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O'Conor Kings of Connaught

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    M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    Thanks.

    There sure were a lot names in the first link. Shouldn't they all have the same sequnce?

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
    Guest

  • lemmy
    Guest replied
    Milesian Genealogies.

    This site may interest you:


    http://www.rootsweb.com/~fianna/history/milesian.html


    Fergus, King of Dalriada.

    http://www.dalriada-restaurant.com/webpages/history.htm
    Guest
    Guest
    Last edited by Guest; 5 July 2006, 05:43 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    That is an interesting tribe.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    I'm curious which value you have for ...DYS393= ?

    I had to look up the Dalriada for a general idea. You never know..*POOF* I could be one too
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalriada

    I am aware different sites will have varying views on who they were.

    How have you come to your conclusion?

    (Is Martin a common surname in Kilmartin? or the general area. )

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
    Guest

  • Tyy
    Guest replied
    Dalriada

    I'm a descendant of the Dalriada and I'm wondering how much archaeology is being done in Scone and the other seat of the Pictish kings, since there is relatively little to go on in written history.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    I may look some of his stuff up. I visit the library every other week or so. I'm sure the librarian can get the book, even if it is in another library branch.

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by M.O'Connor
    I never was much of a book reader. I did like the pictures.

    When you were reading Conan in class I was probably playing hookey
    You should read some of Howard's stuff now. Based on what you seem to be interested in here, I think you would like it.

    You can pick one up at the library, so it shouldn't cost you anything.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    I never was much of a book reader. I did like the pictures.

    When you were reading Conan in class I was probably playing hookey

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by M.O'Connor
    I was reading a bit of this in reference to Bran Mak Morn.
    http://www.rehupa.com/marek_omb38.htm


    I looked up this guy too

    Bede

    http://ireland.celtic-twilight.com/a...bede/index.htm
    I enjoyed perusing that Robert E. Howard fan web site. Howard's Picts were fictional and based on the old 19th century idea that Europe was peopled by a small, swarthy race of "Mediterraneans" before the coming of the Indo-European tribes from the East. Howard's fictional Picts represented those pre-IE folks.

    Still, I love Robert E. Howard's fiction. In high school I sat in the back of math class with a Conan novel stuck in my Geometry book practically every day.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    I was reading a bit of this in reference to Bran Mak Morn.
    http://www.rehupa.com/marek_omb38.htm


    I looked up this guy too

    Bede

    http://ireland.celtic-twilight.com/a...bede/index.htm

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Have you ever read Bran Mak Morn by Robert E. Howard? It is a volume of short stories in which the Picts are featured, along with their fictional King Bran.

    I've read it several times, but the last time was quite a few years ago. Great book, though, if you like sword-and-sorcery adventure stories.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    This is a few paragraphs on language from http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/picts/language.htm (near bottom )

    "However, as the Picts themselves kept no written records of their lifestyles, beliefs or heritage, their language has now all but disappeared. The only sources that can give vague clues as to its nature are some of the carved inscriptions they left, placenames and certain accounts of Pictish names written by external sources at the time.

    As with all things Pictish, however, the lack of concrete evidence has led to a number of opinions and theories as to the form of the spoken language of the inhabitants of Northern Scotland in the early centuries of the first millennium.

    These generally fall into one of three camps:

    The Picts spoke an ancient language indigenous to area - a language that predated the Celtic languages of the Britons, the Scots and the Irish. This language did not have an Indo-European origin but was instead a survival of the ancient language used by the Bronze Age people of the area.


    The Picts spoke a P-Celtic language - that is a Celtic language related to the language of the Ancient Britons. When the Celts arrived in Britain they brought with them an Indo-European language which replaced the existing languages of country. This, say supporters, is clear from the known Pictish placenames in north-east Scotland.

    But if this was the case why did Bede regard Pictish as a different language? Was there perhaps a strong regional accent? Just as a visitor to Orkney in past years often struggled with the Orcadian accent, although the islanders were still essentially speaking English.


    Along the same lines is the idea that the Picts spoke a P-Celtic language, a version of Ancient British that contained elements of Irish Gaelic - fragments picked up over the years through contact with the Scotti - the invading Irish settlers who claimed territory down the west coast of Scotland. This theory is strengthened by the fact that the writing system known to be used by the Picts – Ogham – actually originated in Ireland"

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    From what I know of the Picts, they are (or were) considered a Celtic people.
    I think they were pretty much driven into the Highlands of Scotland by the Scots from Northern Ireland and the Anglo-Saxons.

    I seem to remember reading more about them, but I've forgotten most of it, I guess.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    So...who were the Cruthneans ?

    Were they simply the Irish Scots of today ?


    I always liked history, but i never did finish highschool. So i consider myself a continuing student of learning. There are a lot of opinions and personal conclusions. I like to read them all and weigh things myself. There doesn't seem to be much concrete knowledge on the Pict People.

    I enjoyed this page
    http://members.aol.com/scothist/scot3.html
    M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer
    Last edited by M.O'Connor; 7 May 2006, 08:09 AM.

    Leave a comment:

  • M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer

  • M.O'Connor
    replied
    I'd say the Picts were an interesting group.

    I read some of this stuff...... http://members.tripod.com/~Halfmoon/
    M.O'Connor
    FTDNA Customer
    Last edited by M.O'Connor; 1 May 2006, 03:35 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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