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  • R1b

    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
    I recently looked at Bryan Sykes book "Saxons, Vikings, and Celts" again. He gives an interesting account of early British history and mythology. His description of the "Danelaw" matches the map from the above message, where there was a truce between invader Danes and the Saxons.

    It looks like haplogroup I (Oisin) was the earliest Y-DNA haplogroup in Ireland, and i would guess in the British Isles in general. They were the husbands of mtHapogroup U5, by the looks of it.

    I also read Sykes book and he names "R1b" [Oisin].Most of the Irish tested are R1b (85%).

    Oriel

    Comment


    • Sykes confuses me

      Sykes confused me with his mythological names for haplogroups. He also refers to signature mutations, but does not say what those signature mutations for the various haplogroups are (for all of them).

      Since it looks like R1b originated somewhere in the east (along with R1a), I tended to regard it as a later arrival to the Britiish Isles.

      U5b2 & R1a1

      Comment


      • Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
        Sykes confused me with his mythological names for haplogroups. He also refers to signature mutations, but does not say what those signature mutations for the various haplogroups are (for all of them).

        Since it looks like R1b originated somewhere in the east (along with R1a), I tended to regard it as a later arrival to the Britiish Isles.

        U5b2 & R1a1

        Have you read "The Origins of the British" by Steven Oppenheimer?I think its a very good book.It makes a lot more sense of the haplogroups in Ireland as well as England.

        Oriel

        Comment


        • no, I haven't, but

          I'll see if I can latch on to a copy of "The Origins of the British."

          U5b2 & R1a1

          Comment


          • Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
            Sykes confused me with his mythological names for haplogroups. He also refers to signature mutations, but does not say what those signature mutations for the various haplogroups are (for all of them).

            Since it looks like R1b originated somewhere in the east (along with R1a), I tended to regard it as a later arrival to the Britiish Isles.

            U5b2 & R1a1
            It seems we all came from the east. Eurasia. Just at different times.


            Who were the Western Europeans prior the Younger Dryas Period?

            Was the then Western European population compromised because of the event in the following article.

            aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
            aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa



            Abundant tiny particles of diamond dust exist in sediments dating to 12,900 years ago at six North American sites, adding strong evidence for Earth's impact with a rare swarm of carbon-and-water-rich comets or carbonaceous chondrites, reports a nine-member scientific team.

            "The nanodiamonds that we found at all six locations exist only in sediments associated with the Younger Dryas Boundary layers, not above it or below it,"

            Nanometer-sized diamonds occur at the base a layer of sediment directly above the remains of extinct animals (mammoths, dire wolves, etc.) and artifacts from Clovis culture at the research site in Murray Springs, Arizona

            (more...)
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0101172136.htm

            Comment


            • Originally posted by M.O'Connor
              It seems we all came from the east. Eurasia. Just at different times.


              Who were the Western Europeans prior the Younger Dryas Period?

              Was the then Western European population compromised because of the event in the following article.

              aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
              aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa



              Abundant tiny particles of diamond dust exist in sediments dating to 12,900 years ago at six North American sites, adding strong evidence for Earth's impact with a rare swarm of carbon-and-water-rich comets or carbonaceous chondrites, reports a nine-member scientific team.

              "The nanodiamonds that we found at all six locations exist only in sediments associated with the Younger Dryas Boundary layers, not above it or below it,"

              Nanometer-sized diamonds occur at the base a layer of sediment directly above the remains of extinct animals (mammoths, dire wolves, etc.) and artifacts from Clovis culture at the research site in Murray Springs, Arizona

              (more...)
              http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0101172136.htm
              That is interesting.
              http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/tre...iamonds-comet/

              I'll put it in the American Indian thread.

              Comment


              • How do I participate in "Nordic R1a Y-DNA Project"

                Hello all,

                I found a reference at Wikipedia about a Nordic R1a Y-DNA Project. Unfortunately, I fail to find any references to managers of such a project, but there is a reference to this thread

                Do any of you have any more information about how I could register for participation? I will not check out this thread regularly, so please send me an email to [email protected] as well.

                FYI, I am R1b1, but one of my maternal uncles is R1a and his roots are traceable to Smaaland county, Sweden, so I would submit his data. He was tested by EthnoAncestry (and Oxford Ancestors further back), so any data would have to be submitted manually, I suppose.

                Best regards,
                Mikael Hammer

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Mikael Hammer View Post
                  Hello all,

                  I found a reference at Wikipedia about a Nordic R1a Y-DNA Project. Unfortunately, I fail to find any references to managers of such a project, but there is a reference to this thread

                  Do any of you have any more information about how I could register for participation? I will not check out this thread regularly, so please send me an email to [email protected] as well.

                  FYI, I am R1b1, but one of my maternal uncles is R1a and his roots are traceable to Smaaland county, Sweden, so I would submit his data. He was tested by EthnoAncestry (and Oxford Ancestors further back), so any data would have to be submitted manually, I suppose.

                  Best regards,
                  Mikael Hammer
                  Mikael (and others), the Nordic R1a YDNA project is not a FTDNA-project. It is a private Scandinavian language mailing list. Should any wish to gain access; please mail me at bljohnse at hotmail dot com. I can contact the administrators.

                  I am also aware of a Norwegian mailing list about Norwegian genetics in general. (only Norwegian language).

                  Comment


                  • I was made aware that there seems to be something wrong with the initial pdf. I am therefore trying to repost it.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • Paul - thank you, this is interesting.
                      As an N (N1c1), I'm curious about the nomenclature: The only 'N' map is labeled 'N3'. Can you (or anyone) tell me how that is used?

                      I haven't seen 'N3' used (N haplogroups in FTDNA include N, N1, N1a, N1b, N1b1, N1c,N1c1, N1c1a, N1c1b, N1c1c) Thanks!

                      Originally posted by Paul_Johnsen View Post
                      I was made aware that there seems to be something wrong with the initial pdf. I am therefore trying to repost it.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by dwight View Post
                        Paul - thank you, this is interesting.
                        As an N (N1c1), I'm curious about the nomenclature: The only 'N' map is labeled 'N3'. Can you (or anyone) tell me how that is used?

                        I haven't seen 'N3' used (N haplogroups in FTDNA include N, N1, N1a, N1b, N1b1, N1c,N1c1, N1c1a, N1c1b, N1c1c) Thanks!
                        I made the map in 2006. Back then N1c1 was known as N3.

                        my predicted 'I1a' would today be known as 'I1'
                        my predicted 'I1c' would today be known as 'I2b1'

                        Comment


                        • Good to know - did not know that.

                          Originally posted by Paul_Johnsen View Post
                          I made the map in 2006. Back then N1c1 was known as N3.

                          my predicted 'I1a' would today be known as 'I1'
                          my predicted 'I1c' would today be known as 'I2b1'

                          Comment

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