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Ibo and Bantu mtDNA Similar???

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  • GregKiroKH2
    started a topic Ibo and Bantu mtDNA Similar???

    Ibo and Bantu mtDNA Similar???

    I have been thinking about this for some time. It seems as if Ibo and Bantu mtDNA is very similar using some rare polymorphisms.

    The Ibos live in Iboland. It comes as no surprise that the stifling heat of central Africa would dictate the type of clothing worn by any native peoples. The Ibos wear little or nothing until they reach puberty. At this time, the men usually wear loose-fitting cotton shirts and a loincloth, while the women wrap different pieces of cloth around themselves and also wrap some cloth around their head. The men often carry machetes, useful for clearing overgrown paths and offering protection for wild animals. The Ibos are profoundly religious. These polytheistic people worship many gods. They believe that there are three levels of divine beings: the highest level is the supreme god, or “Chukwu.” Underneath Chukwu are lesser gods, called “Umuagbara”, and under these are the “Ndi Ichie,” the spirits of dead people. The Ibos also believe in reincarnation. They see death as a transient phase between life and the spirit world. When someone dies, he or she starts a new life in the spirit world. After a time in the spirit world, a dead person would be reborn as a new person and the cycle would continue on. Each village has priests and priestesses who help in all spiritual matters, conducting ceremonies and rituals. And since the Ibos believe that everything in life is controlled by higher powers, there are also diviners in a village that attempt to predict the future. The language of the Ibos is very interesting. It is derived from a group of languages commonly found in West Africa, the Kwa languages. It is based a lot on pitch, vocal inflections, and context when defining the meaning of a word. A single word can have numerous meanings depending on these factors. Idioms and proverbs play an important role in the Ibo language. Someone who does not use them in speech is considered a novice at speaking the language.
    http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/oldworld/africa/

  • SallImSayin
    replied
    After doing research over last few years, especially on Bantu people, it's clear that the source is the same for certain groups (specifically Igbo and certain Akan people, especially). Despite speaking languages from different language families you can see the resemblance in looks, height, and some cultural things.

    When we follow the trail way back, I think we'll find a common source.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    Once I figured out my length heteroplasmy everything else was easier.

    Originally posted by casadecoqui
    Hi, Greg, Denise and all:

    I just found out my results will be delayed another month. Probably no results until May 11th. Sigh..... More waiting.

    Leave a comment:


  • casadecoqui
    replied
    Hi, Greg, Denise and all:

    I just found out my results will be delayed another month. Probably no results until May 11th. Sigh..... More waiting.


    Originally posted by casadecoqui
    If that is any indication, I think I will probably have some obscure HV* or NA type of mutations added to my L1c since so many of my maternal/ female lines were indigenous, from Spain or the Canary Islands besides all the African lines.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    One thing I can tell for sure from the full mtDNA is that there is no recombination from the fathers (which we knew already). So, I am wondering why the coding region and the control region give the same haplogroup for many people. After I labeled my L1c results, the next group I looked at was the pathway to H (for some reason). The roots and branches are so obvious.

    Originally posted by casadecoqui
    If that is any indication, I think I will probably have some obscure HV* or NA type of mutations added to my L1c since so many of my maternal/ female lines were indigenous, from Spain or the Canary Islands besides all the African lines.

    Leave a comment:


  • casadecoqui
    replied
    If that is any indication, I think I will probably have some obscure HV* or NA type of mutations added to my L1c since so many of my maternal/ female lines were indigenous, from Spain or the Canary Islands besides all the African lines.

    Originally posted by GregKiroKH2
    I made my order in August 2006, Ana, and the results were given to me one month later than the due date. I have accounted for all but one mutation out of 87 mutations, C8657T. My new assignment (made up be me ) of L1c1cH2preK* matches 16568 bp out of 16569 bp which has less ambiguity than assignments based on HVR alone. I am a little amazed at the dual paths.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    I made my order in August 2006, Ana, and the results were given to me one month later than the due date. I have accounted for all but one mutation out of 87 mutations, C8657T. My new assignment (made up be me ) of L1c1cH2preK* matches 16568 bp out of 16569 bp which has less ambiguity than assignments based on HVR alone. I am a little amazed at the dual paths.

    Originally posted by casadecoqui
    Greg,

    I forgot to ask how long it took for your MEGA to come in. My results are a month behind.

    Since Denise and I are only one mutation different in HVR1, she has 527T and I have 093C, I would like to compare with her as well. You differ from us at 038C and 086C. On HVR2, we three are exact matches and have the most mutations at 28. Our lines are pretty old being and unbroken for so long.

    So, I'll be waiting for you, too, Denise.

    Leave a comment:


  • casadecoqui
    replied
    Greg,

    I forgot to ask how long it took for your MEGA to come in. My results are a month behind.

    Since Denise and I are only one mutation different in HVR1, she has 527T and I have 093C, I would like to compare with her as well. You differ from us at 038C and 086C. On HVR2, we three are exact matches and have the most mutations at 28. Our lines are pretty old being and unbroken for so long.

    So, I'll be waiting for you, too, Denise.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    I think these control region markers will be found high in the Niger-Congo family members who are L1c1.

    L1c1? T5108C G5460A C7948T C15626T A16038G T16086C (Niger-Congo family)

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    Niger-Congo family

    The general name of the group is called the Niger-Congo family.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    bad link

    http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural...boculture.html

    Leave a comment:

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