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Acadian Amerindian Success Story

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  • Acadian Amerindian Success Story

    I am a Cajun from Louisiana, descended from the Acadians from Nova Scotia. I have always known I had American Indian blood on both sides of my family but always assumed it was from Louisiana. Through research, I found out my Dad's Indian blood actually comes from Canada, and is Mi'kmaq.
    so when I got the results of my Y DNA test I was really surprised. My surname is French and I have traced my family back 14 generations. It turns out my haplogroup is C3, American Indian. Almost all of my closest matches are Indian. My surname is French, but my ancestors using it were not.
    Historically, there was a great deal of intermarriage between the Acadians and the Mi'kmaq. Who would have known so many people with Mi'kmaq blood would end up in Louisiana, so far from their homeland?

  • #2
    Originally posted by ragincajun View Post
    I am a Cajun from Louisiana, descended from the Acadians from Nova Scotia. I have always known I had American Indian blood on both sides of my family but always assumed it was from Louisiana. Through research, I found out my Dad's Indian blood actually comes from Canada, and is Mi'kmaq.
    so when I got the results of my Y DNA test I was really surprised. My surname is French and I have traced my family back 14 generations. It turns out my haplogroup is C3, American Indian. Almost all of my closest matches are Indian. My surname is French, but my ancestors using it were not.
    Historically, there was a great deal of intermarriage between the Acadians and the Mi'kmaq. Who would have known so many people with Mi'kmaq blood would end up in Louisiana, so far from their homeland?
    That is a great story!!! Do you match anyone with the same Acadian surname?

    Whereabouts in Nova Scotia? A large portion of my family tree comes from Nova Scotia and the rest of the Canadian Maritimes. Some of my Nova Scotian ancestors have French last names...... although they came to Canada at a different time.

    Good luck in your searches!

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    • #3
      That is a great story. I don't have ancestors from Nova Scotia. I know that there w

      Oops. I texted in the title section.

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      • #4
        Thanks for sharing your story. You're the only Amerindian Ydna person on this forum that I know of or can remember. A few have Amerindian Mtdna.

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        • #5
          Thanks, guys. There are two other relatives currently testing right now, so we are waiting for their results. Spruithean, a lot of my ancestors lived in the Port Royal area, but because of the Acadian deportations, got scattered all over. I have family from Cape Breton, too. My supposed ancestor was Germain Doucet, Sieur de LaVerdure. I also am descended from the Lejeune family, where I have many AmerIndian lines.
          Through DNA testing, many of us of Acadian descent are finding out that we really are Indian. And rainbow, although about 90 percent of American Indians fall under haplogroup Q, it seems that in the Canadian Maritimes, C3 is the more prevelant Y haplogroup.
          This has been a very exciting and interesting journey for me.

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          • #6
            I have a couple of books (buried away somewhere) about the French in NA, from back when I thought I was part French. