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  • cacio
    replied
    wazirzada (and other Pakistani L):

    I just noticed that 4 more Pakistani haplogroup L people have appeared on ysearch. They seem all L3. Slowly, a decent comparison group seems to appear also for that country.

    cacio

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  • cacio
    replied
    Again about Y-chromosome haplogroup L, I have recently received a result for a deep clade test. If it is correct (I have no clue on the reliability of this test), I am L2b (=M317 and M349). Reading Sengupta's paper on India, L2 doesn't seem to appear there, and there are only a couple in Pakistan. Some have been found in papers on Iran and Turkey. So may be L2 is a western spinoff of haplogroup L. Who knows, there isn't much L being tested...

    cacio

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  • cacio
    replied
    Adiarun21:

    I looked at the article. Unfortunately, it uses a different nomenclature.
    Names have been standardized only recently, so papers of a few years ago all use different lettering systems.

    It seems that what this paper calls L is actually O3 (or some other O's), which means standard Chinese. Our haplogroup L would be part of what the paper calls 'F', of which there seems to be a fair number in Melanesia. However, this 'F' groups contains both K and L, and my guess is that most people there are K.

    As far as I know, hap L is found in the subcontinents at good frequencies (15-20), and then from there West towards Iran, Anatolia and the Mediterranean, although at much smaller frequencies.

    Are you L yourself? if so, you should join the L-haplogroup project.

    cacio

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  • adiarun21
    Guest replied
    Thanks for the info Cacio. Your website is very informative.
    how about this paper?. This means there are some polynesians with the same marker?
    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1235276

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  • cacio
    replied
    In addition to the matches shown by lgmayka, these STRs have matches in a paper by Sengupta et al on India and Pakistan (they do not test 385, though). Guy 2 has several matches there, so it seems a very common haplotype. Guy 1 has one match. But as said, it is very close to guy 2, so they probably both belong to the same subgroup. Sengupta classifies the matches to both guys under haplogroup L1. Essentially, almost all Indian people belonging to hap L belong to L1. In Pakistan, they are divided btw L1 and L3, with a few L2.

    cacio

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  • lgmayka
    replied
    Originally posted by adiarun21
    393 390 19 391 385a 385b 426 388 439 389-1 392 389-2
    Guy 1 - 11 23 14 10 15 17 11 12 12 12 14 28
    Guy 2 - 11 22 14 10 14 17 11 12 12 12 14 16
    The first one has an exact match in Pakistan, haplogroup L:
    http://www.ysearch.org/search_view.asp?viewuid=KFMDV

    The second one is only 2 (genetic distance) from the first, once you realize that the value of 16 for 389-2 must be added to the 12 for 389-1 (thus yielding 28) when comparing against the Ysearch database. It has two 1-off matches in India:

    http://www.ysearch.org/search_view.asp?viewuid=TP39C

    http://www.ysearch.org/search_view.asp?viewuid=BYV2K
    Last edited by lgmayka; 25 May 2006, 08:17 PM.

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  • adiarun21
    Guest replied
    Can you guys point me to a doc that can help me interpret these

    393 390 19 391 385a 385b 426 388 439 389-1 392 389-2
    Guy 1 - 11 23 14 10 15 17 11 12 12 12 14 28
    Guy 2 - 11 22 14 10 14 17 11 12 12 12 14 16

    Thanks in advance
    -A

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    Again about haplogroup L: Wazirzada,
    I have noticed a couple more people that match you on ysearch/the L-haplogroup project (i.e. Treen, Walayat). More descendants of your very prolific ancestor?

    cacio

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  • anjumkha
    Guest replied
    Thanks I was able to upload to Ysearch.

    MK

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  • lgmayka
    replied
    Originally posted by anjumkha
    I have been unable to upload data from FtreeDna to Ysearch Gedcom.
    The Gedcom format is for entire family trees, not for an individual's DNA data.

    Log into your FTDNA Web page. Click on the tab for Y-DNA Matches. I think the resulting page will provide an icon for uploading your DNA data into the Ysearch database. When you do this, and create a (free) account on Ysearch, you can then search the database for other DNA similar to yours.

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    You mean you've created your genealogical tree and want to upload it?

    I don't know Genpro- I have used Personal Ancestry File (PAF, I believe it's free from the sorenson foundation) to create my gedcom. Anyway, since gedcom files are standard, it may be somewhere - I would check in the file menu under SAVE (and check if there is an option "save as gedcom") or under EXPORT (again, check if there is a "GEDCOM" choice).

    You can upload to ysearch your STR values (if I remember correctly, this may be done automatically from your ftdna webpage), so you can search and compare yourself to other ysearch members. Then, later on, you can upload your family tree.
    cacio

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  • anjumkha
    Guest replied
    Dear Cacio:
    Yes you are right I am from NW India.

    I have been unable to upload data from FtreeDna to Ysearch Gedcom. Yesterday I bought Genpro, but no luck. How do I make a file on my computer with a gedcom extension?

    Kind regards

    M Khan

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    dear anjumkha,

    if you like to read scholarly articles, you can check the following paper by Sengupta et al., which talks extensively about R1a in India:
    http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publication...8_p202-221.pdf

    They claim that most Indian Y chromosomes have arrived in the subcontinent very early (ie more than 10K years ago), including many of the R1a's. R1a people are very common in India, the paper shows data between 15 and 30% of the population, and above all in the Northwest (where I presume you come from). Of course, I am not a scientist, so I cannot evaluate the claim of the paper - but anyway, at least the paper provides lots of data. The accepted wisdom instead, as igmayka said, is that R1a is a marker of the (relatively more recent) Aryan invasion.

    The data from the paper is posted online:
    http://www.dnaheritage.com/rootsweb/
    so if you have time, you can download the excel file and check whether the STR numbers you have match some of sengupta's data. (These data are not on ysearch, which I presume does not contain too many Indians).

    (Incidentally, you should also do an mtdna test (ie, female line). Indian mtdna is very diverse and contains many ancient lineages that have not been studied so far.)

    cacio

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  • anjumkha
    Guest replied
    Newbie needs hand holding

    Dear Igmayka:
    Thanks for your reply. I am begening to understand a little, but I can assure you it is so fascinating.

    If you have time, would you be able to help me a bit more. Can I provide my familytreedna Kit # and PW to you on this forum so that you can explain more what the data means.

    Sincerely,
    M Khan

    Leave a comment:


  • lgmayka
    replied
    Here is more about R1a:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_R1a_(YDNA)

    It reaches its highest relative concentration in Poland and Russia, countries in which over 50% of the population have R1a.

    Leave a comment:

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