Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help in understanding my results

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help in understanding my results

    My haplogroup is L(M20). How can I know what other racial groups can be probable bearers of the same haplogroup.Thnx

  • #2
    No response in more than a week?

    Originally posted by sadozai
    My haplogroup is L(M20). How can I know what other racial groups can be probable bearers of the same haplogroup.Thnx
    I posted the above message more than a week ago, but hv not heard anyone comment?

    Comment


    • #3
      Help in understanding my results

      Originally posted by sadozai
      My haplogroup is L(M20). How can I know what other racial groups can be probable bearers of the same haplogroup.Thnx
      Haplogroup L is considered to be an Indian marker. It's frequency is highest in South India. However, as the case with all other major Haplogroups of India, R and H, it could have been originated anywhere in Near East or Central Asia or in Indian sub-continent itself(stretching from Hindu Kush mountains to Sri Lanka).

      Comment


      • #4
        Haplogroup L

        Thank you very much FatherR.
        Does the (M20) help in narrowing the field somewhat?

        Regds

        Yusuf

        Comment


        • #5
          Does the (M20) help in narrowing the field somewhat?
          I suppose that is the defining mutation for L*. If you belong to Indian sub-continent you can be L1 too(M27 or M76) a dominant subgroup among Indians.

          Comment


          • #6
            How can I find my more recent origins?

            Originally posted by fatherR
            I suppose that is the defining mutation for L*. If you belong to Indian sub-continent you can be L1 too(M27 or M76) a dominant subgroup among Indians.

            So the L (M20) is such a broad category that it is almost not helpful. Is there any way I can narrow the field .

            I am ethnically an Afghan (from Southern Afghanistan i.e. Kandahar). The Afghan oral history claims semitic/hebrew descent (one of the lost tribes of Israel), while other historians have hypothesised central asian (hepthalite i.e. white huns), Indian (i.e. rajput) as well as greek origins, amongst others.

            I dont know if the Afghans are a homogenous group in terms of their haplogroup or if there is a dominant haplogroup among them...is that info available somewhere. Also my haplogroup could be an outlier, as my paternal line may have migrated from elsewhere and lived amongst the Afghans for a long time. How can I learn more.

            Would appreciate help

            Yusuf

            Comment


            • #7
              Here is a mtDNA analysis of Afghans and neighbouring peoples.

              http://www.oxfordancestors.com/paper...ALandscape.pdf

              Here is a Y-chromosomal analysis of Pakistan, they use another designation systems here, but it seem to be "hg 28" that is equivilant to L.

              http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...i?artid=447589

              A haplotype table you may compare your STR numbers with is here: http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...e=table&id=TB9

              Translation sheet is here:

              http://ycc.biosci.arizona.edu/nomenc...stem/fig1.html

              Comment


              • #8
                http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publication...v98_p10244.pdf

                In this table you will find some Y-DNA percentages for central asia. M20 does not seem so common amon the countries mentioned here.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Help in understanding my results

                  Thank you very much for your prompt and detailed repsonse.
                  Let me absorb all of this and I may come back with some questions.

                  Thnx!!!
                  Yusuf

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Help in understanding my results

                    Thank you very much Noaide,

                    Appreciate the prompt and detailed reposnse. Let me absorb all of this and I may come back with some questions.

                    Thnx!!!

                    Yusuf

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dear Sadozai,

                      I am Italian and I also happen to belong to haplogroup L.
                      Since that is strange, I have looked for information on haplogroup L
                      and collected links to various articles that talk about it. These
                      are linked on my webpage:
                      http://www.people.virginia.edu/~mc6s.../genetics.html

                      They are mostly academic papers and difficult to read, but usually
                      they give percentages in various populations.

                      In brief, as others have said before, haplogroup L is typical of
                      the Indian subcontinent (around 15% or so of the population), but is
                      found at smaller percentages in Iran, Turkey, the Caucasus
                      region, and central asia (around 3%), as well as (at lower percentages)
                      Italy and Spain.
                      In the articles I have seen, Afghanistan is never studied (for obvious
                      reasons), but often studies about Pakistan include a sample of
                      what they call Pathans, which I assume are Pashtun living in the
                      NW territories. If they have a genetic makeup similar to the Pashtun
                      of Afghanistan, then some papers show the data. If I remember correctly,
                      the Pathans seem somewhat similar in distribution to most
                      other Pakistani groups, which means again a 20% or so of haplogroup L.

