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  • I don't understand my results?

    My results have returned from the Genographic Project and it states that I belong to the Haplogroup E3B (M35). From what I gather, this group includes people from Southern and Eastern Africa and the Middle East. But, I am not of African or Middle Eastern decent. My father's side of the family emigrated from Germany in the early 1900's. My father's father and father's mother are both of German decent. My mother's father is of a family that emigrated from Scotland in the 1700's and my mother's mother is of Native American decent belonging to the Cherokee tribe.

    I don't know how to understand the results. My testing took an unusual amount of time to complete, I submitted my samples in early June but did not recieve results until this week (mid-October). I don't know of any way I could dispute the results, but I am concerned that there may have been a mix up at the lab.

  • #2
    mysterious results

    my test also took a very long time, and came up with results I don't quite understand, and my haplogroup--w--is more common in Kashmir than in Ireland, where my great-grandfather came from.

    Comment


    • #3
      What they are testing for is ancient DNA, not the ones the last few hundred years.

      For example, I am in Group H with no mutations at all. In the Video I was told I am group H via the way of R.

      So for my Ancient family, they started in Eastern Africa into the middle East, up through Russia, and down to Scotland and France. This happened about 15,000 years ago.
      Even though I do not have African in my current 200+ years, doesn't mean I do not have it wayyyy back when. 15,000 years ago, was a long time in the past.

      I do have a lot of Scottish and Acadian French in my family line. Along with Native american. Now if I wanted to find out about the Native American part I would need to do another test.
      For me, I found my ancestors going up through Russia and interesting twist. Would of never thought of that myself.

      So your DNA test results are more than likely correct.

      Comment


      • #4
        Answer to Joe Brell: I'm Joachim from Athens, Greece and I had my DNA-tested through the Genographic Project as well. I was also classified as an E3b type. My paternal ancestors were Greeks who migrated to Greece, around the turn of last century, from present-day Turkey.
        From the little web-searching that I did, it seems that E3b is a haplogroup found mainly around the Mediterranean. A particular sub-clade known as E3b 1-alpha is found in Southern Europe. This particular sub-clade is believed to have expanded out over the last 8000 years from an original population that settled in the Balkans, either during or before the Neolithic. In addition, it is estimated that 10% of all European men may be E3b.
        In a nutshell, we are talking about way back in time. Haplogroups existed well before nations, as we know them today, so the fact that you are associated with a haplogroup that is common to a specific geographic area does not mean that your paternal ancestry was from that ethnicity. Hope, I 've been helpful.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Joachim
          Answer to Joe Brell: I'm Joachim from Athens, Greece and I had my DNA-tested through the Genographic Project as well. I was also classified as an E3b type. My paternal ancestors were Greeks who migrated to Greece, around the turn of last century, from present-day Turkey.
          From the little web-searching that I did, it seems that E3b is a haplogroup found mainly around the Mediterranean. A particular sub-clade known as E3b 1-alpha is found in Southern Europe. This particular sub-clade is believed to have expanded out over the last 8000 years from an original population that settled in the Balkans, either during or before the Neolithic. In addition, it is estimated that 10% of all European men may be E3b.
          In a nutshell, we are talking about way back in time. Haplogroups existed well before nations, as we know them today, so the fact that you are associated with a haplogroup that is common to a specific geographic area does not mean that your paternal ancestry was from that ethnicity. Hope, I 've been helpful.
          Hi,

          Have you seen :

          http://www.greekdnaproject.net/

          Why don't you join the project ?

          Regards,
          CNT

          Comment


          • #6
            Also for Joe Brell: first of all, unless you have requested a SNP test, which is the only DEFINITIVE test for your haplogroup, the E3b is simply a statement that your test results (in this case, an STR haplotype test) are statistically most likely to fall into the E3b haplogroup. It is not definite, as the STR test is really meant to look at recent family relationships (i.e., if you match another Brell and have the same result, you are likely related; if you do not have the same result, you are not related). Using STRs to determine deep ancestry is incidental to this purpose and subject to inaccuracy. For example, my uncle's STR test matches him with people in haplogroups P and R. This was so odd that I have had a SNP test done, and they are still trying to figure it out--so far we have proved that he is *not* a P or an R. I myself have an STR type that has close matches in several different haplogroups. If you are really interested, pay the extra $65 and get the SNP test done.

            Second, if you are indeed E3b and from Germany, this does NOT mean that you are not of German descent. First, this is a test of your father's father's father's etc. most likely land of origin, going back thousands or tens of thousands of years. If you had a thousand people living in Roman times who were your ancestors, you now have a small piece of information about exactly one of them and know absolutely nothing about any of the other 999. This goes back to long before nations as they exist today were around. You could have a remote ancestor who was Jewish and converted, or you could have an ancestor who was a Roman legionnaire who settled in the border area of Germany, or you could even have an ancestor who was a trader from Greece or the Middle East in Neolithic times who ended up in Europe. Unless you have a paper trail or other non-DNA evidence there is absolutely no way to know this. But E3b in Europe is not all that shocking or surprising.

            Comment


            • #7
              Surprised to be E3b!

