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  • Is Family Tree DNA part of this?

    Bennett and I just returned from Washington D.C., where we attended the launching of The Genographic Project at the headquarters of the National Geographic Society.

    Indeed, Family Tree DNA is the party responsible for the testing related to the public participation.

    This is the culmination of a work of over a year, and as it was noted in this list, since the very beginning we also saw The Genographic Project, idealized by Dr. Spencer Wells, as an undertaking of great magnitude for the genealogical community, as in conjuction with the important goals of the Project itself, it would play an important role in raising awareness of DNA testing for genealogy and deep ancestry among the wide public.

    In the next few days we will be adding information to the Family Tree DNA web site which will respond to many of the questions posted in this list. As new relevant questions come in, we will be including them in our FAQ specifically related to The Genographic Project.

    We always mentioned that you were the pioneers and the day would come when this would become a widely accepted tool for the genealogical community.

    As we are reaching this milestone, we thank you for your support and we will continue doing our best in order to continue deserving it.

    E-mail me anytime!


    Max Blankfeld
    VP Operations & Marketing
    Family Tree DNA
    History Unearthed Daily
    http://www.familytreedna.com
    713-868-1438
    Max Blankfeld
    Vice-President and COO @ Family Tree DNA
    A Gene by Gene Company

  • #2
    While our Genographic FAQ page is not live yet, I would like to answer here one of the most common questions that we've been asked. If you are a Family Tree DNA customer, having already been tested for the Y-DNA or the mtDNA, there is no need to purchase a kit from the Genographic Project. In a few weeks we will make available in your personal page at Family Tree DNA, a tool that will allow you to upload your results to The Genographic Project and have your own personal page there. There will be a nominal fee for this upload, and proceeds from this fee will be directed to the Genographic's Legacy Project , which will support education and cultural preservation projects among participating indigenous groups.

    E-mail me any time!
    Max Blankfeld
    Vice-President and COO @ Family Tree DNA
    A Gene by Gene Company

    Comment


    • #3
      Good price!

      Hi- Unless i'm reading some of the info incorrectly, does that mean a male person will get both Y DNA and mitochondrial DNA analysis for only $99 total plus shipping?

      That's considerably cheaper than the combo currently offered thru familytree dna site.That's not a complaint; I have been thinking about purchasing analyses for family members, and it looks like this new project would be the way to go.

      Is there any reason for new customers to order directly via familytree dna? Maybe upgrades to 25 and 37 markers or to mtdna plus are not available by ordering thru national geographic? or maybe there's no search for cohanim marker if that's relevent? Please let us know if there's anything that buying directly thru familytreedna will provide that buying indirectly thru the currently cheaper national geographic world project would not provide.

      thanks much.
      Last edited by penguin; 14 April 2005, 03:56 PM. Reason: typing errors

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      • #4
        Genographic DNA Analysis

        My son just jumped in and ordered the test for himself and his wife, and I cannot find out, on the website, just what it entails? STR or SNP? How many loci? I don't think these things should be a secret??

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        • #5
          The Genographic kit is $99.95 one test - Y-DNA 12 markers or mtDNA (HVR1)
          Max Blankfeld
          Vice-President and COO @ Family Tree DNA
          A Gene by Gene Company

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by admin
            The Genographic kit is $99.95 one test - Y-DNA 12 markers or mtDNA (HVR1)
            According to the National Geographic site

            http://www5.nationalgeographic.com/g...rticipate.html

            "Males: Y-DNA test. This test allows you to identify your deep ancestral geographic origins on your direct paternal line."

            If the actual test is 12 STR markers, then how will users be able to identify their deep ancestral geographic origins as the Genographic project website promises? Using the predicted haplogroup designation? In that case, many clients will be uncertain about their haplogroup without additional SNP testing, which does not seem to be included in the $99.95+ price.

            Comment


            • #7
              I recommend that people who are serious about integrating genealogy & DNA analysis continue to use Family Tree DNA. They offer a lot (upgrades to 25 or 37 for y-DNA; SNP testing for y-DNA; HVR2 for mtDNA), as well as surname & other projects.

              Will the genographic administrators notify people of matches? I doubt it.

              I am glad to hear that Family Tree DNA particpants can have their data uploaded to the genographic project; another example of how flexible Family Tree DNA is.

              Timothy Peterman

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              • #8
                The actual 12 markers test might not be able to identify the deep ancestral geographic origins of the participants, but many of them will surely want to do additional testing, which, business considerations apart, could uncover a lot of matches for those of us who already know our haplotypes.

