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Large Y descent clusters

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  • #16
    Mitochondrial mutations may drive Y chromosome evolution.

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...FV9u5Lq91T_VXA

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Jomid59 View Post
      Mitochondrial mutations may drive Y chromosome evolution.

      http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...FV9u5Lq91T_VXA
      If you look at the M222 haplotypes in the NW of Ireland there is very little variation in them.It must be something to do with the females whose husbands,fathers and grandfathers are M222 also.

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      • #18
        I would guess the reason they can get mtDNA results out of Big Y is that the affinity purification that FT uses to get Y fragments isn't perfect and mtDNA is present at such high copy numbers that there is still some there in the sample after the purification.

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        • #19
          What does the TMRCA calculation look like for M222? If it is fairly young, that might account for low variation in the haplotypes. If that doesn't it might be an interesting point if the microsatellite mutation rate is lower in that population than others. The U106 admins who look at a lot of haplotypes say that they see lineages that seem unusually stable and unusually unstable. I think they should communicate with the researchers who study microsatellite mutation. It might be that these are within the range of known variation or it could be something new.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
            What does the TMRCA calculation look like for M222? If it is fairly young, that might account for low variation in the haplotypes. If that doesn't it might be an interesting point if the microsatellite mutation rate is lower in that population than others. The U106 admins who look at a lot of haplotypes say that they see lineages that seem unusually stable and unusually unstable. I think they should communicate with the researchers who study microsatellite mutation. It might be that these are within the range of known variation or it could be something new.
            Yfull gives a TMRCA of 1,850 for M222 and for the next upstream SNP 4,200. That is not right.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
              What does the TMRCA calculation look like for M222? If it is fairly young, that might account for low variation in the haplotypes. If that doesn't it might be an interesting point if the microsatellite mutation rate is lower in that population than others. The U106 admins who look at a lot of haplotypes say that they see lineages that seem unusually stable and unusually unstable. I think they should communicate with the researchers who study microsatellite mutation. It might be that these are within the range of known variation or it could be something new.
              The TMRCA for P312 at present is 4,700 ybp and there are 8 SNPs downstream from P312 to M222 then the TMRCA for M222 must be around 3,600. Lots of M222+ testers are a GD of 5 at 67 markers from the modal!!!

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              • #22
                Ultimately, it is the female who decides which Y haplogroup her son belongs to and is it accidental, coincidental or something else?

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                • #23
                  Y chromosome mutations

                  Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                  Can the female have a role in the number of mutations on the Y chromosome?
                  No. The Y chromosome is carried by the male father's sperm and, unlike other chromosomes, doesn't recombine with its partner -- an X within the female mother's egg.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by rt-sails View Post
                    No. The Y chromosome is carried by the male father's sperm and, unlike other chromosomes, doesn't recombine with its partner -- an X within the female mother's egg.
                    True, with an exception of the pseudoautosomal regions
                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoautosomal_region

                    W. (Mr.)

                    P.S. No, books on genetics did not need to be rewritten from scratch

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                      Ultimately, it is the female who decides which Y haplogroup her son belongs to and is it accidental, coincidental or something else?
                      What...the...****?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by N21163 View Post
                        What...the...****?
                        I think 1798 meant precisely that word...

                        Although, there was no smiley

                        And no context.

                        Ultimately, it was neither funny, nor meaningful for a post in the Scientific Papers sub-forum.

                        W. (Mr.)

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by dna View Post
                          I think 1798 meant precisely that word...

                          Although, there was no smiley

                          And no context.

                          Ultimately, it was neither funny, nor meaningful for a post in the Scientific Papers sub-forum.

                          W. (Mr.)
                          You don't understand what I wrote. A woman always decides who is going to be the father of her children.
                          1798
                          Registered User
                          Last edited by 1798; 21 March 2015, 01:11 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                            You don't understand what I wrote. A woman always decides who is going to be the father of her children.
                            Wikipedia
                            "The adaptation of sperm traits, such as length, viability and velocity might be constrained by the influence of cytoplasmic DNA (e.g. mitochondrial DNA);[40] mitochondrial DNA is inherited from the mother only and it is thought that this could represent a constraint in the evolution of sperm."

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by PNGarrison View Post
                              What does the TMRCA calculation look like for M222? If it is fairly young, that might account for low variation in the haplotypes. If that doesn't it might be an interesting point if the microsatellite mutation rate is lower in that population than others. The U106 admins who look at a lot of haplotypes say that they see lineages that seem unusually stable and unusually unstable. I think they should communicate with the researchers who study microsatellite mutation. It might be that these are within the range of known variation or it could be something new.
                              The lack of diversity among the haplotypes of the M222 males in NW Ireland shows that this is a homogeneous population. Isn't that right?

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                              • #30
                                Well I have noticed that women think they have deep intuitive insights, but in the cases who don't have SNP typing available to them, I doubt that this extends to picking what Y SNP type to mate with.

                                The high percentages of P312 and M222 certainly indicate an influx of fairly closed related males and probably the high numerical success of some dominant males before St. Patrick frowned on polygamy. It'll will be interesting to see the results of the Irish project.

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