Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I finaly know who I am

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I finaly know who I am

    I want to deeply thank all who post their stories and all the familytree DNA folks, the scientist and staff for helping me to understand how to use my DNA to trace my birth family. My Mother died young when I was 9 and their were alot of family and stories that I took for granted. I am now the sole survivor of my immediate birth family thus I had to use my Mother's and Grandmother's stories to piece my ancestry together, and of course my Brookville, Ohio Historical Society. Now I have my megaplus mtdna results and I now at the age of 62 am truly beginning to understand why my family did not talk about the past much. Since searching for my ancestry I found out my Grandmother wrote "Other" on her social security for race, how my father's family Blonde hair and light skin and my Mother's Black hair and gray blues eyes and tawny skin fits into my genetics. I now know from my brother's and my own DNA that at last I know I am my Father's and Mother's Daughter and my brother's sister. I am of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry and my mtdna results told me my ancestry goes back to Central Africa, Banqui and Cape Verde which I now have linked to my own research; I am multiracial, multiethnic and multicultural; everyone always assumed I was white because of my light skin but I have the privilege to announce I have almost every racial, ethnic, and cultural dna known and some they say is a very rare variant. I feel whole now and will continue to search for the missing names...in both my paternal and maternal dna. Thank you for your stories and testimonies and encouragement and assistance for without you I would have remained forever never knowing who I was but my dna pretty much matches what my maternal grandmother told me her Mother told her; our family is worldly in our bloodline; my paternal grandmother always said we are from everywhere possible throughout time. I thought they were just avoiding my questions but they were accurate with my DNA, thanks so much I will forever be blessed and be able to give my children and their children this information so they will know who they are and will have an enormous family tree as soon as I complete it. Forever greatful to all of you. annamarie

  • #2
    Good news. Good for you.
    Last edited by rainbow; 17 August 2009, 07:17 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      thank you

      so nice to see your reply and your username is so beautifully inspiring; It was hard growing up as an "Other" and the healing now was worth the wait; for my parents and ancestors it was a lot more oppressive for them than me but the frustration in my generation took its toll; like being caught between being human and "other". I have Golding's in my family also, I learned from my grandmother that she was Amerindian and Iberian Celtic, and Jewish heart and converted Catholic faith. and thought that our ancestory went back to the aborginese in Siberia and greatgrandmother told her that were were Sioux, choctaw,catabaw,Chickasaw, Chickasee and Cherokee but I have not figured out how to verify all of those specifics to percentages; looks like you have worked hard to learn all that. Org. CRS stated that alot of my dna did not match anything and my assumption was that grandma was correct that my Jewish and Native American genes were there but I look Finnish and Portuguese My HVR1 is 16357C and 16519C and HVR2 is 263G and 316.1C and I only halfway understand that except my megaplus test certainly narrowed possiblities down enough to match most of them. The coded regions are 750C, 1438.G,3010A,4769G,8860B,9078C,15326G,15646T. At least now I know from scientists and familytreedna that I am not alone anymore.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi. Thanks
        I haven't done the megaplus/fgs.
        Did FTDNA or mitosearch give you any exact, full matches?

