Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gypsy DNA

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • cacio
    replied
    Stevo:

    Gresham only tests for M170, not subgroups. He does provide a set of 8 STR markers, so may be it's possible to infer from those, but I'm not familiar with this type of analysis. Kalaydjeva tests even less; but she also provides some STRs.

    It seems to me reasonable to assume that Y hap H and mtdna M in Europe have a high probability of being gypsy. One could have hypothesized the same of my own haplogroup L, but so far L has not been found among the gypsies. (Moreover, while L is present at appreciable percentages from India to Anatolia, H is not.) From these previous two posts it seems though that gypsy groups may be more heterogeneous than what the Gresham and Kalaydjeva paper seem to imply.

    cacio

    Leave a comment:


  • Kaiser
    replied
    The Indian YDNA 'H' and mtDNA 'M' dominate amongst the Roma, at nearly 50% and 25% respectively. Additionally, there is a smattering of I, J, & R sub-clades. Linguistic affinity with the Punjabis cannot go unnoticed as many words are comprehensible in meaning and pronunciation.

    A sub-group of the Roma is known as Sinte (or Sinti) who had moved from their original homeland in South Asia to erstwhile East Germany from where they were re-located to Uzbekistan by the Communist regime. The Sinti males have R2 as the dominant haplogroup at a high frequency of 50%. Like H, R2 is an indigenous South Asian YDNA haplogroup. (Outside South Asia, R2 has spikes amongst Chechens and Kurdish populations.)

    It seems that each of the two dominant Indian male haplogroups ie, H & R2 are well represented amongst the 'wandering nomads' who can be seen as a minor third category, in addition to castes and tribes. In South Asia, the gypsies are known as Banjara, Changar, Odh, etc and their social behaviour is pretty much the same as that of European Roma.
    Last edited by Kaiser; 25 June 2006, 11:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marttinen
    replied
    I remember a recent article I read that placed Macedonian Roma as 44% E3b1. This was the greatest percentage of E3b1's in the Balkans (maybe even in Europe) outside of the Kosovar Albanians.

    Now, about mtDNA. Would it be a good chance that someone who is from an established family in Europe (in this case, France) and is Haplogroup M* would have a genetic connection to the Roma?

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by cacio
    Sorry Victor, I didn't see your post before I submitted.

    Looking at the data, one would think that the Indian component is essentially only H. The other major Indian groups (R1a, R2, L) seem small or absent,
    and this even more after accounting for the fact that Eastern Europe has a lot of R1as. J's are present in India but could have been picked up in the Middle East.

    What puzzles me is Haplogroup I. Haplogroup I is very non Indian. Could it be sign of an admixture in the Balkans? I is found also (5/20) in their smaller Spanish Roma sample.

    I didn't write down the mtdna data. Lots of M's (Indian), but also many H, U etc.

    cacio
    It certainly seems that H is the defining y-haplogroup among the Romani (gypsy) people.

    I would like to know more about the Y-hg I found among them, as well. Is it the undifferentiated I of the Middle East and the Caucasus, the East Euro I1b of the Balkans, or some other variety of I? I didn't get that info from skimming those articles.

    It does seem that there is much less R among the Romani than in the Indian population in general.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Honeychuck
    replied
    Gypsy DNA

    Last Friday DNA Tribes posted a sample autosomal genetic profile:



    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    Sorry Victor, I didn't see your post before I submitted.

    Looking at the data, one would think that the Indian component is essentially only H. The other major Indian groups (R1a, R2, L) seem small or absent,
    and this even more after accounting for the fact that Eastern Europe has a lot of R1as. J's are present in India but could have been picked up in the Middle East.

    What puzzles me is Haplogroup I. Haplogroup I is very non Indian. Could it be sign of an admixture in the Balkans? I is found also (5/20) in their smaller Spanish Roma sample.

    I didn't write down the mtdna data. Lots of M's (Indian), but also many H, U etc.

    cacio

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    Two articles I know of are the following:

    Gresham et al: Origin and divergence of the Roma
    Kalaydjieva et al: Patterns of inter- and intra-group genetic diversity in the Vlax Roma

    Gresham (with a sample mostly from Bulgaria) finds the following for the Y chromosome (but this has to be verified, they use a non-standard notation that I tried to map):
    H1 44%
    I 22.6%
    J2f 12.6%
    R1 6.7%
    FxI,J,H1,R 3.6%
    E3b 3.6%

    Kalaydjieva (even more difficult to read) finds 73% H in her Vlax sample,
    with the second largest being (I believe) FxJHK.

    cacio

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    Just a couple of additional references not listed in ISOGG's page

    Origins and Divergence of the Roma (Gypsies)


    Patterns of inter- and intra-group genetic diversity in
    the Vlax Roma as revealed by Y chromosome and
    mitochondrial DNA lineages


    There are a couple of other studies related to the Romani but I just couldn't find the full text versions.

    The haplogroup that I've also seen associated with the Roma people, besides H, is R1a. Check some of the tables at the following link.



    Victor

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Here is an interesting site with photos of modern gypsies in England.

    At the bottom right you can click on a link to photos of gypsies in other parts of Europe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    started a topic Gypsy DNA

    Gypsy DNA

    What do we know about the Gypsy or Roma people and their DNA?

    A little can be found on the ISOGG site here.

    It mentions y-haplogroup H:

    Originally posted by http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpH.html
    Y-DNA haplogroup H: The founding mutation for haplogroup H, M69, occurred in a haplogroup F man, probably in the Indian subcontinent The founder of haplogroup H probably lived about 30,000-40,000 years ago. This haplogroup has not yet been studied in a comprehensive manner. Today, nearly all members of haplogroup H live in the Indian subcontinent area. The Roma (also known as Gypsy) people, who apparently originated in India, are the main source of haplogroup H in western Europe.
    In googling "Gypsy DNA" I also saw mention of y-haplogroup R2.

    Anyone know any more about this subject?
Working...
X