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  • Details on Genographic Project Participation Numbers

    I was looking for information on how many people have participated in the National Geographic Genographic Project but they are nowhere to be found on the NG site. Does anyone know how the project is progressing both in terms of folks like me who paid to participate, as well as for native peoples who are participating?

    Lisa

  • #2
    Lisa:

    I went to a presentation by Wells in december, and he said that around 180,000 people have bought the geno project kit. Very many, but of course, they are predominantly Americans of European origin. As for the scientific part of the project, financed by the sales of kit and NG, he said they had around 15-20,000, from various parts of the world. One problem area was Native Americans, who seem to have some concerns and are often refusing to participate (this was also publicized in the news).

    Unfortunately, no paper has been published yet based on these samples. In the talk, Wells mentioned two studies, which seemed ready. One on Chad (he claims Y chromosome data on Chad shows prehistoric movement from the Middle East. But alas, he didn't say about which haplogroups he found there). Another on some Negrito group in the Philipines, that is mostly Y-chromosome K something (which by the way is known to be present throughout Indonesia, Melanesia etc). He also showed footage (for a possible new documentary?) from Tajikistan, but it didn't look like they had analyzed the sample yet. As for me, I'd be quite interested in the collection of sample they're doing in the Middle East (N Africa, Lebanon etc.), since both my Y and my mtdna seem to originate there. But Wells didn't say anything about what was going on with that.

    cacio

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    • #3
      I had read about the reticence of Native Americans as well as some other Native people to be part of the project because migration is at odds with their creation stories. I got the Deep Ancestry book for Christmas and enjoyed reading it, especially since Wells' grandmother was mtDNA haplogroup J, which is my group. They also came out of the Middle Eastern Levant region.

      My husband is Filipino and is yDNA O3, which is primarily found in Chinese men. I'm interested in any findings from the Philippines.

      I hope that they put something together soon. I'd love to see Spencer Wells speak. Does he have a lecture tour?

      Thanks,
      Lisa

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      • #4
        Lisa:

        Wells's was a lecture at the National Geographic here in DC. It was fun to see him, but, as said, the lecture was not very informative, it was probably material from the book, plus these snippets from the forthcoming research.

        As for the Philippines, the only paper I can think of is the following (see the .doc supplementary table):
        http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/co...ull/msl093/DC1

        which has a tiny sample of 39 people from the Philippines. Not very many, but the paper is about Polynesia and Melanesia. Anyway, as expected, O is the dominant haplogroup. The K I was referring to was in fact found in a Negrito population. The earliest inhabitants of the isles were presumably C, D (?) and K, but the later migration of O's from China must have swamped them. I would bet there are more recent and more complete papers, but I know little about East Asia. May be someone else can pitch in here.

        cacio

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cacio
          I went to a presentation by Wells in december, and he said that around 180,000 people have bought the geno project kit.
          And of these, only a little over 40,000 have transferred their results to FTDNA, thus actually joining our community. I suspect that even fewer have entered their results into Ysearch.

          I do hope that at some point, the genetics community will have access to the results of all participants, both paid and research. Not names, just ancestral cities, haplotypes, and haplogroups.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lgmayka
            And of these, only a little over 40,000 have transferred their results to FTDNA, thus actually joining our community. I suspect that even fewer have entered their results into Ysearch.

            I do hope that at some point, the genetics community will have access to the results of all participants, both paid and research. Not names, just ancestral cities, haplotypes, and haplogroups.
            It's too bad that more people didn't take the time to hit the upload button and participate. Why bother participating at all if you're not going to be part of a larger picture.

            How long will the project at Nat'l Geo. run? When will the final results be published?

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