        Comment


        • #5
          megaplus

          Hi, yes, my dna testing gave me several exact matches on the higher markers. My last megaplus gave me 4 names of exact matches and added to the others I was able to find direct connections. The remarkable part was that throughout the testings regardless of the level of markers there were clues of distant relatives and I emailed some of those matches and realized almost everyone I contacted came through the Cumberland Gap and the highest matches gave me their relatives surnames and I gave them mine and it has been an incredible journey to figure out ancestral journeys. One example would be that on my 25 marker the surname Barr came up over and over; I went to my historical society downtown and they helped me track that name through plot maps back to 1800 and that family had a farm next to my Great Grandparents which turned out to be 1 mile from where I live. The next surprise was that on my 37 markers several names of ancestor's on their family tree matched both of my parents ancestral names; paternal and maternal. That's when things got so interesting that I rarely slept and was researching till dawn. It turned out that my mother and father were related to this common ancestor; it was my Mother's Great Great Aunt who was married to my Father's Great Great Uncle. There have been so many matches I have not had time to research them all but one of the best resources has been land, military, and old bible records. I was amazed even at 12 markers the clue of Africa was more accurate then I thought; on my megaplus it said that paternally it was Cape Verde which made sense because my Father had told me that Johannesburg Africa was the land of some of his forefathers hundreds of years ago. My Mother's also descended from Africa; org. tests thought it was Shara Desert and each test gave me markers to track backwards and so I tracked my more recent markers and was able to identify their travel lands and some religions. The hardest part has been the changes of names; some misspelled, some intentional changes, some phoneical spellings; If it was not for others doing their research I could not have connected so many so quickly. I know that doing my family tree dna through national genographic projects is the best gift I could have ever received and the most remarkable history lesson of my lifetime.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by amjb09 View Post
            Hi, yes, my dna testing gave me several exact matches on the higher markers. My last megaplus gave me 4 names of exact matches and added to the others I was able to find direct connections. The remarkable part was that throughout the testings regardless of the level of markers there were clues of distant relatives and I emailed some of those matches and realized almost everyone I contacted came through the Cumberland Gap and the highest matches gave me their relatives surnames and I gave them mine and it has been an incredible journey to figure out ancestral journeys. One example would be that on my 25 marker the surname Barr came up over and over; I went to my historical society downtown and they helped me track that name through plot maps back to 1800 and that family had a farm next to my Great Grandparents which turned out to be 1 mile from where I live. The next surprise was that on my 37 markers several names of ancestor's on their family tree matched both of my parents ancestral names; paternal and maternal. That's when things got so interesting that I rarely slept and was researching till dawn. It turned out that my mother and father were related to this common ancestor; it was my Mother's Great Great Aunt who was married to my Father's Great Great Uncle. There have been so many matches I have not had time to research them all but one of the best resources has been land, military, and old bible records. I was amazed even at 12 markers the clue of Africa was more accurate then I thought; on my megaplus it said that paternally it was Cape Verde which made sense because my Father had told me that Johannesburg Africa was the land of some of his forefathers hundreds of years ago. My Mother's also descended from Africa; org. tests thought it was Shara Desert and each test gave me markers to track backwards and so I tracked my more recent markers and was able to identify their travel lands and some religions. The hardest part has been the changes of names; some misspelled, some intentional changes, some phoneical spellings; If it was not for others doing their research I could not have connected so many so quickly. I know that doing my family tree dna through national genographic projects is the best gift I could have ever received and the most remarkable history lesson of my lifetime.
            Now THAT'S a great success story. Congratulations M'am and keep your hopes alive for the rest of us!

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you for such an inspiring post. It can be hard having parts of your family history shrouded in mystery. A lot of people don't understand how a person can grow up not knowing many facts about family history due to time separation between the generations. These tests have helped a lot of people, including me, get basic facts and get oriented in the right direction to make the little you know about your family a lot more valuable.

              Best wishes to you and I hope your knowledge of your current family and ancestors continue to grow.

              Comment


              • #8
                Final Proof

                Although I have been able to trace my family back to approximately 1699, using Church records and the British Census returns there was one person I couldn't find any documentation for, my Great Grandfather, all his siblings were registered, and were Baptised in the same church, apart from one 'brother', who turned out to be a Nurse Child, after many years of being able to find proof I decided to take a yDNA test, after I received my results I approached a descendant of one of my G/Grandfather's brothers and asked him if he would do likewise, to my surprise he agreed, a few weeks later the results arrived, and proved to be a 100% match, which was the best news ever, so now I'm trying to find a volunteer from a descendant of whom I believe to be my 5 X G/Grandfather's brother, which, if positive will take me back to at least the early 1600's.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Apology

                  I am sorry, I didn't mean to add to this thread, the above post has been re-submitted as a separate thread.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It was fascinating. I enjoyed reading everyone's posts (amjb09 and jimbogilly etc).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow great story of your life. Can make a movie on this.. Thanks for sharing.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Inspiring story! Thanks for sharing it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          what a great story, annamarie!

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X