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American Indian admixture in White Americans

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  • #91
    Algonquian counting.

    Here are some Eastern Algonquian Powatan (Wahansenecawh) counting words:

    1. necut 1
    2. nungh 2
    3. nuss 3
    4. yowgh 4
    5. paranske 5
    6. comotinch 6
    7. toppawoss 7
    8. nusswash 8
    9. kekatawgh 9
    10. keskek 10
    11. case How many?
    12. ninghsapooeksku 20
    13. nussapooeksku 30
    14. yowghpooeksku 40
    15. parankestassapooeksku 50
    16. comotinchtassapooeksku 60
    17. toppawosstassapooeksku 70
    18. nusswashtassapooeksku 80
    19. kekatauwghtassapooeksku 90
    20. necuttoughtysinough 100
    21. necuttwevnquaough 1000

    Maria

    Comment


    • #92
      Eastern Algonquian Seasons.

      Here are the words and meanings for the seasons that the Powatan (Wahansenecawh) tribes observed.

      1. Popanow Winter
      2. Cattapeuk Spring
      3. Cohattayough Summer
      4. Nepinough The earing of their corne
      5. Taquitock The harvest and the fall of leafe.

      Maria

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by Maria_W
        Where is the orginal thread starter Omar? Haven't seen anymore posting from him. Did he loose interest?
        Here is a little more Potowomecke history.
        Hello Maria!!

        No, I have not loose interest at all. It is just that at one time I though nobody will contribute more to the thread. Today I came back and I was amazed with the amount of information you got here.

        Just to help to the forum, I will tell you that in my country is mestizo (Meti) by definition. That's the official way we talk about ourselves. Besides, our ethnic natives still preserve theirs language, religion and traditions and deffend them strongly. We have two main groups of Natives still living traditional lives. In the North we have aymaraes (the fellows with the llamas) who are very easy going people and polite. In the South we have the Mapuches, who are a warrior people and that are extremely proud of themselves.

        As I said, the general Chilean population is admixed, and that happened in all social classes. This is a study, to enhance the idea.

        DYS19 and DYS199 loci in a Chilean population of mixed ancestry.Cifuentes L, Morales R, Sepulveda D, Jorquera H, Acuna M.
        Programa de Genetica Humana, ICBM, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 7, Chile. [email protected]

        The current Chilean population originated from admixture between aboriginal populations (Amerindians) and Spanish conquerors of European origin. Consequently, the unions that gave rise to the Chilean population were chiefly between Spanish males and aboriginal females, and not the converse. To test the hypothesis that the Y chromosome of the Chilean population is mainly of Spanish origin, while the other chromosomes are from mixed (European and aboriginal) origin, we studied the DYS19 and DYS199 loci in two samples. One sample was obtained from a high socioeconomic stratum, while a second sample was from a low stratum. We studied male blood donors (N = 187) from Santiago, the capital of the country. Subjects were typed for the autosomal ABO and Rh (locus D) blood groups, and for the Y-linked DYS19 and the DYS199 loci, reported as Y-chromosome haplotypes. The aboriginal admixture was estimated for each genetic marker. The percentage of aboriginal admixture was 38.17% for the ABO system and 31.28% for the Rh system in the low socioeconomic stratum and 19.22% and 22.5%, respectively, in the high stratum. Y-chromosome haplotype frequencies constructed from the DYS19 and DYS199 loci demonstrated that the main haplotypes were DYS19*14/DYS199 C, as is often the case with many European populations, and DYS19*13/DYS199 C. The aboriginal admixture from Y-haplotype frequencies was estimated to be 15.83% in the low socioeconomic stratum and 6.91% in the high stratum. These values are lower than the values found using autosomal genetic markers, and are consistent with the historical background of the population studied. This study highlights the population genetic consequences of the asymmetric pattern of genome admixture between two ancestral populations (European and Amerindian). Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


        I have amazed with the thread. I live all the posts, and it called me the attention that many Americans actually are looking for this information. Finally, the information about Brazil and the Tupi-Guarani Natives, is superb.

        Best Regard,

        Omar Vega

        Comment


        • #94
          Great subject!

          Hi. Kawashkar.