              Joe,

              You can also check the E3b project to get a overview of this haplogroup's geographical distribution and the diversity of participants.

              http://www.familytreedna.com/public/freemanDNAProject/

              Victor

              Comment


              • #8
                native american wild card

                People with Native American ancestry might want to keep in mind that the blood of African slaves is widely intermingled with Native Americans in the United States and Central America, among other places. During slavery and Jim Crow, many people sought classification as Native American, rather than black, if they were of mixed blood, because of the civil rights implications.
                So if an African haplogroup turns up myteriously in a lineage that includes Native American, that may help some of you family geneologists figure it out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Joe Brell
                  My results have returned from the Genographic Project and it states that I belong to the Haplogroup E3B (M35). From what I gather, this group includes people from Southern and Eastern Africa and the Middle East. But, I am not of African or Middle Eastern decent. My father's side of the family emigrated from Germany in the early 1900's. My father's father and father's mother are both of German decent. My mother's father is of a family that emigrated from Scotland in the 1700's and my mother's mother is of Native American decent belonging to the Cherokee tribe.

                  I don't know how to understand the results. My testing took an unusual amount of time to complete, I submitted my samples in early June but did not recieve results until this week (mid-October). I don't know of any way I could dispute the results, but I am concerned that there may have been a mix up at the lab.
                  welcome to the club
                  jim denning e3b1 from longford ireland

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by anne marie
                    People with Native American ancestry might want to keep in mind that the blood of African slaves is widely intermingled with Native Americans in the United States and Central America, among other places. During slavery and Jim Crow, many people sought classification as Native American, rather than black, if they were of mixed blood, because of the civil rights implications.
                    So if an African haplogroup turns up myteriously in a lineage that includes Native American, that may help some of you family geneologists figure it out.

                    since the story of the alaskan migration has and is being debunked. that leaves open who the people who traveled along the north atlantic ice pack were.were they soluteuans [sp?] what haplogroup would they have been e3b j k.

                    i once asked genealogy-dna before i left. if it was possible one invading force was all one haplogroup. they said definatly no. so all the above would of been there and more. e3bs


                    now that said there where people in the earth who had sea going ships at the time of ceaser. old julius said the old celtic ships where much bigger then his.he only beat them by throwing hooks up and over their sides and as the ships moved the sharpened hooks to razor edge cut their riggings.

                    the same olgham in england and scotland was found in mass by cotton mather
                    there is a monument in basque spain 2500+ years old translated only by the creek indian alphabet.

                    pheonicians did alot of stuff we dont think they did today


                    so if you find something that doesnt fit put it back in the box we dont want to see it
                    a couple of years ago a skeleton was found in the midwest somewhere the scientists said was real old and definatly caucasian.the indians stopped research and demanded it be put back much to the dismay of the scientists.
                    if the scientists were right was he e3b?, J ,I ,or r1
                    MIGHT BE NICE TO KNOW

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jim Denning
                      since the story of the alaskan migration has and is being debunked. that leaves open who the people who traveled along the north atlantic ice pack were.were they soluteuans [sp?] what haplogroup would they have been e3b j k.

                      so if you find something that doesnt fit put it back in the box we dont want to see it
                      a couple of years ago a skeleton was found in the midwest somewhere the scientists said was real old and definatly caucasian.the indians stopped research and demanded it be put back much to the dismay of the scientists.
                      if the scientists were right was he e3b?, J ,I ,or r1
                      MIGHT BE NICE TO KNOW
                      dude no offense but your so full of it :P why not do research before posting your hearts desire.

                      # Haplogroup Q is the lineage that links Asia and the Americas. This lineage is found in North and Central Asian populations as well as native Americans. This lineage is believed to have originated in Central Asia and migrated through the Altai/Baikal region of northern Eurasia into the Americas.

                      # Haplogroup Q3 is the only lineage strictly associated with native American populations. This haplogroup is defined by the presence of the M3 mutation (also known as SY103). This mutation occurred on the Q lineage 8-12 thousand years ago as the migration into the Americas was underway. There is some debate as to on which side of the Bering Strait this mutation occurred, but it definitely happened in the ancestors of the Native American peoples.

                      Also I think you were referring to the "Kennewick Man" The present results strongly suggested that Kennewick Man was an Ainu descended from the Chinese and Japanese. If you do a search for the Kennewick man and find his face reconstruction photos and compare it to Ainu peoples you'll see the same distinctiveness.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jim Denning
                        welcome to the club
                        jim denning e3b1 from longford ireland
                        Exactly what is y-E3b/1? Most haplogroups aren't specifically labeled one race or location,so I don't know what it is. Most European males are R1b,with the rest being R1a,or I.But on familyTreeDNA's hap.map I do see the male E hap. Mostly in Iberia,Spain and Italy,Turkey,and Russia,Persia(Iran)and Georgia-Armenia. Are E1b's Arabic or Negro? Lots of E's live in Italy,Spain,and Persia,and I never see any Black Africans in any of those places. And Jim Denning sure don't look Black ,nor Arab either.That good Irish weather has done a real good job on him!!!! Of Course no one knows what Jim is. He's a mystery Trucker. Anyways, maybe after years of living somewhere else,and mingling with others,you can take on a different appearance,and I not just speaking of Jim,but of anyone.But normally you look like you are.I think I look like a Germany(mtK) guy I've seen;turns out I was. Rarely do people live extermely far from home,so I guess most E dudes came from the Mediterranean,or Persia,while there are tiny amounts in Norway and Germany.

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