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                • #9
                  I look forward to learning more about this project. I have read some Dr. Cavalli-Sforza as well as Dr. Wells and Dr. Oppenheimer. I must say the popular books they wrote and not the scientific publications.

                  I recall that part of the challenge was to identify indigenous populations on which to base the root of the human genomic tree. The stepwise progression of which SNP markers is based depends on this starting point. Dr. Wells book mentions that at this juncture in time it is becoming increasingly difficult with mass travel and mixture of people to identify where more recent SNPs have arisen. the time resolution of SNPs is broadly spaced across thousands of years. I am assuming we are dealing with SNPs?

                  I suppose if you got 1% of a target population Like R1b1c to participate that you could find sub-populations? What can todays customer realistically expect. Can we expect to pin down our results to a geographic location the size of a modern country, province or town? 12 Markers doesn't sound like much. Where can we read more about the projects goals and methodology?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EBurgess
                    I look forward to learning more about this project. I have read some Dr. Cavalli-Sforza as well as Dr. Wells and Dr. Oppenheimer. I must say the popular books they wrote and not the scientific publications.

                    I recall that part of the challenge was to identify indigenous populations on which to base the root of the human genomic tree. The stepwise progression of which SNP markers is based depends on this starting point. Dr. Wells book mentions that at this juncture in time it is becoming increasingly difficult with mass travel and mixture of people to identify where more recent SNPs have arisen. the time resolution of SNPs is broadly spaced across thousands of years. I am assuming we are dealing with SNPs?

                    I suppose if you got 1% of a target population Like R1b1c to participate that you could find sub-populations? What can todays customer realistically expect. Can we expect to pin down our results to a geographic location the size of a modern country, province or town? 12 Markers doesn't sound like much. Where can we read more about the projects goals and methodology?
                    I hate to sound like a cynic, but why should we be so ingenuous to suppose that they are only going to look at the 12 markers and ignore the trove of the remainder genetic material?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Victor
                      I hate to sound like a cynic, but why should we be so ingenuous to suppose that they are only going to look at the 12 markers and ignore the trove of the remainder genetic material?
                      Hi all
                      (this isn't directed specifically to you Victor )

                      I'm guessing that the customer participation tests will be analysed quite differently from the proper research samples.
                      For the paying customer, I'm guessing they will be only doing the analyses that are paid for. My impression is that the two parts of the project will be quite separate.

                      The non public-participation samples, I sincerely hope will have far more intensive analyses done to them - they are the real samples for the project I think.
                      As someone with postgraduate training in Evolutionary ecology, who is knowledgeable in correct scientific study design,.. I can't see that the customer samples could be legitimately included in the data for the main project. It goes against the rules of unbiased participant selection.

                      In terms of scientific integrity, they should not be including the results of the paying public (self selected) in the results of the global project.

                      If this study is being done 100% scientifically, the public participation samples are just a “feel-good” “join into the spirit of things” test, that won’t really contribute much to deeper research.

                      I'm also, like nry_j, quite frankly surprised that only 12 marker tests (for males) are going to be done for the public participation tests. STR's are good for finding recent genealogical time frame relationships, but for Anthropological deep ancestry - SNP testing is far more scientifically objective.

                      Angela.

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                      • #12
                        Matches in National Geographic database

                        Will FTDNA clients be able to search the NG database for exact anonymous matches. In my own case for both my Y strs and HRV1 mtdna, I have found exact matches in the published literature or on the web. The additional matches were highly informative although not entirely surprising. The additional matches provided a broader perspective than could be obtained from the FTDNR results alone.

                        The problem is that most samples so far have been samples of opportunity rather than random or stratified random samples. Academic studies are not exempt from this problem. Replication is only a partial cure since replications may also be biased.

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                        • #13
                          Check this FAQ for additional information:
                          http://www.familytreedna.com/ftdna_genographic.html
                          Max Blankfeld
                          Vice-President and COO @ Family Tree DNA
                          A Gene by Gene Company

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Victor
                            I hate to sound like a cynic, but why should we be so ingenuous to suppose that they are only going to look at the 12 markers and ignore the trove of the remainder genetic material?
                            Two answers:
                            a) the 12 markers allows to identify the deep ancestral origins of the person, and that's in fact the goal of the project, which ill halp trace the map of human migration;
                            b) you can trust that if National Geographic, IBM, and we are telling you that we will look only at what we are announcing, that's what really is.
                            Max Blankfeld
                            Vice-President and COO @ Family Tree DNA
                            A Gene by Gene Company

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                            • #15
                              Max how will this effect the time tests take to be done?
                              maybe dec wont be a break and the delay wont happen i fear you will be overloaded

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