          Yes, your thread is still active. Good subject! As you can see they are alot of us that are admixed between the Native American people and other countries. Will post more later, on the way out!
          Maria

          Comment


          • #95
            Virginia Algonquian groups

            The following list of Virginia Algonquian groups is based on the accounts of English settlers, who interest lay primarily in Indian military power. The location of these capital towns, if any , is shown in Smiths map and any relavent archological reports on these towns are cited. Pronunciation and spelling are of the modern ones still found in Virginia place-names, unless otherwise specified. The list begins with north-south sweep down the eastern shore, then moves up the southwestern bank of the James, down the northeastern bank of the James, and so on to the Potomac.

            Here is the meaning of some places:

            Tribe - Meaning- Pronunciation

            Occohannock (?) (orginally spelled Accohannock, ah-co-ha-nock)
            Accomac (Across the water) (ack-o-mack )
            Chesapeake (Big Salt Bay) che-a-peak
            Nansemond (?) nan-sa-mund
            Warraskoyack (?) (Name now obsolete, possibly wa-ra-skoik)
            Quiyoughcohannock (?) ( Name now obsolete, possibly kwee-o-co-han-nock)
            Weyanock (At the bend) (Now spelled Weyanoke, wye-a-noke)
            Appamattuck (Trap fishing or a waiting place.) (Now spelled Appomattox, ap-po-mat-tux)
            Powhatan (Preists town or town at the falls) (Possibly, formerly po-ha-tan, now pow-a-tan)
            Arrohateck (?) (Name now obsolete, possibly ar-ro-ha-teck)
            Chickahominy (Crushed corn people) (chick-a-hom-a-nee)
            Pasphegh (At the mouth of a stream) (Name now obsolete, pa-spa-hay)
            Kecoughtan (?) kih-co-tan
            Chiskiack (?) (or Kiskiack, name now obsolete, probably chih-ski-ack)
            Youngtanoud (?) (Name now obsolete, probably yo-ta-nund)
            Pamukey (?) (pa-mun-kee)
            Mattapanient (Landing place) (Changed to Mattaponi, mat-a-po-nye)
            Werowocomoco (Kingshowse) (Name now obsolete, weh-ro-wo-com-o-co)
            Piankatank (?) (Or Payankatank or Peanketank, pa-yank-a-tank )
            Opiscopank (?) (Or Opiscatumek, changed to Piscataway, pih-scat-a-way)
            Nandtaughtacund (?) (Possibly changed to Nanzatico, nan-zat-i-co)
            Cuttatawomen (?) ( Name obsolete in that area)
            Pissaseck (?) (Name now obsolete)
            Rappahanock (?) (Or Toppahannock, rap-a-han-nock )
            Moraughtaund (?) Changed to Morattico, mo-rat-i-co. So orginal probably was mo-raw-ta-cund.)
            Cuttatawomen (?) (Different from above Cuttatawomen. Changed to Corrotomen, cur-rotoh-man. Oringinal was probably pronounced cuh-ta-tah-wo-man. )
            Wiccocomico (House or town at the end) (Changed to Wicomico, wi-com-i-co. The orginal was probably wi-co-com-i-co)
            Sekakawon (?) (Or Sicacawoni, changed first to Chickacone, and then to Coan)
            Onawmanient (?) (Changed to Nomini, no-min-ee. The original was probably o-naw-man-i-ent)
            Patawomeck (Trading place) (Changed to Potomac, pot-toh-mack. Original was probably pa-taw-o-meck. North of Accokeek Creek, Stafford Cty.)

            Maria

            Comment


            • #96
              mixing in...

              Even tho this thread is very old, I'm letting myself fall to the temptation to add another 2 cents worth.

              The only exact match seen at Mitosearch for my U5 HVR1 (16270 & 16519) is a woman from England. In the footnote section, it says her maternal ancestor was a Tuscarora (i.e. Iroquois). Since it's commonly accepted that haplogroup U5 is European, I imagine that ancestor was an Indian captive. She wasn't tested for HVR2.

              It seems rather well known that Indians who took up "white mans'" ways and settled into society were treated as American citizens. For example, many Creeks in the south settled down, built cabins and turned to farming.

