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  • rainbow
    replied
    (blush) you're welcome

    And who knows, maybe DNAPrint can even test from a lock or strand of hair. I haven't asked them that, but I think they could.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deirwha
    replied
    wow

    That is a great idea, Rainbow. Thank you from me. I have a number of such materials myself.

    Leave a comment:


  • rainbow
    replied
    Originally posted by jaynegen
    Thanks Rainbow for this idea. I know it's not new, but suggesting it made me think of my maternal grandfather, a brick wall genealogically speaking. There are no male descendants living, but my uncle may have sent letters, or even that grandfather himself. Goldmine!
    Your welcome!
    I thought it would be helpful to mention envelope (and stamp) testing.

    Leave a comment:


  • rucksack
    replied
    Originally posted by Oriel
    Bryan Sykes is professor of Human Genetics at Oxford University and founder of Oxfordancestors.I think he knows a lot more about genetics than some of the people writing on this forum.You can read about him at Wikipedia.

    Leave a comment:


  • jaynegen
    replied
    Envelopes

    Originally posted by rainbow
    A way to sample the deceased is thru envelopes they sent. I have saved letters & cards from my paternal grandmother and letters from my maternal grandmother. I hope to have the envelopes tested someday. Hopefully they sealed the envelopes themselves. I emailed DNAPrint/AncestryByDna and they said they can test from envelopes. The fee is $100 added to the regular testing cost.
    Thanks Rainbow for this idea. I know it's not new, but suggesting it made me think of my maternal grandfather, a brick wall genealogically speaking. There are no male descendants living, but my uncle may have sent letters, or even that grandfather himself. Goldmine!

    Leave a comment:


  • rainbow
    replied
    A way to sample the deceased is thru envelopes they sent. I have saved letters & cards from my paternal grandmother and letters from my maternal grandmother. I hope to have the envelopes tested someday. Hopefully they sealed the envelopes themselves. I emailed DNAPrint/AncestryByDna and they said they can test from envelopes. The fee is $100 added to the regular testing cost.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deirwha
    replied
    Or

    one can go to Dienekes' Anthropological Forum and view a whole host of articles by people who share with Prof Sykes a certain reputation in the field, not all of whom agree with him by any means. I have enjoyed reading this blog. It has provided the kind of small r research with small i information for which I have sought for several months, because I am not a geneticist. I am a lawyer. The blog provides authoritative expositions from highly qualified researchers. Very useful. BTW, I saw Ciao quoted there. Also DKF.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by cacio
    Thanks for the links. Interesting, I wonder whether they tested for H or just for selected HVR1. If it's CRS HVR1, it wouldn't necessary mean H, it's the same as Paglicci. Though it would further give a potential indication that some type of HV /R0 was in Europe this early, in contrast to some new ideas about H being younger and late-palaeolithic in Europe.

    Plus, was Sykes the same as the one about the Cheddar man publicity stunt? Or the Gengis Khan presumed C descendant (who was actually R1a)?

    cacio

    Bryan Sykes is professor of Human Genetics at Oxford University and founder of Oxfordancestors.I think he knows a lot more about genetics than some of the people writing on this forum.You can read about him at Wikipedia.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by cacio
    Thanks for the links. Interesting, I wonder whether they tested for H or just for selected HVR1. If it's CRS HVR1, it wouldn't necessary mean H, it's the same as Paglicci. Though it would further give a potential indication that some type of HV /R0 was in Europe this early, in contrast to some new ideas about H being younger and late-palaeolithic in Europe.

    Plus, was Sykes the same as the one about the Cheddar man publicity stunt? Or the Gengis Khan presumed C descendant (who was actually R1a)?

    cacio

    Bryan Sykes is professor of Human Genetics at Oxford University and founded Oxfordancestors.I think he knows a lot more about genetics than some of the people writing on this forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • derinos
    replied
    Originally posted by cacio
    Thanks for the links. Interesting, I wonder whether they tested for H or just for selected HVR1. If it's CRS HVR1, it wouldn't necessary mean H, it's the same as Paglicci. Though it would further give a potential indication that some type of HV /R0 was in Europe this early, in contrast to some new ideas about H being younger and late-palaeolithic in Europe.

    Plus, was Sykes the same as the one about the Cheddar man publicity stunt? Or the Gengis Khan presumed C descendant (who was actually R1a)?

    cacio

    1.I wrote last year to the identifiable sources but got no methodology specifics back; I guess they are still investigating and would not want to prejudice future publications; which in view of the location, & a pre-LGM warm-period date of origin, will be avidly followed!
    The remains were rather casually housed and preserved, until the fifties, when sporadic bone-dating technology updates attracted new attention. A pity the ceremonial mammoth skull was lost.

    2.Yes cacio, the same Sykes as in the Cheddar Man study hyperbole participated.
    A noteworthy study from his lab demonstrated the low (<24%) population replacement factor driving the great Neolithic cultural-artifactual spread across Europe. He sometimes consults for a commercial DNA testing company , oxfordancestors.co.uk.
    His flamboyant reporting style captivates the Anglophone public to study DNA, but irritates his peers; even more so when his solid findings happen to prevail in overheated scientific debate!

    Leave a comment:


  • Deirwha
    replied
    HooooRahhh

    I have been happily rummaging through the Blog noted previously. It has the kind of information for which I have been asking in easy to read and digest notes and links to other articles else where, from professional on line publications to notes on Rootsweb and elsewhere. I look forward to being able to keep up and better understand, now, the little r research for the little i information.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deirwha
    replied
    Studies

    A friend from my U198 group recommended a blog site, Dienekes. This site lists quite a bit of information and provides easy to use links to the 6 or so studies of ancient y-chromosomes. I noted with interest that DKF reported on a study of y DNA in an ancient German cave. I am going back and try to read the original report, although my German is pretty rusty. I forgot the rule on posting URLs but am going with the flow here.

    http://dienekes.blogspot.com/search/label/mtDNA
    Last edited by Deirwha; 3 December 2008, 02:11 PM. Reason: sentence of explanation

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    Thanks for the links. Interesting, I wonder whether they tested for H or just for selected HVR1. If it's CRS HVR1, it wouldn't necessary mean H, it's the same as Paglicci. Though it would further give a potential indication that some type of HV /R0 was in Europe this early, in contrast to some new ideas about H being younger and late-palaeolithic in Europe.

    Plus, was Sykes the same as the one about the Cheddar man publicity stunt? Or the Gengis Khan presumed C descendant (who was actually R1a)?

    cacio

    Leave a comment:


  • Deirwha
    replied
    Thank you

    fascinating. Must look into the Ladin Valley. The T looks familiar.

    Leave a comment:


  • derinos
    replied
    Red Lady, (or Prince) of Paviland

    For cacio; hope this will be of some use. They do not specify haplogrup "H" Mtdna in this paper, but I believe I read that elswhere. Prof Brian Sykes was the operant. Link follows:


    the Red Lady of [email protected]

    Leave a comment:

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