Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Geno 2.0 Rawdata

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Geno 2.0 Rawdata

    I can see from the numbers of SNPs NG advertises will be tested, my Geno 2.0 rawdata download includes both positive and negative autosomal, X and Y SNPs. Yet, only 39 mt SNPs are listed, so apparently only positive mt SNPs are shown.

    A call and email to NG did not result in anything helpful. Does anyone know of a resource I can check or contact about Geno 2.0 rawdata format?

    Also, while common SNP names are used for Y-DNA SNPs, the X and autosomal SNPs use scientific IDs, which seems to eliminate any easy analysis of my results.

    So far, I am disappointed that there is so much information available about other company's rawdata downloads, such as 23andme, but little to nothing for the larger Geno project.

  • #2
    If you transfer your Geno Y data to FTDNA, for free, FTDNA will assign you a subclade that may be different from that assigned by Geno. You might also consider adding it to an appropriate Y project at FTDNA.

    I also sent a copy to Adrianno Squecco's project and you could see where your Geno results place you on the ISOGG Y tree.

    We are all waiting on revisions to the Y tree that are expected to be driven by Geno results.

    I don't know if anyone is accepting Geno autosomal data for re-analysis. You might query Gedmatch, DNATribes, Interpretome, Promethease ... depending on what you want to know.

    Comment


    • #3
      Actually, as a programmer, I would like to do my own analysis but need to know more about the data format and availability of comparison files.

      I have successfully used the dodecad tool on my computer to re-analyze the autosome portion of my data, even though I don't completely understand dodecad's process. It creates a revised/re-formatted file of my autosome results which it then compares to what I assume is a file of standard autosome results.

      Dodecad divides the world up into slightly different population regions than Geno 2.0, but the percentages are in the same range as Geno. One of the things it does beyond Geno is report percentages below 2%, which is interesting.

      Getting back to my original question, I really would like to understand my rawdata results as best I can myself, without relying on Geno's overly simple reports seemingly designed for K-12.

      My rawdata is well worth $199. Geno 2.0's reports - not so much.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by moallen View Post
        ...

        Getting back to my original question, I really would like to understand my rawdata results as best I can myself, without relying on Geno's overly simple reports seemingly designed for K-12.

        My rawdata is well worth $199. Geno 2.0's reports - not so much.
        What are you looking for that Geno 2.0 is not telling you?

        Comment


        • #5
          The project is a privately-funded, not-for-profit collaboration between the National Geographic Society, IBM and the Waitt Family Foundation. Part of the proceeds from the sale of self-testing kits support the Genographic Project's ongoing DNA collection, but the majority are ploughed into a Legacy Fund to be spent on cultural preservation projects nominated by indigenous communities.

          Comment

          Working...
          X