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Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.

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  • Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.

    Curr Biol. 2016 Feb 23. pii: S0960-9822(16)00078-6. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.028. [Epub ahead of print]
    http://www.cell.com/current-biology/...showall%3Dtrue

    open access
    Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.
    Bergström A1, Nagle N2, Chen Y1, McCarthy S1, Pollard MO3, Ayub Q1, Wilcox S4, Wilcox L2, van Oorschot RA5, McAllister P6, Williams L7, Xue Y1, Mitchell RJ8, Tyler-Smith C9.

    Abstract
    Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C∗, present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia.

  • #2
    do you realise how far india is from australia

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    • #3
      Originally posted by shentonjim View Post
      do you realise how far india is from australia
      Do you realise that people in Australia got there somehow? Most likely from Africa!

      Mr W

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      • #4
        I have noticed that most analysese of native Australian y-DNA seems to show both the C haplogroup, as well as one or more highly derived branches of the K haplogroup. Since the latter didn't exist 47,000 years ago, it would seem that the first migration would have been comprised of C+ men, followed by a later migration that involved K+ men, probably from Indonesia.

        Timothy Peterman

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        • #5
          Aboriginal connection

          Hello,
          I am Aboriginal and wonder where this is reflected in my results.

          Someone has uploaded on GEDmatch a genome of an Australian Aboriginal who lived in the 19th century. http://gigadb.org/dataset/100010 This GEDmatch kit number is Z905945

          I compared mine (I am European and Aboriginal background) with this "100% Aboriginal" man's sample. Here's my results compared to his -MDLP K23b Oracle calculator:

          Aboriginal man:
          **
          South_Indian
          4.35
          Australoid
          51.38
          Melano_Polynesian
          39.18
          South_East_Asian
          2.58

          Mine:
          **
          South_Central_Asian
          4.19
          South_Indian
          2.59
          Australoid
          0.41
          Melano_Polynesian
          0.08

          Any thoughts on this would be appreciated as I am new to understanding how to interpret these results

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