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Saami H1

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  • johnraciti
    Guest replied
    Ibero-Finnic tribes found in a primitive Italian culture

    Ibero-Finnic tribes found in a primitive Italian culture

    EtruscansÂ… had Finnic connections.

    A team of geneticists from different universities in Italy and Spain undertook the first genetic studies of the ancient Etruscans, based on mitochondrial DNA from 80 bone samples taken from tombs dating from the seventh century to the third century BC in Etruria. This study finds that they were more related to each other than to the general population of modern Italy. Recent studies suggested a Near East origin (U5a1a).

    All the females in both sides of my Sicilian family are U5a1a members. We are from S.Stefano di Camastra ME Sicily, Italy.

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  • Noaide
    replied
    Saami have H 311

    Mari,

    Did a look at my little Saami mtdna database, though it was not there but when looking there is actually two cases of H 16311 in Saami in Finland and Sweden. It is not a typicial Saami mtDNA but it does occur among the Saami.

    Noaide

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  • mari
    replied
    Thank you guys

    You would not believe the chill I got in my bones while reading your replies.
    Sounds like a road trip for me the summer I remember the gates to the cemetary, but not the name, it was soooooo.... long ago. But now I have more ideas on where to look deeper.Thanks again.
    mari

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  • Noaide
    replied
    H 311C is seem to appear in Finland from one research paper I have.

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  • Eki
    replied
    Originally posted by Noaide
    Mari,

    My guess is that you belong to hg H11a.

    However I have not access to any big databases, only some small research papers. Have you checked FTDNA's "mtDNA Anchestral Origins database"? Do you get many hits in Finland or Scandinavia?

    Noaide
    Maybe not that many people from Finland and Scandinavia have tested their mtDNA. The "closest to home" match for me was one match from Norway, the others were from Germany, Ireland, Great Britain, Scotland, Wales, Poland, Switzerland and Hungary. Although 12 of my 20 matches were marked "Unknown Origin".

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  • Noaide
    replied
    H11a

    Mari,

    My guess is that you belong to hg H11a.

    However I have not access to any big databases, only some small research papers. Have you checked FTDNA's "mtDNA Anchestral Origins database"? Do you get many hits in Finland or Scandinavia?

    Noaide
    Last edited by Noaide; 3 May 2006, 03:43 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noaide
    replied
    Hi Mari,

    If they were refugees I would guess they may have come from Finnish Lappland. 1944 the Finns switched side and some of the Germans was forced to withdraw from Finland trough northern Norway. As revenge the Germans burned most of Finnish Lappland where most of the Saami in Finland live, so you could image much people would try to get away.

    Finnish names are easily recognizable. If you know the cemetary, you could look up some Finnish name so you get an idea of the style of their names and do research. Maybe the church the cementary belong too have a register to lookup.

    Noaide

    Originally posted by mari
    I have a question for you, since your knowlege is pretty sharp.
    I am trying to find my origins from my testing and oral information told to me as I was growing up. I dont know how to find a list of imigrants to the US in the late 1940s. If that truely was when my folks were supposed to have arrived from Finland. I know a sur-name is most important,.. well I am still trying to find that out as well. And the placement home I was adopted out of is taking their time..on answering me, Red tape I suppose. My adopted grandmother told me my parents were saami and fleeing the war. I have no idea how old they were, or if there were any other children. Grandma took me to a cemetary, but I dont remember the names on the stone.
    mari

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  • mari
    replied
    Noaide

    I have a question for you, since your knowlege is pretty sharp.
    I am trying to find my origins from my testing and oral information told to me as I was growing up. I dont know how to find a list of imigrants to the US in the late 1940s. If that truely was when my folks were supposed to have arrived from Finland. I know a sur-name is most important,.. well I am still trying to find that out as well. And the placement home I was adopted out of is taking their time..on answering me, Red tape I suppose. My adopted grandmother told me my parents were saami and fleeing the war. I have no idea how old they were, or if there were any other children. Grandma took me to a cemetary, but I dont remember the names on the stone.
    mari

    Leave a comment:


  • Noaide
    replied
    H1

    I got another test of an relative:

    HVR1: 162G, 519C

    This come from the same area as Deleghani 1998 observed mentioned earlier, however Deleghani did not test in the same range as FTDNA. So I suspect it to be the same as one of the profiles of H1 seen in Deleghani 1998.

    98 hits at HVR1 in FTDNA's database spread all over Europe, impossible to put it in some specific etnic population or geographical location except the broader European continent.
    Last edited by Noaide; 30 March 2006, 07:27 AM.

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  • Noaide
    replied
    Ok, so the reason why I dont see it in mitosearch is because of coincidence and because of scewness in the sampling (more western europeans test than east europeans). Is H 162 seen at low frequency in Europe?

    Interesting that the 162-233 type is only seem among the Saami.

    Originally posted by vraatyah
    H 162 doesn't seem rare, it's found everywhere in Europe, particularly in the East - in the Russians, Finns, Balcanians, even in the Caucasus. As to 162-233 type, I saw the only one example in the paper by Delghandi, indeed.

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  • vraatyah
    replied
    H 162 doesn't seem rare, it's found everywhere in Europe, particularly in the East - in the Russians, Finns, Balcanians, even in the Caucasus. As to 162-233 type, I saw the only one example in the paper by Delghandi, indeed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noaide
    started a topic Saami H1

    Saami H1

    I have tried to make mitosearch searches on the most frequent Saami H1 haplotypes, but no matches. Is these haplotypes seen anywhere else on some more complete databases?

    The haplotypes are:

    1. HVR1: 162 HVR2: 073, 152, 263 (n=2)
    2. HVR1: 162, 233 HVR2: 073, 152, 263, 363 (n=1)
    3. HVR1. 162 HVR2: 073, 263 (n=1)

    http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB...rtikelNr=22789
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