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  • German? No, English...

    All my life I was under the impression that my paternal heritage was German. I then became interested in genealogy and started tracing my ancestors. Following my father

  • #2
    Originally posted by dickmotz View Post
    All my life I was under the impression that my paternal heritage was German. I then became interested in genealogy and started tracing my ancestors. Following my father
    I am guessing you texted from a cell phone. I used to have a phone that let me text until infinity, but after pressing 'submit' I would see that only the beginning was posted. Now I have phone that lets me know when to stop. My superhuge posts are from when I am on regular computer.

    Is your surname MOTZ actually MOTTS? Or is the M your middle initial? If so, then did you find that your OTZ is actually OATS?

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    • #3
      Another German??

      You think you have a problem. I grew up knowing that I was adopted, but being told that my bio-father was German and my bio-mother was English/Irish. I had no other info regarding my bio-parents for 59 years. I also had no means of tracking through my adoption. My adoptive parents provided no information.

      Last year my 2 of my bio-half sisters located me. They had known my birthdate, surname, hospital, City of birth but an incorrect first and middle names. Through diligent search, they located me. I have now found that the ancestry of my bio-mother was correct, but my bio-father is in doubt.

      It is likely that the doctor of my bio-mother made an assumption as she was divorced from a man with a German surname. My bio-mother entered the hospital using the surname of my adoptive parents (adoption pre-arranged) and there is no indication of the identity of my bio-father.

      My bio-mother had nine children, possibly with nine fathers. She was only married three times, but no children with the first.

      The first child was fathered by a man who sired at least 5 and possibly 9 children. He abandoned all but 3 of the children. As I was the second child and concieved only 6 months after the still-birth of the first child, I am testing Y-DNA37 against the direct grandson of this person. Perhaps he is my father too.

      So my heridity is still in question, perhaps Y-DNA will provide an answer. It has already eliminated one possible bio-father.

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      • #4
        Good Luck with your ydna tests, JP.
        I hope you find out who your bio-father was/is.
        I wasn't adopted, my mother kept me even though people, including my grandmother, told her to put me up for adoption. It was a hard life for both of us that I wouldn't wish on anyone.
        I am my mother's only child. My father has sired an unknown number of children but has said that as far as he is concerned he has only one child- a son (who doesn't look like him at all and I doubt is his biological son).
        My bio-father (we had a paternity test done thru family court) considers himself Czech, but I traced the line to Slovakia, but dead-ends in the late 1800s. I can't do a ydna test because I am female, but I am happy that my 23andme Relative Finder match in Slovakia has finally accepted the invite and says his family is about 100 km from my paper trail ancestors village.
        Last edited by rainbow; 18 April 2010, 11:11 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dickmotz View Post
          All my life I was under the impression that my paternal heritage was German. I then became interested in genealogy and started tracing my ancestors. Following my father
          I wouldn't abandon the family tradition that your paternal line is German merely because of y-dna testing. The databases are so overwhelmingly British Isles-biased that nearly every guy who gets an R1b1b2 result of some kind gets the idea there was an NPE in his family tree and that the interloper was an Englishman, a Scot, a Welshman, or an Irishman.

          We really need to increase our continental sampling somehow.

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          • #6
            Isn't the National Geographic still taking samples from all over the world?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dickmotz View Post
              All my life I was under the impression that my paternal heritage was German. I then became interested in genealogy and started tracing my ancestors. Following my father
              The above reminds me of that kid's game where one person starts a story then another picks it up mid sentence.

              Dickmotz, where are you?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darroll View Post
                Isn't the National Geographic still taking samples from all over the world?
                I think the Genographic Project has focused on the Third World, and its results are not in FTDNA's Ancestral Origins database or in Ysearch (with a few exceptions).

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