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The Beaker Phenomenon and the Genomic Transformation of NW Europe

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  • The Beaker Phenomenon and the Genomic Transformation of NW Europe

    I was really surprised not to see a thread here on the monumental paper, The Beaker Phenomenon and the Genomic Transformation of Northwest Europe.

    Incredibly important paper.

  • #2
    Thanks for sharing this!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Stevo View Post
      I was really surprised not to see a thread here on the monumental paper, The Beaker Phenomenon and the Genomic Transformation of Northwest Europe.

      Incredibly important paper.
      There has been discussion of a maritime Neolithic migration to Iberia. However, the origin of the migration is not clear. Perhaps it was from Cyprus. Interesting, that two co-authors of the present paper, Lazaridis and Reich had discovered a Levantine farming area distinct from the Asia Minor-Danube area. DNA Land found a connection between Cyprus and the Levant.

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      • #4
        Non-Iberian Bell Beaker had little or no Iberian autosomal dna. Autosomally, it was a combination of Yamnaya, WHG, and Neolithic farmer dna that most closely resembled GAC + Swedish TRB. Since GAC (Globular Amphora Culture) and TRB (Funnel Beaker) inhabited the North European Plain, that component traces the path Bell Beaker males took from the Russian steppe into central and western Europe.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Stevo View Post
          Non-Iberian Bell Beaker had little or no Iberian autosomal dna. Autosomally, it was a combination of Yamnaya, WHG, and Neolithic farmer dna that most closely resembled GAC + Swedish TRB. Since GAC (Globular Amphora Culture) and TRB (Funnel Beaker) inhabited the North European Plain, that component traces the path Bell Beaker males took from the Russian steppe into central and western Europe.
          My guess is that the maritime Neolithic migration affected southern Iberia and North Africa. Northern Iberia was more affected by the Danube Neolithic migration and the Metal or Kurgan migration from the steppe(with some origins from the Iranian Neolithic area)

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          • #6
            My ancestry is pretty evenly mixed German (Rhineland-Pfalz, Hesse, Wurttemberg) and English. I show little Iberian in my DNA, but consistently show Indo-Iranian in small amounts. My wife is overwhelming English, with a little German-Speaking Swiss. She shows a significant amount of Iberian in her DNA (in MyHeritage she shows 22% Iberian). Am I understanding correctly that British show more Iberian because people from that region moved up the coast into the British Isles? And that I show less Iberian & some Indo-Iranian because more of my ancestors came from the steppes?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by NCroots View Post
              My ancestry is pretty evenly mixed German (Rhineland-Pfalz, Hesse, Wurttemberg) and English. I show little Iberian in my DNA, but consistently show Indo-Iranian in small amounts. My wife is overwhelming English, with a little German-Speaking Swiss. She shows a significant amount of Iberian in her DNA (in MyHeritage she shows 22% Iberian). Am I understanding correctly that British show more Iberian because people from that region moved up the coast into the British Isles? And that I show less Iberian & some Indo-Iranian because more of my ancestors came from the steppes?
              Possibly. I am familiar with Mt J1c lines that moved from an Ice Age refuge in Basque country to Ireland. There is some dispute as to whether the migration was before or during the Neolithic era.
              Although it is not noted in Ancient Origins "Metal" line, Lazaridis and Reich found that a mixture of Iranian farmers and Caucasian hunter gatherers contributed to the development of the steppe culture. It was also the case that some steppe people migrated eastward to central Asia.

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