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Genographics - 3 years Later

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  • #16
    Originally posted by efgen
    NG does not do any deep-SNP testing at all. They only test to whatever is considered the "backbone" level of the major haplogroups. An example of the backbone levels is provided on this FTDNA page, although there have been some adjustments since the page was written (ie, FTDNA and NG now consider J1 and J2 as separate backbone haplogroups) and it has not been updated to reflect the 2008 tree yet:

    http://www.familytreedna.com/snp_assurance.html

    Elise
    Elise,

    I support the work of NG/GP, but at the time I tested (about 2 years ago) GP did differentiate between J2 and "J" on their website. If they weren't doing any deep-snp testing, how did FTDNA immediately identify me as confirmed J1 with 304+, 267+ on my personal page, and not just predicted based on my haplotype?

    Vinnie

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    • #17
      Like I said before:
      They are NOT, I repeat,not, going to tell you the tricks of the trade.
      It would just be copied.
      I did donate my MTDNA to the (FTDNA) sciences. This is the full blown test.
      I hope it helps someone down the road.
      darroll

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      • #18
        Originally posted by vinnie
        Elise,

        I support the work of NG/GP, but at the time I tested (about 2 years ago) GP did differentiate between J2 and "J" on their website. If they weren't doing any deep-snp testing, how did FTDNA immediately identify me as confirmed J1 with 304+, 267+ on my personal page, and not just predicted based on my haplotype?

        Vinnie
        Vinnie,

        For the more common haplogroups, what FTDNA and GP consider as "backbone" haplogroups isn't always just the capital letter. For instance, they consider E, E3a and E3b to be backbone haplogroups. And I believe they now consider both J1 and J2 to be backbone haplogroups. Deep-SNP or deep-clade tests go beyond these backbone haplogroups to test for SNPs and subclades further downstream. So it doesn't take a deep-SNP test to determine J1 vs J2 -- it's just a backbone test. But it does take a deep-SNP test to determine if you're in a subclade of J1 or J2.

        Although you would have to contact FTDNA for an official explanation of why you were SNP-tested J1, but Genographic reported you as only J, here's my semi-educated guess:

        FTDNA apparently had to do a backbone SNP test to determine that you were J1 vs J2 (remember that FTDNA does all the testing for Genographic's public participation kits). However, I believe there was a time when many publications were reporting all JxJ2 (J not J2) as simply J, so Genographic reporting you as just J instead of your SNP-tested J1 would have been in line with that at the time. It also seems to take Genographic a little while longer than FTDNA to update their website with nomenclature changes, so maybe the Genographic website just hadn't been updated yet to show your J1. For instance, I understand that Genographic has not yet adopted the new 2008 nomenclature, while FTDNA has.

        Elise

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        • #19
          The Genographic (NG) site also has me listed as a "I".
          Please see my earlier posts.
          Do a search then enter darroll.
          TKS, d

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          • #20
            MtDNA H went to Central and East Asia about 30,000 years ago. Older than European H.

            I looked at the Genographic Project website again.
            It says MtDNA haplogroup H is considered a Western European haplogroup because it is the most common one in Europe, but says it is also found in 15% of people in Central Asia and in 5% of people in Northern Asia.
            It's estimated age in Europe is 10,000 to 15,000 years old, but in Central and East Asia it is estimated at 30,000 years old.

            https://www3.nationalgeographic.com/...hic/atlas.html
            To read it, click on 'genetic markers', then click on 'mtdna H'.

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