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  • #16
    Originally posted by rover View Post
    Well it is a long story as you said. I think I eventually grasped your main point in it. Looks like every family has scandles and the children are kept in the dark which is not fair. I defenitely do not want to do that to my children and I think they should know exactly who they are. Thats why I have taken to this. So........, looks like we have a little in common.
    I realy dont understand why my father (died when I was young) did not take the initiative to trace his biologycal father or atleast educate us children about it.
    My main concern is why am I carrying a surname of an out sider (my step grand father) for which I am very angry. But I have made sure not to pass it on to my chidren.
    May be in a week or two I should have the initial results and lets see whats in store for me.

    If you want to you can legally change your own surname in court. Call your county courthouse to ask what the produres are.

    Good luck with your tests.

    My mom raised me with her surname, but legally I had my fathers surname, even though he skipped out on me. I found out that I had my fathers name when I was 13. After I had him legally declared my father I legally dropped the name he gave me.
    My father was raised with his step fathers surname, who he hated, and found out his legal name when he entered the army (he had a choice of army or jail).
    Last edited by rainbow; 24 February 2009, 12:15 PM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by vinnie View Post
      Hi Rainbow,

      I find your story very interesting, although somewhat sad. It's not only sad for you personally, but because it speaks, in my opinion, to the prejudices that are still found in our society, both in regards to ethnicity/race, but also to birth situations that are considered less than ideal. In addition, people just don't get how short life is, until it's too late, and then sometimes, if you're lucky, you get a deathbed reconciliation among family members.

      I've experienced a little of this myself in regards to one of my great grandmothers. We know she was adopted, and I think there's at least one relative who knows a lot more than s/he will admit. Likewise, I met someone whose maternal grandmother is from the same town where I know my ggrandmother was born; he was quite interested in testing - until he talked to his family about it. Then he just put me off every time I asked him about it; they're probably afraid that they may be related, and don't want any part of the "scandal". So if I meet someone else with maternal ties to the same place, I'm not going to mention the adoption in hopes that I can get them to test. In the mean time, guess we've both got to be happy with what we have accomplished, and let go of the rest.

      Vinnie

      Thank you Vinnie

      The "let go of the rest" is the most difficult part. On some things I can breathe a sigh of relief as I let go. But I can be very stubborn sometimes and it takes me a long time to let go. This 17% Native American is still very fresh with me, even though I've had the resut since Sept 2006. I spent the first two years wondering if there was a lab mix-up, etc. Or if it's Central Asian and not Native American, or a combo of both. I had concluded it's a comination. But what if it isn't? I want to know if it's from my fathers mother or my fathers father.
      Unless my father's relatives email me that they will test, then I guess I will have to let go, for a while.
      If any of my fathers half-siblings test and have Native American, then it would be from their mother (my paternal grandmother). If they test and they don't have it, then it would be that my Czechoslovakian grandfather (my fathers father) isn't my real grandfather. If my father and/or his full-sister test and have about 34% then I'll know for sure my test results aren't a fluke.
      Last edited by rainbow; 24 February 2009, 12:33 PM.

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      • #18
        off subject

        I finally found out who my great-grandparents were on my maternal grandfather's side, i.e. the Austrians. I sent to Wisconsin for the death certificate of my grandfather's brother, and his parents (born & died in Austria) were listed. But there of course was no other info regarding them.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by rainbow View Post
          If you want to you can legally change your own surname in court. Call your county courthouse to ask what the produres are.

          Good luck with your tests.

          My mom raised me with her surname, but legally I had my fathers surname, even though he skipped out on me. I found out that I had my fathers name when I was 13. After I had him legally declared my father I legally dropped the name he gave me.
          My father was raised with his step fathers surname, who he hated, and found out his legal name when he entered the army (he had a choice of army or jail).
          You guessed it Rainbow, this is what I intend doing. Eventually have a legal name change and get my real identity. I hope my dna results would be enough to support it. Thanks.
          And so...., your father's name that you carried untill you changed it.....was it your step grand dad's name or was it his real sur name. If it is the former then you and I experience/ed similar frustrating situations.

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          • #20
            Rainbow,

            Although your primary research interest is not Slovakia, here is a site to look up the current distribution of surnames there: http://slovnik.juls.savba.sk/

            Also, I have this paper and its supporting data. E-mail me at [email protected] if you want a copy.

            Announcement of population data
            Genetic variation analysis of 15 autosomal STR loci in Eastern Slovak Caucasian and Romany (Gypsy) population M. Sota ́k *, E. Petrejcˇı ́kova ́, J. Bernasovska ́, I. Bernasovsky ́, A. Sovicˇova ́, I. Boronˇova ́, P. Sˇ vicˇkova ́,A.Bo

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            • #21
              mine not found...

              Originally posted by Jim Honeychuck View Post
              Rainbow,

              Although your primary research interest is not Slovakia, here is a site to look up the current distribution of surnames there: http://slovnik.juls.savba.sk/
              Since Slovakia borders Austria, especially the main city of Bratislava, I checked with the above link to see whether or not my two associated surnames (great grandparents) are found there. But both results are negative. As I once said, my maternal grandfather's surname can be found in Germany, Austria, Czech Republic & Hungary.
              Last edited by PDHOTLEN; 25 February 2009, 03:23 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                Since Slovakia borders Austria, especially the main city of Bratislava, I checked with the above link to see whether or not my two associated surnames (great grandparents) are found there. But both results are negative. As I once said, my maternal grandfather's surname can be found in Germany, Austria, Czech Republic & Hungary.
                Of course, the ethnic Germans were deported in 1945.

