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Family Rumor Was True

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  • Family Rumor Was True

    Hi,

    Several years ago, I volunteered to participate in the National Geographic Genographic project. The results were interesting, but nothing very earth shattering since it dealt with whole populations and not individuals. I filed the info away and did not think any more about it.

    Several years passed. One day, I was surfing the web and saw FtDNA could import the genographic results for free. So out of curiosity I gave it a try.

    After importing, I did a search for matches. Virtually all of the matches were named "Ewing". My name is "Smith". It was immediately clear a family rumor my father once mentioned was in fact true.

    The basic (now vindicated) facts are the following. My great-great-grandfather was allegedly either impotent or sterile. Through some kind of arrangement with the family physician (named Ewing), all of the Smith children were in fact sired by the doctor. This happened in Alabama in the mid-1800s.

    For those interested in more detailed info, here is a URL:
    http://www.ewingfamilyassociation.or...ith/smith.html

  • #2
    An extraordinary example of family matching.

    And another Ewing dynasty.

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    • #3
      What a great story! Thanks for sharing.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by calouste View Post
        What a great story! Thanks for sharing.
        You're welcome. Didn't see the response till today. Now, I've subscribed to my own thread.

        Comment


        • #5
          What a great story! Jerome Coleman Smith has been vindicated!

          In his book Blood of the Isles, Bryan Sykes did talk about "old stories". There are often shreds of truth to myths and legends, which the archeologists won't be able to scratch up.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sbarr10 View Post
            What a great story! Jerome Coleman Smith has been vindicated!

            In his book Blood of the Isles, Bryan Sykes did talk about "old stories". There are often shreds of truth to myths and legends, which the archeologists won't be able to scratch up.
            Well, for the record, it was JC who was the doc's son. Still, pretty cool eh?

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            • #7
              Reminds me of that recent news story where that "fertility physician" was the donor for most of his infertile patients. Imagine those DNA results years from now. "Momma's Baby, Papa's Maybe" - Red Fox, comedian.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Krootie View Post
                Reminds me of that recent news story where that "fertility physician" was the donor for most of his infertile patients. Imagine those DNA results years from now. "Momma's Baby, Papa's Maybe" - Red Fox, comedian.
                Exactly. Its fascinating to me how a doctor could talk a man into letting him impregnate his wife. This was in Alabama in the late 1870s.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gamename View Post
                  Exactly. Its fascinating to me how a doctor could talk a man into letting him impregnate his wife. This was in Alabama in the late 1870s.
                  Donor sperm (provided by natural insemmination, i.e. sex) is still a popular treatment for infertiliity. Infertility is a social stigma, and in those days being childless had serious social and financial impact. I think the doctor was doing the family a favor. Hopefully the doctor would not talk about it due to professionalism (and his own reputation), and having the doctor as the father would result in the children's improved medical care and financial benefit. It was a wise move on all sides -- and compassionate in regard to his wife -- for Mr. Smith to do what he did. It certainly is not an "affair" I do not think as it was described in the article.

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                  • #10
                    Great story

                    When I read your story my antenna went up as I read the name Kyle. I'm related to the Kyles that settled in Morgan Co. Alabama. And not only the Kyles but others . I don't know about Smiths or Ewings but a lot of my ancestors lived in that area from Floyd Co. Ga. to Tippah Miss.
                    My Kyle was Samuel who was 96 in 1860 so he could have kin to the Kyle in will.
                    Sometimes its a small world.

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                    • #11
                      My Mother's family also had family lore about Snyder not being the family's real name.

                      My Aunt told me in 1996 that they believed the family name to be Canaris. I searched that name for a couple of years on and off to no avail.

                      Then about 3 months ago, I get contacted from a Knerr family member and they tell me that they believe my Snyder ancestor is actually their lost Knerr ancestor's brother!

                      I have a Snyder 1st cousin that lives in my area that I am going to ask to participate in conducting a DNA comparison between him and the Knerr family member.

                      I will have to post our results.

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