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  • Making sense of genographic results

    I received my mtDNA genographic results a couple of weeks ago, and was quite surprised as well as confused. I'm an African-American female, medium brown skin, dark brown eyes, moderately kinky hair, average nose. I don't look like a black African, but I can't pass for anything other than my obvious African-American self. My haplogroup is B which, if I interpreted my report correctly, arose in East Africa (around today's Egypt) and in Southeast and Central Asia, then migrated along Beringia through the Americas. This group is among the first to migrate into the Americas, composing the pre-Columbian Native American groups. OK, that makes my deep ancestry East African, Asian, and Native American. Obviously, the influence of more recent slavery entered into the picture and contributed to my looking as I do today. But how can such a recent (in the human timeline) infusion make me appear so predominately black. Of course, I've inherited by father's genetic line as well, but he has been mistaken for Hispanic as have his some of his siblings. We recently found out that it's possible that his real father was Jewish. I know I'm oversimplifying this, but how do you I reconcile my haplogroup B with who I am today? Note that I found two genetic matches on this site who are both Hawaiian. That was news! I'd appreciate some feedback from anyone who understands this and who has expertise about African-Americans in my haplogroup.

  • #2
    Originally posted by andalucia7
    I received my mtDNA genographic results a couple of weeks ago, and was quite surprised as well as confused. I'm an African-American female, medium brown skin, dark brown eyes, moderately kinky hair, average nose. I don't look like a black African, but I can't pass for anything other than my obvious African-American self. My haplogroup is B which, if I interpreted my report correctly, arose in East Africa (around today's Egypt) and in Southeast and Central Asia, then migrated along Beringia through the Americas. This group is among the first to migrate into the Americas, composing the pre-Columbian Native American groups. OK, that makes my deep ancestry East African, Asian, and Native American. Obviously, the influence of more recent slavery entered into the picture and contributed to my looking as I do today. But how can such a recent (in the human timeline) infusion make me appear so predominately black. Of course, I've inherited by father's genetic line as well, but he has been mistaken for Hispanic as have his some of his siblings. We recently found out that it's possible that his real father was Jewish. I know I'm oversimplifying this, but how do you I reconcile my haplogroup B with who I am today? Note that I found two genetic matches on this site who are both Hawaiian. That was news! I'd appreciate some feedback from anyone who understands this and who has expertise about African-Americans in my haplogroup.
    That's exactly what the haplogroups mean....deep ancestry. Your Haplogroup does not necessarily coincide with your phenotype. Your female line could have been originally Native American that married African American males in each generation, contributing to your current phenotype. Have you thought of a Native American connection? What is confusing though, is that you matched with Native Hawaiians. Maybe there's a polynesian connection somewhere or a connection with peoples who have both Asian and African heritage....maybe Malagasy?

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    • #3
      andalucia7,

      Remember that mtDNA reflects only your maternal line. Going back only 4 generations you have a maximum of 16 great great grandparents, all of whom contribute to your genetic makeup. Of these 16 people only one contributed to your mtDNA.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jim Barrett
        andalucia7,

        Remember that mtDNA reflects only your maternal line. Going back only 4 generations you have a maximum of 16 great great grandparents, all of whom contribute to your genetic makeup. Of these 16 people only one contributed to your mtDNA.
        Thanks to all!

        To Jim Barrett:
        It's an interesting coincidence that you're a Barrett from Texas. I am closely related to Barrett's in Anderson County, Texas (around Palestine) on my mother's side. She grew up in the Barrett Quarter, the original homestead of the white Barrett family, who owned her family as slaves. There are still black Barretts living there today. I wouldn't doubt that we have that connection. I went through the male Barrett DNA listing. Do you know anything about the Barretts from that part of Texas?

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        • #5
          andalucia7, My wife's family is from Shelby Co., TX. We drive through Anderson Co. several times a year.

          I know there are a lot of Barretts in that part of the state, but I don't know of a connection to them. I do have a distant connection to the Barretts of Madison Co.

          Where is the Barrett Quarter?

          Please feel free to contact me at [email protected]

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          • #6
            A thought

            Originally posted by andalucia7
            Note that I found two genetic matches on this site who are both Hawaiian. That was news! I'd appreciate some feedback from anyone who understands this and who has expertise about African-Americans in my haplogroup.
            I found this forum while Googling a connection between Hawai'ians and North Africa. I read a book called "Secret Science Behind Miracles" by Max Freedom Long. It was written in the 1940's. I was attempting to confirm Long's theory.

            According to Long, Hawai'ians originated in Africa. He says they left North Africa before Christ. He basis this idea on information he received from a man who claimed to have met the last Qahuna of the Berber Tribe of Africa. He had begun Qahuna training with this woman but it was cut short when she was killed. According to this man the magic language of the Berber Quahuna was almost identical to the language of the Hawai'ians, most especially the language used by Hawai'ian Kahunas.

            Long states that the Hawai'ians claimed to have come from a very far off land, that they knew stories of the Old Testament, and that they brought plants with them from Africa.

            In Googling this the only references I found to a Hawai'ian/African connection were plants. Of course, I'd only been searching for about 10 minutes when I came across this post.

            I'd love to hear your thoughts on this.

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