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Definition of mtDNA Haplogroup I

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  • #16
    Originally posted by britzkrieg
    I have had my HVR2 region sequenced as well. Now I just have to wait for that European exact match to pop up.
    In addition to mitosearch, I usually also recommend searching SMGF and EMPOP.

    http://www.smgf.org/mtdna/search.jspx
    http://www.empop.org/

    Both are good resources for tracking down general matches, and sometimes helping to find geographic patterns. Both are designed to be anonymous, unlike mitosearch, but they can still be useful.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by vraatyah
      The answer is likely to be "NO" unless you limit your search to the same location where your line was first documented.
      My roots in the United States are very deep. I believe all my ancestors were here by the beginning of the Revolution in 1776. That makes it tougher to find the immigrants.

      Rumor has it that the father of my earliest known maternal ancestor immigrated from England. That doesn't mean that her mother came from England, too, of course. Still, I'm concentrating on the British Isles for now.

      britzkrieg

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      • #18
        Originally posted by britzkrieg
        My roots in the United States are very deep. I believe all my ancestors were here by the beginning of the Revolution in 1776. That makes it tougher to find the immigrants.

        Rumor has it that the father of my earliest known maternal ancestor immigrated from England. That doesn't mean that her mother came from England, too, of course. Still, I'm concentrating on the British Isles for now.
        Very interesting. I believe, though your research is not easy, it's by no means desperate. A lineage can be rare in Brittain but more frequent in the USA and vice versa, due to the drift events. It's hardly to be the case for the common, usual lineages (those escalated in the ancient times), but it's very expected for the rare ones. 200 years ago, when USA was first populated by Europeans, the English population were more strongly subdivided then now, so there could be migrations that "wiped" some lineages from the mother country, particularly those were present only in remote areas.

        As Vincent mentioned, we should wait for more results of Sykes project, he seems to be the only author seriously interested in study of England population subdivision. I think, it's the right way


        with best regards from Russia

        Valery

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        • #19
          Originally posted by vineviz
          In addition to mitosearch, I usually also recommend searching SMGF and EMPOP.

          http://www.smgf.org/mtdna/search.jspx
          http://www.empop.org/

          Both are good resources for tracking down general matches, and sometimes helping to find geographic patterns. Both are designed to be anonymous, unlike mitosearch, but they can still be useful.
          empop seems to be more useful for the Americans - I believe, Dr Parson will keep it up to date, he is one of the main contributors to the SWGDAM forensic database.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by britzkrieg
            The 293 mutation I found in the profile in question is actually 2931. I have no clue what that extra "1" is supposed to mean
            Just to mention, Sykes uses a weird notation, which can be found at the beginning of the mtdna pdf file. Transitions are only stated with the last three digits of the position (eg 189 and the like). Transversions are represented by the last three digit of the position, followed by a number 1 to 9, which is supposed to say which transversions (or insertions or deletions) they are.

            In particular, 1=A-C , so vraatyah was right, 2931 means A16293C
            No insertions or deletions here (this would be number 9)

            cacio

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            • #21
              Originally posted by cacio
              Just to mention, Sykes uses a weird notation, which can be found at the beginning of the mtdna pdf file... vraatyah was right, 2931 means A16293C. No insertions or deletions here...
              Thanks, cacio. I could've figured that out myself if I'd bothered to read the introduction. I guess I was too focused on the single line with the Welsh "match." Anyway, thanks for clearing that up.

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              • #22
                mtdna I

                You are probably familiar with this haplogoup table already at http://www.stats.gla.ac.uk/~vincent/...000/motif.html .... I found it on roots web genealogy-dna-L regarding haplogroups N1 vs. A2 vs. D3... it appears that N is defined differently than you have seen it... does anyone know of a more current haplogroup motif table?

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                • #23
                  Jenny:

                  I think now assignments are mostly made on the basis of coding region mutations rather than HVR1, so I don't think there exist a more updated table like that. Probably my favorite place to look at would be Ian Logan's page:
                  http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/mtDNA.htm

                  for a quicker thing, there is a paper by Palanichamy for N in general:
                  http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi...10.1086/425871
                  and for H there is a paper by Roostalu et al (I believe).

                  cacio

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