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Finns Among Anglo-Saxons?

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  • Finns Among Anglo-Saxons?

    In his 1906 book "Origin of the Anglo-Saxon Race" (pages 126-139), Thomas W Shore thought there could have been some Finns coming to Britain
    among the so called Danes:

    http://www.archive.org/stream/origin...osax00shoruoft

    I don't think so, because there is hardly any I1-Bothnia in Britain. Instead I believe western Finland received settlers from around the same area and the same time than eastern Britain got its Anglo-Saxons. Someone of a I1-AS haplogroup mutated later to I1-Bothnia.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Eki
    In his 1906 book "Origin of the Anglo-Saxon Race" (pages 126-139), Thomas W Shore thought there could have been some Finns coming to Britain
    among the so called Danes:

    http://www.archive.org/stream/origin...osax00shoruoft

    I don't think so, because there is hardly any I1-Bothnia in Britain. Instead I believe western Finland received settlers from around the same area and the same time than eastern Britain got its Anglo-Saxons. Someone of a I1-AS haplogroup mutated later to I1-Bothnia.
    And what about Y- haplogroup N, being found in Scotland and England?
    Were Finns among Vikings?

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    • #3
      Yes, right Karol haplogroup N is extremely prevalent in Finland. These guys like to travel, seems like they have been around the world and back again from where they came from but did not stop there and instead went to Finland. Most male Finlanders are clearly Asians of origin and so are actually the Noble women found in the Oseberg Viking Ship in Norway. The height of both these women was 152 cm and at least one of them had Asian feature according to physical anthropologists.

      One of these women had the Central Asian mtDNA U7. Male haplogroup N is definitively Asian, as R1a and R1b is Asian of origin. I do not think that there is any controversy about the R1a and the Saami I1a men they must have been Vikings. What about haplogroup N and R1b?

      There are still some women with this haplogroup on the Islands of the Angeles and even a few in Finland. I guess you can say that there ought to be some connection between the Finlanders and the Anglo -S.

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      • #4
        "Anglo-Saxon" is not a genetic term.

        Like many grouping terms utilised in writings on "recent" history, the term "Anglo-Saxon" is a cultural-locational descriptor, invented by relatively recent historians.
        So it is not surprising to find, on reviewing the DNA of such a grouping, that there is a sliding-scale mixture of contributory modal types.

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