Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Celts were haplogroup I?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Victor
    On the contrary! With your background you're better prepared to assimilate all this information and then share with us some of your insights.
    I've started reading some of the Celtiberian stuff. It looks pretty well researched and documented. I like the references to primary source material.

    I like the fact that the site is oriented toward history and archaeology.

    Some folks try to abandon those disciplines in favor of reading the genetic tea leaves.

    Can't be done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo
    Awesome site, Victor!

    I love it!

    Plenty of reading material.

    Are you trying to keep me too busy to post here?

    On the contrary! With your background you're better prepared to assimilate all this information and then share with us some of your insights.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Victor
    Most surely the e-Keltoi journal hasn't escaped your attention. A good source of information on Celtic culture, particulary the Celtiberians.



    Here's a quote from one of the essays that I find very revealing:
    Awesome site, Victor!

    I love it!

    Plenty of reading material.

    Are you trying to keep me too busy to post here?

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    Most surely the e-Keltoi journal hasn't escaped your attention. A good source of information on Celtic culture, particulary the Celtiberians.



    Here's a quote from one of the essays that I find very revealing:
    Regardless of the relations and influences (whether these are close or remote) that can be traced as part of the study of the different aspects that make up a society, the Celtiberians never constituted an identifiable social, cultural, or political unit. Hence, the study of this group must be geared toward an analysis of the historical process that developed throughout an amalgamation of populations that inhabited a territory defined by Classical writers as "Celtiberia".
    Last edited by Victor; 16 June 2006, 08:37 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by lgmayka
    On the Genographic Project, Spencer Wells gives a short video summary of each haplogroup. (This might only be visible to those who have actually joined the project--e.g., by paying $15 to transfer DNA information from FTDNA to the project.)

    Wells considers it "possible" that the Celts were haplogroup I and spread it throughout central and western Europe. Surely he can't be referring to I1b, which is mostly Slavic, nor I1a, which is mostly Scandinavian. Perhaps he is referring only to I1c?
    The site's Atlas of the Human Journey used to say that about Y-Haplogroup I but no longer does. Now it says something equally silly about the Vikings, as if such groups from relatively recent recorded history were genetically homogeneous.

    I chalk such things up to marketing. What better way to get someone to purchase a kit than to make him think he might find out his ancestors were Vikings?

    There is not enough I in the formerly Celtic regions of Europe to make the Celts primarily members of that y-haplogroup.

    Some have said the Celts were all R1b, but I don't buy that either. Many R1bs were Celts, many others were not. Some or many Is were Celts, many more probably were not.

    Celt is an ethno-linguistic term, not a genetic one.

    The attempts to make all Slavs R1a and all Teutons I1a are equally misguided.
    Last edited by Stevo; 16 June 2006, 07:50 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • lgmayka
    started a topic Celts were haplogroup I?

    Celts were haplogroup I?

    On the Genographic Project, Spencer Wells gives a short video summary of each haplogroup. (This might only be visible to those who have actually joined the project--e.g., by paying $15 to transfer DNA information from FTDNA to the project.)

    Wells considers it "possible" that the Celts were haplogroup I and spread it throughout central and western Europe. Surely he can't be referring to I1b, which is mostly Slavic, nor I1a, which is mostly Scandinavian. Perhaps he is referring only to I1c?
Working...
X