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
                ..
                It seems rather well known that Indians who took up "white mans'" ways and settled into society were treated as American citizens. For example, many Creeks in the south settled down, built cabins and turned to farming.
                Do you have more information about the Indians who took up "white man's" ways? How many were they. In which part of the United States that happened. Are any general studies to look up?

                Omar Vega,
                Chilean

                Comment


                • #98
                  The Creeks were mostly in the Deep South, Mississippi, west and south Alabama, south Georgia, and then some mixed with other Indians and became the Seminoles in Florida. The Cherokee were in Northern and eastern Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, Kentucky and Tennessee, especially the Blue Ridge Mtns. The Cherokees who didn't/wouldn't mix stayed in the mtns. The rest went down into Georgia and Alabama. But alot of these who were successful farmers (and some were slaveowners) still got rounded up and sent to Oklahoma. The Cherokees took this to court and the judge ruled in their favor to let them stay on their land but Andrew Jackson dared the judge to enforce the ruling. The Trail of Tears followed. But there were still plenty who had completely blended in and went unnoticed and were not relocated. It was about land, greed for land.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    P.S.
                    Keep in mind the SouthEastern indians, were not nomads. they had permanent villages and farmed. The men would travel to certain hunting grounds nearby, in the winter, but there was no real "traveling with the herd". That was done by the Plains Indians, Sioux, Apache, and others. Thats why they lived in tepees that could be folded up and moved really quick. The Eastern Indians lived in huts or cabins.

                    Comment


                    • Thanks,

                      Where I can find more detailed information about this?

                      I believe hollywood is in part guilty of making people believe worldwide that all the Indians of the U.S. were nomads of the plains.

                      I am interested in what happened to the natives that addopted to the "the white man's ways", particularly about theirs demography. I have the suspiction that many (if not most) of the Natives of the East coast of United States assimilated to the mainstream in a rather boring manner that history didn't pay much attention to it.

                      There is the stereotype that admixture between Europeans and Indians only happened in Hispanic America, but genetic studies show that also happened in mass in Brazil, the Caribbean and Canada. I wonder why the United States would be the exception. Particularly when there are lot of White Americans that carry Amerindian markers.

                      I would like to know more about the topic, and thanks for the info.

                      Regards,

                      Omar Vega,
                      Chilean

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by kawashkar
                        Thanks,

                        Where I can find more detailed information about this?

                        I believe hollywood is in part guilty of making people believe worldwide that all the Indians of the U.S. were nomads of the plains.

                        I am interested in what happened to the natives that addopted to the "the white man's ways", particularly about theirs demography. I have the suspiction that many (if not most) of the Natives of the East coast of United States assimilated to the mainstream in a rather boring manner that history didn't pay much attention to it.

                        There is the stereotype that admixture between Europeans and Indians only happened in Hispanic America, but genetic studies show that also happened in mass in Brazil, the Caribbean and Canada. I wonder why the United States would be the exception. Particularly when there are lot of White Americans that carry Amerindian markers.

                        I would like to know more about the topic, and thanks for the info.

                        Regards,

                        Omar Vega,
                        Chilean

                        I just jumped to the last page of this topic. My dna test from ancestry by dna says i'm 17% Native American, 83% European. There is no history of American Indian ancestry in my family. My mom tested with ancestry by dna and she has 00% Native American. That must mean that my father would be about 34% Native American. Since his father was Czech, I deduced that it must be from my paternal grandmother, whose family has been in New York & New Jersey since the 1600s. She must be about 68% If that is true, then there must be a huge percentage of white Americans, whose family was here since the 1600s, with unknown native american heritage. Either that or ancestry by dna is wrong. My dnatribes gave me no matches to native american indians. Dnatribes matched me to turkey, greece, italy, pakistan, syria, egypt, and MAORI None of my ancestors came from there. My ancestors came from the British Isles, Holland and the Czech/Slovak region. I'm 1/4 Czech, 3/4 British& Dutch. One greatgrandmother was born in what is today Slovakia. I have her birth record. My one Czech greatgrandfather can't be found, no European documents. I have 7 pages of non-american matches in my dnatribes extended report.
                        rainbow
                        FTDNA Customer
                        Last edited by rainbow; 8 April 2007, 04:38 PM.

