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Underwater Archaeology

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  • Underwater Archaeology

    I'm starting this as an offshoot of the Indo-European discussion, which can be found here:
    http://www.familytreedna.com/forum/s...80&postcount=1

    The subject of archaeology is obviously relevant to the understanding and appreciation of the Genographic project's results.

    I found this very good discussion of underwater archaeology around Britain. If you donwload a couple of the PDFs and look at the maps and diagrams, you will understand why this is important.

    http://www.offshore-sea.org.uk/site/...?categoryID=37

    There are a few concepts to be aware of. The oceans were lower during glacial maxima. The weight of glaciers pushes down on the land causing the Earth's surface to be indented under and near the ice sheets. There is a counter-effect causing the land around the indented region to bulge upward. This can impact both the land area not covered by ocean, and the direction of runoff. This process is described under the heading of isostasy. Places such as Britain are impacted even in modern times by the isostaic rebound occurring as a result of the waning of the LGM.
    Last edited by Hetware; 13th January 2006, 12:59 PM.

  • #2
    Here is a link to some predicted haplo movements.. I liked the colour pictorials below. A little brighter than your average chart.
    (I always liked cartoons)
    (Though maybe not entirely accepted by all.) http://www.dnaheritage.com/masterclass2.asp

    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

    As for Archaeology.. (of our Genetic Ancestors)

    Things are getting wet.. http://www.iwcp.co.uk/ViewArticle2.a...icleID=1310963

    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

    Miami bones

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/s...543468,00.html

    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

    And the Crime of the Century.....

    http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...13/wtara13.xml
    Last edited by M.O'Connor; 14th January 2006, 05:11 AM.

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