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Large Y descent clusters

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Jomid59 View Post
    Mitochondrial mutations may drive Y chromosome evolution.

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...FV9u5Lq91T_VXA
    If you look at the M222 haplotypes in the NW of Ireland there is very little variation in them.It must be something to do with the females whose husbands,fathers and grandfathers are M222 also.

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  • Jomid59
    replied
    Mitochondrial mutations may drive Y chromosome evolution.

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...FV9u5Lq91T_VXA

    Leave a comment:


  • Jomid59
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    The FMS results are in the Bam file that comes with the Big-Y results.
    Thank you. Did not know that.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Jomid59 View Post
    Can you reference the source for that please.

    My understanding was that Mitochondrial DNA is only found in Mitochondria.
    Autosomal and sex DNA are only found in cell nuclei.
    The FMS results are in the Bam file that comes with the Big-Y results.

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  • Jomid59
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    FMS can be sequenced from Big Y results. Why is that? What part does the female play in the Y.
    Can you reference the source for that please.

    My understanding was that Mitochondrial DNA is only found in Mitochondria.
    Autosomal and sex DNA are only found in cell nuclei.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    The number of new mutations occurring in any part of the genome will depend on the genetic background of genes coding for DNA replication and repair, and those genes are all over the autosomes, so yes the chromosomes a man gets from his mother will have an effect on mutations that occur in the DNA that he passes on, if that's what you mean.
    FMS can be sequenced from Big Y results. Why is that? What part does the female play in the Y.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    The number of new mutations occurring in any part of the genome will depend on the genetic background of genes coding for DNA replication and repair, and those genes are all over the autosomes, so yes the chromosomes a man gets from his mother will have an effect on mutations that occur in the DNA that he passes on, if that's what you mean.
    A lot of the M222 group are very close at 67 markers and they have a very strong genetic signature. Why do you think that is?

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  • PNGarrison
    replied
    The number of new mutations occurring in any part of the genome will depend on the genetic background of genes coding for DNA replication and repair, and those genes are all over the autosomes, so yes the chromosomes a man gets from his mother will have an effect on mutations that occur in the DNA that he passes on, if that's what you mean.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMaddi
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    Can the female have a role in the number of mutations on the Y chromosome?
    Try searching Google Scholar - http://scholar.google.com/?hl=en - for something like "y chromosome mutations" and review the results. Then, if you do find something that supports your idea, report back to us. If you do, please provide a link and also quote the relevant text that backs up your idea.

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  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    Oh, come on Ciaran. Enlighten us. Telling us that you know the answer, but you won't say what it is, is not exactly speaking you mind.
    Can the female have a role in the number of mutations on the Y chromosome?

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
    Oh, come on Ciaran. Enlighten us. Telling us that you know the answer, but you won't say what it is, is not exactly speaking you mind.
    I did not say that I knew the answer. I may have a few ideas about dna but if I shared them I would be accused of being a crackpot.

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  • MMaddi
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    I did.
    Ciaran has spoken! All further scientific knowledge or questions are futile since the world's leading authority has decided the question. If only the oracle of Delphi were around, we would know what Ciaran's judgement is, since he won't tell us himself.

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  • PNGarrison
    replied
    Oh, come on Ciaran. Enlighten us. Telling us that you know the answer, but you won't say what it is, is not exactly speaking you mind.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by MikeP View Post
    1798, why don't you speak your mind?
    I did.

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  • MikeP
    replied
    1798, why don't you speak your mind?

    Leave a comment:

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