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Large Y descent clusters

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  • 1798
    replied
    "Family Tree DNA estimate that approximately 1.3% of males in Western Europe share this most common genetic 12-marker signature."


    "WAMH is the modal haplotype of R1b-L11 and predominates in two subclades of L11 - R1b-P312 and R1b-U106. It is also common in R1b-L21, a subclade of P312. It is recommended that anyone with the WAMH who wishes to determine their R1b subclade should join the R1b and subclades project and seek advice from the project administrators about which tests or individual SNPs to order. Alternatively advice can be sought from the R1b mailing list. It is sometimes possible to predict a more downstream subclade of P312 or U106 from a 67-marker haplotype. If the participant has close matches at 67 markers the prediction can sometimes be informed by the SNP status of his matches. Single SNPs can be ordered from FTDNA or YSEQ."

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  • 192971
    replied
    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Western_At...odal_Haplotype

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by 192971 View Post
    1798, give also your Y-12 Ancestral Origins percentages per country. Absolute numbers are a bad measure when we know that the data is biased.

    The WAMH haplotype is 13,24,14,11,11,14,12,12,12,13,13,29 and it is not mine.

    For my haplotype Ireland and France 1.7% and that is the best at 12 markers.

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  • 192971
    replied
    1798, give also your Y-12 Ancestral Origins percentages per country. Absolute numbers are a bad measure when we know that the data is biased.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    What we see in the databases is biased by the fact that private genetic testing is illegal in France. A few people do it anyway, and there is academic data, but this could go a long way to accounting for why there is a bias towards the islands. I'd like to see how many kits FT and Geno 2 have done from Holland, Belgium, Spain and Portugal.

    Come to think of it, the forensic reference database might be more representative, since they aren't restricted by law in France and they try to distribute their reference testing evenly.
    I examined the WAMH 12 marker haplotype in ysearch.
    Isles 1000 plus matches.
    Western Europe 345
    Eastern Europe 47
    Scandinavia 35

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  • PNGarrison
    replied
    What we see in the databases is biased by the fact that private genetic testing is illegal in France. A few people do it anyway, and there is academic data, but this could go a long way to accounting for why there is a bias towards the islands. I'd like to see how many kits FT and Geno 2 have done from Holland, Belgium, Spain and Portugal.

    Come to think of it, the forensic reference database might be more representative, since they aren't restricted by law in France and they try to distribute their reference testing evenly.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by MMaddi View Post
    Is this your impression or do you actually have some numbers for this? Have you taken into account that people with British Isles ancestry are heavily overrepresented in the databases, skewing the distribution of WAMH from what it actually may be? If so, have you made an adjustment in your estimate to compensate for the skewing?

    These are elementary questions of statistical analysis that you should consider.
    All you have to do is ask anyone who has the WAMH badge to tell you where the percentages of their 12 marker matches come from. It is all in their FTDNA homepages.

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  • MMaddi
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    The majority of testers with the WAMH have origins in the Isles. Why do you think that is ?
    Is this your impression or do you actually have some numbers for this? Have you taken into account that people with British Isles ancestry are heavily overrepresented in the databases, skewing the distribution of WAMH from what it actually may be? If so, have you made an adjustment in your estimate to compensate for the skewing?

    These are elementary questions of statistical analysis that you should consider.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    The majority of testers with the WAMH have origins in the Isles. Why do you think that is ?
    The fact that the WAMH is found in both P312 and U106 clades of R1b leads some posters to think that L11 and WAMH are contemporary. I don't think anyone is happy with an Isles origin for L11 but the Paris Basin could be the place. The 40% ancient autosomal dna from northern France to Britain might be a clue.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    My understanding is that the WAMH is a widely observed pattern. What this paper identified is a handful of closely defined haplotypes that occur in unusually large numbers of individuals. The majority of haplotypes occurred in one individual in their sample. The ones they focused on occurred in 9-70 individuals. Haplotypes were not included in a cluster that did have the same SNP haplotype as the rest.

    There are certainly SNP clades in U106 and P312 that are numerically much more successful than others. It might be interesting for the population geneticists to try to figure out whether that reflects different ancient expansions or more recent differences.
    The majority of testers with the WAMH have origins in the Isles. Why do you think that is ?

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  • PNGarrison
    replied
    My understanding is that the WAMH is a widely observed pattern. What this paper identified is a handful of closely defined haplotypes that occur in unusually large numbers of individuals. The majority of haplotypes occurred in one individual in their sample. The ones they focused on occurred in 9-70 individuals. Haplotypes were not included in a cluster that did have the same SNP haplotype as the rest.

    There are certainly SNP clades in U106 and P312 that are numerically much more successful than others. It might be interesting for the population geneticists to try to figure out whether that reflects different ancient expansions or more recent differences.
    Last edited by PNGarrison; 23 March 2015, 03:54 AM.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    This question and answer was posted on another forum today.
    "Couldn't M-222 reasonably be a La Tene marker in the Isles?"

    "I doubt if it arrived from the Continent with La Tene. It seems to me more probably home-grown. I just suspect that it moved to Ireland from Britain with La Tene."

    These two people know absolutely nothing about Irish history and the person who answered is trying to rewrite Irish history. That person is not Irish.
    If M222 is the Niall of the Nine Hostages signature then M222's ancestors came from Iberia not Britain.

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  • 1798
    replied
    This question and answer was posted on another forum today.
    "Couldn't M-222 reasonably be a La Tene marker in the Isles?"

    "I doubt if it arrived from the Continent with La Tene. It seems to me more probably home-grown. I just suspect that it moved to Ireland from Britain with La Tene."

    These two people know absolutely nothing about Irish history and the person who answered is trying to rewrite Irish history. That person is not Irish.

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  • 1798
    replied
    "The subconscious mind is a composite of everything one sees, hears and any information the mind collects that it cannot otherwise consciously process to make meaningful sense. The conscious mind cannot always absorb disconnected information, as it would be an information overload, so the subconscious mind stores this information where it can be retrieved by the conscious mind when it needs to defend itself for survival (and for other reasons, such as solving puzzles)."

    The history of our species lie herein but we are unable to access it.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    "A few of the R1b male lines in Ireland are close but the majority aren't. I don't believe in the one man and 40 wifes theory. It didn't happen for a well known King Henry.He had no son's."

    It certainly wasn't the norm. I didn't mean too close - just the same large tribe. The population geneticists have found that up until the Neolithic (roughly) the effective population size for men was much less than for women. A simple way to interpret that is that the strong, fast, mighty hunter types were getting way more than their share of the women. About 10,000 years ago the ratio goes to near 1, suggesting that with farming came monogamy, at least on average. But it's clear that there were exceptions in big kings with big harems. The point of the OT telling us that Solomon had 300 wives and 1000 concubines was to say that he was the greatest king of all, like an American saying Babe Ruth hit a million home runs.

    Over some broad areas of Asia it has been estimated that 3% of the men are in that descent cluster that may well be Genghis Khan's. As time went on harem gathering and a ton of children faded away, but here and there it probably happened. I don't know what the anthropologists have found that would be relevant to Bronze Age patterns in Europe. There certainly were some kings/chieftains that could have supported a lot of wives/children and they had no belief system that I know of that would have prohibited it. Islam probably kept the practice alive in some places in the Middle East later on by giving it religious sanction.
    They are assuming that men who have the same haplotype today came from one man with 40 wives 2000 ybp. But, just like today we have lots of men with the WAMH so 6000 years from now the scientists will think that their male population all came from one man.

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