                Still quite a few German names in that database, though.

                Regards,
                Jim

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                • #23
                  I did not know this

                  Originally posted by Jim Honeychuck View Post
                  Of course, the ethnic Germans were deported in 1945.

                  Still quite a few German names in that database, though.

                  Regards,
                  Jim
                  Thanks for the info

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                    I finally found out who my great-grandparents were on my maternal grandfather's side, i.e. the Austrians. I sent to Wisconsin for the death certificate of my grandfather's brother, and his parents (born & died in Austria) were listed. But there of course was no other info regarding them.
                    I have a copy of at least one US document that lists my great grandparents as Austrian. I can't remember which document it is. It's probably a death certificate.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                      Since Slovakia borders Austria, especially the main city of Bratislava, I checked with the above link to see whether or not my two associated surnames (great grandparents) are found there. But both results are negative. As I once said, my maternal grandfather's surname can be found in Germany, Austria, Czech Republic & Hungary.

                      I found my fathers surname in many countries from Ireland to Afganistan, and it is a word is some language used in Central Asia, the language that the armies used. Urdu?

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                      • #26
                        Urdu

                        Originally posted by rainbow View Post
                        Urdu?
                        Urdu. Are you sure? Have you looked Urdu up? It might me an interesting exercise. I ask are you sure only because so many names sound and look similar. For example, the Saxonase were similar enough to Saxon that some writers have suggested they were the same people. If they were the same people a West Iranian horse cavalry somehow ended up in Jutland. I will await your reply with baited breath. I love all things ancient and Near Eastern.

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                        • #27
                          RE Austrians

                          I think many ethnic German-Austrians moved back to Austria proper when the Austro-Hungarian Empire came crashing down after WWI. So I am wondering whether or not any of my Austrian ancestors were once out in the further reaches of the greater empire before its collapse, in which case "foreign" DNA may have been picked up during their sojourn in the outer reich.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Deirwha View Post
                            Urdu. Are you sure? Have you looked Urdu up? It might me an interesting exercise. I ask are you sure only because so many names sound and look similar. For example, the Saxonase were similar enough to Saxon that some writers have suggested they were the same people. If they were the same people a West Iranian horse cavalry somehow ended up in Jutland. I will await your reply with baited breath. I love all things ancient and Near Eastern.
                            It's a word in Urdu. I'm not saying what it is.

                            Only one person on ysearch has the same name as my father, and his ydna is the most common ydna haplogroup in southern slavic populations. I think it was I1 or something. Not R1b or a. And I do have DNA Tribes matches to Bosnia and Turkey (in my top 20), so I think it's plausible that my fathers ydna may be the same and that there was a Turkish or Central Asian or Urdu-speaking ancestor along his male line, and that the line wandered westward over the centuries.
                            My 17% Native American result from DNA Print could be a combination of Central Asian and Native American. I was told by DNA Print that CAs & NAs share some of the same markers. They are genetically the same. I do think/feel I have some Hun or Mongolian on my fathers side, even if it's just a smidgen.
                            Last edited by rainbow; 2 March 2009, 05:38 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by rainbow View Post
                              It's a word in Urdu. I'm not saying what it is.

                              Only one person on ysearch has the same name as my father, and his ydna is the most common ydna haplogroup in southern slavic populations. I think it was I1 or something. Not R1b or a. And I do have DNA Tribes matches to Bosnia and Turkey (in my top 20), so I think it's plausible that my fathers ydna may be the same and that there was a Turkish or Central Asian or Urdu-speaking ancestor along his male line, and that the line wandered westward over the centuries.
                              My 17% Native American result from DNA Print could be a combination of Central Asian and Native American. I was told by DNA Print that CAs & NAs share some of the same markers. They are genetically the same. I do think/feel I have some Hun or Mongolian on my fathers side, even if it's just a smidgen.
                              Rainbow,

                              Although you are primarily interested in Native American markers rather than Czech, DNA Tribes has just updated its reference populations to add another Czech sample population.

                              If you would like to look at the raw data rather than purchase a DNA Tribes update, I suspect the new data is this:
                              http://www.fsigenetics.com/article/S...003-9/abstract

                              Allele frequency data for 17 short tandem repeats in a Czech population sample, Halina Simkova et al.

                              Abstract

                              Allele frequencies for 17 short tandem repeats (STRs) autosomal loci (D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, CSF1PO, FGA, PentaD, PentaE, TH01, TPOX, vWA) were studied in an extensive sample (max. N=1411) of unrelated individuals originating from the Czech Republic. Population and forensic parameters were estimated. Except for FGA and Penta E loci, no deviations from the Hardy

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Jim Honeychuck View Post
                                Rainbow,

                                Although you are primarily interested in Native American markers rather than Czech, DNA Tribes has just updated its reference populations to add another Czech sample population.

                                If you would like to look at the raw data rather than purchase a DNA Tribes update, I suspect the new data is this:
                                http://www.fsigenetics.com/article/S...003-9/abstract

                                Allele frequency data for 17 short tandem repeats in a Czech population sample, Halina Simkova et al.

                                Abstract

                                Allele frequencies for 17 short tandem repeats (STRs) autosomal loci (D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, CSF1PO, FGA, PentaD, PentaE, TH01, TPOX, vWA) were studied in an extensive sample (max. N=1411) of unrelated individuals originating from the Czech Republic. Population and forensic parameters were estimated. Except for FGA and Penta E loci, no deviations from the Hardy
                                Thank you, Jim Honeychuck.

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