other?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 1798 View Post
            Proto-Germanic (the immediate ancestor to the Germanic language family) did not develop until about 500 BC.

            The U106 family originated in western Europe between 3,500-4000 BC at least 3000 years before the birth of the German language. The U106 family spoke all the languages that have been spoken in western Europe in those 5-6000 years.
            Maybe, but today U106 seems to be most common in people of Germanic ancestry. It would seem that non-Germanic U106 either died out or is very rare.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
              Maybe, but today U106 seems to be most common in people of Germanic ancestry. It would seem that non-Germanic U106 either died out or is very rare.

              Are you really racist or just pretending? P312 is more common in German language areas than U106. Have you a problem with that?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                Are you really racist or just pretending? P312 is more common in German language areas than U106. Have you a problem with that?
                I don't know if P312 is more common in German language areas than U106 but that isn't the issue. In modern times, U106 tends to be most common in areas where Germanic languages are dominant.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
                  I don't know if P312 is more common in German language areas than U106 but that isn't the issue. In modern times, U106 tends to be most common in areas where Germanic languages are dominant.
                  That means absolutely nothing. The division is in your mind. You must be one of these purist L21 people.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                    That means absolutely nothing. The division is in your mind. You must be one of these purist L21 people.
                    Are you saying that L21 isn't dominant in areas of Ireland that were traditionally Celtic?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by kevinduffy View Post
                      Are you saying that L21 isn't dominant in areas of Ireland that were traditionally Celtic?
                      Can these people trace their ancestors to Austria? And if they can they are only recent migrants. Ireland has been populated since the LGM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                        Can these people trace their ancestors to Austria? And if they can they are only recent migrants. Ireland has been populated since the LGM.
                        But are you saying that U106 has been in Ireland longer than L21?

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                        • #27
                          Reply

                          Hi Kevin, how are you?...thanks for participating and intervening in the forum. Look, I'll explain just that after a while, I thought that maybe my ancestors were Celtic, but later I knew I was not. My roots are in Anglia, Denmark, by father line and by mother line is in England. I am of the lineage of the Anglos, so to speak in a way, I'm happy with that.
                          In Austria you can find what is the Hallstatt culture and from there arise both Celtic (Urnfield culture and La Tene culture) and the Germans (Unitice culture and Jastorf culture).
                          DNA lets us know where we come from to know where we are and to know where we're going.
                          It is our destiny. Our ancestors left us a trail and we leave them a trail to our descendants.
                          OH, the SNP dating s very good, highly recommended when the STR is based on samples and takes longer to get results and SNP can find more information and can achieve more results, is amazing, 1798, our colleague recommended it to me and that is worth it.
                          The L21 and the S21 is the of the Atlantic European branch and where the haplogroup R1b is abundant.
                          In countries such as North of the Italy, France, Brittany, Spain, Galicia, Portugal, Basque country (Euskal Herria) and much is in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Isle of Man, Cornwall. Of course it is in England (East Anglia, England) and even in Scandinavia.
                          Last edited by geltcheltnghelt2; 23rd August 2015, 06:33 PM. Reason: corrections

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                          • #28
                            Interesting data in Spanish languaje

                            Information Source:

                            Link: http://jesusgonzalezfonseca.blogspot...ropa-y-de.html

                            * Author: Jesus Gonzalez Fonseca.

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                            • #29
                              Disappointed

                              I know I shouldn't be ... but I'm disappointed at my results

                              British 93%
                              Scando 5%
                              Middle Eastern 2%

                              Not at all what I hoped for. I'm a Celt with a little bit of other stuff in the mix. My family is from Lancashire with a Scottish mother so can't expect anything else? Any ideas on the Middle Eastern? Could this be an indication of Roman origins? .... I hope.

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                              • #30
                                Hard to say anything with so little information to go on. Let me know your kit number and I'll have a look at your results. I presume you have already been assigned to the Lancashire county subgroup?

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