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  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    I was hoping to read more about R1b1c. Still, it was an interesting day of reading. I like the way the tree seems to organize itself.

    Leave a comment:


  • Svein Davidsen
    replied
    Time line for Y-chromosome mutations according to "Deep Ancestry".

    In the attached .doc I have tried to summarize the timeline for the y-chromosome mutations as described in the Appendix in Dr Spencer's book.

    I would be grateful if you notify me of any mistakes. In case the link doesn't work email me and I'll mail you a copy.

    Also:
    A happy and prosperous New Year to you all!

    Svein
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Jambalaia32
    replied
    Who's Saxon,Celt,and Viking?

    The only thing I want to know from the book is what tribe do they consider Mt K to be, the Saxons ,or the Celts,or the Vikings?? I want to know who to identify with! Which one of the Brits am I? I like all folks though-I like a lot of Celts guys.



    PS-OOPs I THOUGHT YOU WERE TALKING ABOUT BRIAN SYKES' NEW BOOK ON THE PEOPLING OF BRITISH ISLES. DID ANYBODY READ THAT YET ?
    Last edited by Jambalaia32; 1 January 2007, 03:40 PM. Reason: Add a sentence

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  • Andrew M
    replied
    It was 32 Canadian smackers to buy the hard-copy of the book. It had lots of pages but publishers used the same trick I tried to get by with in my Grade 10 term papers--just a few sentences for each page.

    Anyway, when my family refused to finance my purchase, I sped-read the book. It made for an interesting magazine article, but the "Liz Talor Camera" approach didn't give me any details that I would have wanted. There wasn't as much dimension as there was to "The Journey of Man." There was actually a longer section of paragraphs basically taken from the Genographic site. Page after page was taken up with "Haplogroup R originated X thousand years ago...yada, yada, yada." Illustrations were hybrids of the sunny-side up diagarams from scientific papers. For instance, E3b1 was mushed together with the other E3bs based on some sort of forumula to get an average.

    It is a pretty good summary of what has gone on so far in the project, but in this day of breaking news (or CNN's appeal of "it's live so it must be true") I get more satisfaction Googling the information.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregKiroKH2
    replied
    I am on page 14. I guess I am looking at the references as well as other references too Just what I wanted to do for Christmas.

    (Of course, the Star Trek: Voyager reruns are interesting too).

    Leave a comment:


  • 29149
    replied
    New book

    Originally posted by Johnserrat
    Does Wells provide any analysis of data obtained from the GP in this book?

    John
    I got the book for $22.80 from Amazon (including $6.50 for S&H to Canada), otherwise the book costs $24 flat. Just read 85 pages out of 246, interesting read. So far it just mentioned that the GP has collected almost 160,000 samples at the time the book was published.

    Leave a comment:


  • paitenceofjob
    replied
    Originally posted by Andrew M
    Any yips about YAP (this time around)?
    There are a couple yips about YAP.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andrew M
    replied
    Any yips about YAP (this time around)?

    Leave a comment:


  • paitenceofjob
    replied
    Originally posted by Johnserrat
    Does Wells provide any analysis of data obtained from the GP in this book?

    John
    John,

    The short answer to that, as far as I can tell, is no.

    The book lacks a bibliography and footnotes or endnotes. I don't see any raw data listed anywhere, but he does discuss haplogroup frequencies and what that implies about earlier migrations. It also has a lot of nice figures, the sources of which are listed on p. 241. I don't know which figure includes data from which publication nor whether data from the Genographic Project are included. Maybe someone else can say, but I don't see it.

    Wells lays out the goals, plans, and challenges for the Genographic Project, but I haven't got there yet. Though the book is rather small, I'm a slow reader.

    Hopefully, the next book includes more documentation and raw data.

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnserrat
    replied
    Originally posted by paitenceofjob
    I just got my copy today, along with Oppenherimer's book. I couldn't resist starting with Wells' book, though both of them look interesting. So far, the reading has been great. I haven't gotten too far yet. So far, Wells explains how the dna tests work. He ties in individuals' test results with information about the particular haplogroups. If you enjoyed Journey of Man, you'll love this book. He also has some nice maps that show the dispersals for many of the haplogroups, both y-dna and mtdna.

    Aside from the reading, the cover of the book looks nice too. It has an imprint of a little homo sapien walking across it. The book was a little smaller than I expected, but it looks like it's chock full of information and will be, like the Journey of Man, a book I'll read again and again.
    Does Wells provide any analysis of data obtained from the GP in this book?

    John

    Leave a comment:


  • paitenceofjob
    replied
    I just got my copy today, along with Oppenherimer's book. I couldn't resist starting with Wells' book, though both of them look interesting. So far, the reading has been great. I haven't gotten too far yet. So far, Wells explains how the dna tests work. He ties in individuals' test results with information about the particular haplogroups. If you enjoyed Journey of Man, you'll love this book. He also has some nice maps that show the dispersals for many of the haplogroups, both y-dna and mtdna.

    Aside from the reading, the cover of the book looks nice too. It has an imprint of a little homo sapien walking across it. The book was a little smaller than I expected, but it looks like it's chock full of information and will be, like the Journey of Man, a book I'll read again and again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arch Yeomans
    replied
    Cro Magnon

    Originally posted by nas
    Hello,
    I hope they can tell us something more about the Cro-Magnon(and his Dna).
    Nas
    I think they'll get more out of Filet Mignon then they will out of Cro-Magnon. I think the DNA might be totally degraded, except his mtDNA if it's in good shape; blahh mtDNA!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Arch Yeomans
    replied
    argghhh...

    Originally posted by ragnar
    Spencer Wells new book - Deep Ancestry:Inside the Genographic Project comes to Amazon in hardcover on Nov. 11. Brian Sykes new book comes to Amazon Dec. 4. You can pre-order.
    No more new books, new DVDs, new clothing, no more new nothing!!!!!!!!

    I'm spending way way too much money on half-arsed information and Christmas shopping just around the corner is already killing me.

    It's all I can stands, and I can't stands no more.

    I just wished these brainiac scientists would really collect, analyze, and deeply scrutinize before they start writing books about all their guesses. Heck I could do a better job at that.

    Leave a comment:


  • ragnar
    replied
    Lgmayka, they must be selling a pre-version, since it even says it will be published 11/21. The info paragraph about what's in it doesn't sound promising to me. I hope he ties in these examples with solid info of the project's results.

    Leave a comment:


  • nas
    replied
    The new books.

    Originally posted by ragnar
    Spencer Wells new book - Deep Ancestry:Inside the Genographic Project comes to Amazon in hardcover on Nov. 11. Brian Sykes new book comes to Amazon Dec. 4. You can pre-order.
    Hello,
    I hope they can tell us something more about the Cro-Magnon(and his Dna).
    Nas

    Leave a comment:

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