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Celts were haplogroup I?

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  • Clochaire
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Denning
    'Celts were haplogroup I?'


    some were most weren't the keltoi came from 10 main tribes and were matricidal for membership. they assimilated other smaller tribes introducing assorted ydna
    This makes sense--most serious historians consider Celtic identity to be primarily linguistic or cultural.

    But did you mean matriarchal rather than matricidal?

    To my knowledge, matriarchy among the Celts was limited to Picts--although prominence of goddess cults and several instances of celebrated individual Celtic women (e.g. Buodicca, Grainne Mhaol) suggests that Celts accorded a greater degree of equality
    than their Mediterrenean or Germanic counterparts.


    Jack

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  • Deirwha
    replied
    freaking weird, isn't it.

    mail me at [email protected] and I will get them on here.

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  • Wena
    Guest replied
    Why are the content of my posts refused?

    What is going on?
    Last edited by Guest; 13 August 2008, 05:30 PM.

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  • Jim Denning
    replied
    'Celts were haplogroup I?'

    'Celts were haplogroup I?'


    some were most weren't the keltoi came from 10 main tribes and were matricidal for membership. they assimilated other smaller tribes introducing assorted ydna

    Leave a comment:


  • Wena
    Guest replied
    or there is some kind of error?

    The Norway

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  • Wena
    Guest replied
    Well it seems like I am not allowed to post here

    The Norway

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  • Deirwha
    replied
    The Norway

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  • Hansen
    Guest replied
    etc. continuing post from Wena

    The Norway

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  • Wena
    Guest replied
    The Norway

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  • Wena
    Guest replied

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  • Wena
    Guest replied
    not allowed to post the rest now

    continues later abt I1a and Celts
    Last edited by Guest; 13 August 2008, 01:11 PM. Reason: space

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  • Wena
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by ravna
    Rosser et al, 2000, Am J Hum Gen 67; 1526-1543, shows in Table 1 that Hg2 (Eu18-I) is found in 32% of Icelandic population and in 31% of the Saami population. I don't think thare are much Hg N among the Norwegian coast Saami population (Dupuy et al, 2006). I have read that Saami seamen were part of the expeditions of the so-called Viking. It is important to realize thet the Viking myths are of newer date. They were conciously used in the nation-building of the new nation Norway from 1814 (Constitution, separation from Denmark and joining Sweden) and from 1905 when we finally became independent.

    That is unfair Stevo to throw people from the discussion because it is about the Saami and then continue to comment on Norwegian haplogroups (that not even are hg I) in the next posts.

    This is a comment on the posts of Ravna, Native and Noaide.

    The Saami have a high frequency of I1a, and the Skolt Saami have over 50 % of I1a. Can it be that hg I1a is related to Celts when it is so prevalent in the Nordic countries? I do not have enough information to answer that.

    To Native:
    The origin of haplogroup N is not Saami. And do not throw your own extremist attitudes at others. I agree with Noaide that your knowledge is very limited about Saami culture. You to read and learn more instead of following your prejudices.

    Haplogroup N are not as frequent in the Norwegian Saami areas, because the men of the Kven people (coming from Russian areas) that brought this haplogroup to the Nordic areas immigrated here very late in history.

    The Kvens are not Saami, they their own language and culture that is related to Finland and Russia. In some areas of Finland the frequency of N is extreme (e.g. eastern Finland) these men are not Saami and have never been. The Kvens immigrated to some Norwegian areas from 1500-1900, mostly between 1700-1850.

    continues...

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  • Jambalaia32
    replied
    Celts I

    The first few pages here has great coments! You say what I think









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  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by jaynegen
    Sorry Stevo, I got distracted for the past few weeks working on my Masters. Here's my dad's ysearch number. 79YQ2.

    I'll look into the U series test. What will that do?

    Thanks for all of your help!
    The U series will show whether your dad is R1b1c9 or 10.

    Since some of his closest matches at 37 markers have 67-marker haplotypes and 492=13, and that seems to be a good indicator of R1b1c9, your dad could be U106+ and thus R1b1c9.

    But there is no way to tell for sure without the test.

    R1b1c9 is the most common form of R1b1c in the traditionally Germanic lands.

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  • jaynegen
    replied
    ysearch R1b1c

    Originally posted by Stevo
    Check out the y-dna map of Europe on page 2 here.

    Your dad should order the U series test from FTDNA (it's only $39).

    Do you have a YSearch ID number for your dad's haplotype? I'd like to take a look, if you wouldn't mind.
    Sorry Stevo, I got distracted for the past few weeks working on my Masters. Here's my dad's ysearch number. 79YQ2.

    I'll look into the U series test. What will that do?

    Thanks for all of your help!

    Leave a comment:

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