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  • No Mutations

    OK,, does anyone else out there have no Mutations haplogroup H?
    Is no mutations common?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Shari
    OK,, does anyone else out there have no Mutations haplogroup H?
    Is no mutations common?
    No mutations just means that you have no differences to the CRS (Cambridge Reference Sequence). The Scientists, in order to categorize various lineages, needed to have one MtDNA sequence of mutations (the Cambridge Reference Sequence) from which they can compare all other MtDNA. This is done so they can categorize the different lineages. They compare everyone elses MtDNA to this particular sequence, and any differences to it is what is reported as your results. They happened to choose a sequence from Haplogroup H to represent the CRS. You just happened to be a maternal genetic cousin to the individual with the sequence they chose as the CRS.
    Last edited by bobr; 10 October 2005, 01:21 PM.

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    • #3
      You just happened to be a maternal genetic cousin to the individual with the sequence they chose as the CRS.

      That is so strange...... I mean what are the odds I would have such happen?
      I have tried to look up on line, more detailed info on the CRS, and any info on the one they used for the original mtDNA, but I am not having any luck.
      Yes, there are web pages out there, but they do not have the info I seek.
      Do you have any ideas on how to go about this?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Shari
        You just happened to be a maternal genetic cousin to the individual with the sequence they chose as the CRS.

        That is so strange...... I mean what are the odds I would have such happen?
        I have tried to look up on line, more detailed info on the CRS, and any info on the one they used for the original mtDNA, but I am not having any luck.
        Yes, there are web pages out there, but they do not have the info I seek.
        Do you have any ideas on how to go about this?
        Sorry, but I wouldn't know where to find the 'ethnicity' of the person they used whos sequence is the CRS. I do know that Haplogroup H is the most common MtDNA Haplogroup in Europe. If I was in your situation, I'd probably want to order an MtDNA refine test to get the HVR2 mutations (if you have not already done so). You may have differences on this Region, which can match you up with other individuals who are related to you closer in time.
        Last edited by bobr; 10 October 2005, 04:05 PM.

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        • #5
          Yes, I did order the Refine test a couple of days ago.
          Do you know how long it normally takes to get the test results back?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Shari
            Yes, I did order the Refine test a couple of days ago.
            Do you know how long it normally takes to get the test results back?
            Well, i ordered my MtDNA refine in May of 2005 and have not received it yet. They need to get another sample from me because they were not able to get a reading from vials A and B. So be prepared to possibly wait awhile....

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            • #7
              Oh Goodness.....
              It took a really long time to get the GeoGraphic results. So by the time this is all through, could take over a year.
              Ah well,, guess it could be worse.

              Makes me wonder if I should order that other test I want to do now, instead of waiting for the results of the Refined test??

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              • #8
                My understanding is that the CRS sample was taken from a woman in England; so I assume she was English, although she could be Welsh, Scottish, Irish, or any of the other ethnic groups present in the British Isles.

                The research was being done at Cambridge, so it made sense for them to use a local sample. I think the test was done in the early 1980s, but I could be wrong. Now, a couple of decades later, we know that H is the most common mtDNA haplogroup in western Europe, so statistically, the odds were great that the sample would be H.

                Timothy Peterman

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                • #9
                  Thank you for the information.
                  That at least is a start.
                  I do have quite of bit of Scottish in me.

                  My curiosity isn't so much that I am in the H group, it is that there is no mutations within that group.
                  Have yet to meet up with someone that also has no mutations.
                  Last edited by Shari; 11 October 2005, 09:06 AM.

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                  • #10
                    No Mutations

                    Originally posted by Shari
                    Thank you for the information.
                    That at least is a start.
                    I do have quite of bit of Scottish in me.

                    My curiosity isn't so much that I am in the H group, it is that there is no mutations within that group.
                    Have yet to meet up with someone that also has no mutations.
                    I am Haplogroup H and I too have no mutions.

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                    • #11
                      derinos

                      "Mutations" has a specific meaning implying subsequent genetic changes from an earlier form.

                      Some of us showing *differences* or *variations* from the CRS may represent earlier, not later, clades of origin than that represented by the Cambridge lady whose MtDNA was selected as a comparison "standard" These "differences" are not necessarily genetic mutations and in some cases may represent an earlier, more "standard" standard!
                      "Differences" might be seen as the more scientific term.

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                      • #12
                        Janet what is your family background?

                        On my Mom's side, they are Acadian French,, though I do know there is some Scot sprinkled in here and there. I don't know of any British blood at all....in that direct line. Have researched back to when most of them came from France.

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                        • #13
                          derinos,

                          Oh that makes it so much more simple!! <LOL>

                          Have you any idea how I can find out the Race of the person that they based the CRS on? I do not want to meet her or anything like that. Just want to know because that side of my family is Acadian French and it is quite well researched on that side.

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                          • #14
                            derinos

                            The CRS lady was English, which is not a "race" so much as a pragmatic cultural identity.
                            Genetically that cultural grouping has multiple origins, with a majority from Paleolithic and Neolithic population moves from the Near East over some twenty millenia, more recently of Celtic, Germanic and Nordic ethnicity.
                            As to your recent Acadian French ethnicity, the whole of Western Europe could yield Celto-Germanic personal matches, but because Norman *England* (1066 to about 1400) included a large part of western *France*, closer family links occurred; you and the CRS lady could be related that way also.
                            Does anybody know what Haplogroup the CRS lady owns? Is she MtDNA Paleolithic or Neolithic?

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                            • #15
                              derinos

                              I see that Timothy Peterman has posted earlier in this thread that "H" is the CRS lady's Haplotype. I hope Timothy will permit me to reroduce his recent post of a clear explanation of the Sykes "Daughters of Eve" method of describing the haplotypes:

                              The "Seven Daughters of Eve" as published by Bryan Sykes of Oxford Ancestors were:

                              Helena (H)
                              Velda (V)
                              Ursula (U)
                              Katrine (K)
                              Jasmine (J)
                              Tara (T)
                              Xenia (X)

                              It is estimated that 95% of all Europeans are descended from these, with trace amounts descended from others.

                              Helena and Velda share a recent common ancestor, called HV (not to be confused with HVR 1 and HVR 2, which stand for Hyper Variable Region).

                              Jasmine and Tara share a recent common ancestor called JT.

                              Katrine and Ursula are part of the U supergroup, that is mainly Middle Eastern. Ursula was the earliest "daughter" to enter Europe and probably entered in conjunction with y-DNA haplogroup I some 45,000 years ago. Together, they brought the Aurignacian culture into Europe, partially displacing the Mousterian culture of the Neanderthals.

                              HV, JT, and the U supergroup are daughters of R. There are several non-European daughters of R, called B and F, which are found in East Asia, Polynesia, and Native America.

                              So HV, JT, U, B, and F are daughters of R.

                              Going back further, R is a daughter of N. Actually R and her sisters, W (that's you), I, X, and A are daughters of N. That X is Xenia, one of the "Seven Daughters...", found in both Europe and North America, with traces in southern Siberia. "A" can be found among Native Americans, and in the Siberian peninsula that almost touches Alaska.

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