                        Comment


                        • I'm about useless re research

                          I used to be interested in "Indians", i.e. the noble savage, when I was young. I've read this and that over the years, but can't say where I've accumulated my ideas.

                          My parents were from Wisconsin, although I wasn't born there myself. But I lived in Madison, Wisconsin from 5 to 15 years old. Then we moved to Florida, because my dad thought that was the land of milk and honey. I went into the army after high school, partly to get away from Florida.

                          What I'm leading up to is my bits and pieces about encountering people who say they were Indian/part Indian. For example, when I had a job in a grocery store in Sarasota, Florida in the early 1950's, I worked for a time with a woman who said she was Creek. Although she had white skin, her hair was black. When I was stationed at Fort Stewart, Goergia in 1959 & 60, there were two different women who said they were, or looked like Indians. One had a daughter in college, who also looked Indian (compared with the uusual local "Anglos"). That was before other minorities infiltrated into that area.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by rainbow
                            I just jumped to the last page of this topic. My dna test from ancestry by dna says i'm 17% Native American, 83% European. There is no history of American Indian ancestry in my family. My mom tested with ancestry by dna and she has 00% Native American. That must mean that my father would be about 34% Native American. Since his father was Czech, I deduced that it must be from my paternal grandmother, whose family has been in New York & New Jersey since the 1600s. She must be about 68% If that is true, then there must be a huge percentage of white Americans, whose family was here since the 1600s, with unknown native american heritage. Either that or ancestry by dna is wrong. My dnatribes gave me no matches to native american indians. Dnatribes matched me to turkey, greece, italy, pakistan, syria, egypt, and MAORI None of my ancestors came from there. My ancestors came from the British Isles, Holland and the Czech/Slovak region. I'm 1/4 Czech, 3/4 British& Dutch. One greatgrandmother was born in what is today Slovakia. I have her birth record. My one Czech greatgrandfather can't be found, no European documents. I have 7 pages of non-american matches in my dnatribes extended report.
                            Well, I guess you have a problem of concept. If you tested mtDNA or if you are male and tested Y-Chromosomes, the heritage is not "diluted". You just can't calculate that if you "have" 17% of Native American it means some of your parents was 34% native American. It just does not work that way. If you have a single Amerindian female in the direct female line, and is one between 1023 European ancestors, your mtDNA will mark Native American.

                            Anyways, if you come from Easter Europe, chances are your "Native" DNA is Mongolian or Turk. No kidding. To figure out, check for your specific tests and start to study the topic, which is quite complex.

                            Omar Vega

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
                              I used to be interested in "Indians", i.e. the noble savage, when I was young. I've read this and that over the years, but can't say where I've accumulated my ideas.

                              My parents were from Wisconsin, although I wasn't born there myself. But I lived in Madison, Wisconsin from 5 to 15 years old. Then we moved to Florida, because my dad thought that was the land of milk and honey. I went into the army after high school, partly to get away from Florida.

                              What I'm leading up to is my bits and pieces about encountering people who say they were Indian/part Indian. For example, when I had a job in a grocery store in Sarasota, Florida in the early 1950's, I worked for a time with a woman who said she was Creek. Although she had white skin, her hair was black. When I was stationed at Fort Stewart, Goergia in 1959 & 60, there were two different women who said they were, or looked like Indians. One had a daughter in college, who also looked Indian (compared with the uusual local "Anglos"). That was before other minorities infiltrated into that area.
                              The aspect of a person does not tell much about its ancestry. A descendent of Native American could look like a German without problem, and many people do. Some studies point out that White Americans have an important percentage of Native American genetics on them. What happens is that many people assimilated and forgot theirs roots. That's all.

                              Comment


                              • somewhat off subject (SE Georgia)

                                To give an idea what southeast Georgia was like in 1959 & 60, recall that the AAA put that area off limits! County sheriffs near Fort Stewart, GA were waiting in ambush, so to speak, for any prosperous-looking car with a Yankee license plate. That was before the interstate highway was completed so as to allow safe passage through that red-neck country. And I can think of only one contact with a Black American, off post, during the whole time I was stuck there. Social segregation was the norm, outside the post gates.

                                Comment

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