                      This posting is becoming too long. Another time we can discuss more
                      about it, the origin of haplogroup L, etc.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Help in the understanding of my Results

                        This Forum has been a big help in the understanding of my results.

                        I have been able to deduce that L(M20) which same as Hg28 forms between 13 tp 15% of the population of India on the basis of the DNA samples collected so far.

                        Suprisingly, there is a simimar frequency of this marker in Pakistan. Which means this marker is fairly evenly distributed in the sub continent.

                        L(M20) is found to be 15% to 17% in the samples taken from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan which most likey is closer to the source of this marker.

                        17% of the Parsis; followers of Zoarestor religion(an ancient religion which origated in Iran) have aloso been found with this marker. Parsis came to India first in the 7th and then in the 9th century. They have mostly settled in South of India.

                        13% of the Pukhtuns (Phatans) in Pakistan seem to have this marker.

                        Therefore, to conclude L(M20) has been found across religions and across races in the subcontinent and some of the Central asian republics.

                        I read somewhere that different populations of L can mutate to M20 independently at different locations and in different time periods. Can any one confirm this.

                        If this is true, than L(M20) or for that purpose any marker cannot have a unique geographical source or unique time period of origin.

                        Regards,

                        Wazirzada

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not only haplogroups, also haplotypes

                          You should also not only compare your haplogroups but also haplotypes as well. Two populations may have the same haplogroup and even have the same frequency, but they may have different kind of dominating haplotypes in each population. The link I gave earlier include haplotype data for the popuations in Pakistan. If you match a certian dominating haplotype in a population that may put you even closer to certian populations than a simple haplogroup comparisment can do.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            dear wazirdada,

                            regarding possible subgroups of haplogroup L, I think there
                            is only one paper who has studied the issue:
                            Polarity and temporality of high resolution Y-chromosome distribution in India etc., by Sengupta et al. (forthcoming American Journal of Human Genetics).
                            (see my webpage at http://www.people.virginia.edu/~mc6s.../genetics.html)

                            The study finds three subgroups to haplogroup L. It calls them L1, L2
                            and L3. Interestingly, while only L1 is found in India, all three are found
                            in Pakistan, which may be taken as a small suggestion that haplogroup
                            L did not originate in India.

                            As for the percentages in central Asia, it seems that the estimates
                            vary wildly. More recent studies seem to suggest lower percentages
                            in Uzbekistan/Tajikistan (a few percentage points rather than 10 or so).

                            The data on the Pashto I think comes mostly from Pashto
                            groups in Pakistan, so it is still an open question whether
                            the Pashto living on the other side of the mountains carry
                            similar markers (although this seems quite likely).
                            Because of the strict patrilinear structure of pashto clans, I think
                            it would be a great study to find the genetic signature of each
                            tribe. but this hasn't been done yet.

                            cacio

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Help in understanding my results

                              Dear Cacio,

                              The available figures on the ethnic grouping of Afghanistan is: Pashtun 42%, Tajik 27%, Hazara 9%, Uzbek 9%, Aimak 4%, Turkmen 3%, Baloch 2%, other 4%. Some estimates put the Pashtun figures at around 50%.

                              It can be reliably assumed that the Pahtuns in Pakistan would have fairly similar genitic grouping as that of Pashtuns in Afghanistan, the reason for this being that the 'Durand line' (border drawn arbitarily by the British to demarcate British India from Afghanistan) has never stood as a barrier for the Pashtun tribes to go back and forth...in fact a very good intermingling of the tribes has persisted for over a 100 years of this border. Till very recently there was no visa or passport requirements; and even in recent times when authorities on both sides have tried to implement a documentary passage, the masses have invariably avoided this by using the innumerous mountain tracks available.

                              I agree with you that a study of the Pashtun geneaology will be very informative and interesting. Oral History seems to suggest a common ancestory originating about 1500 years back, with a small exception of tribes which do not share this ancestory but are known as Pashtuns because they either were earlier settlers of the land occupied by the Pashtuns or came in later to settle among the Pashtuns.

                              Wazirzada

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X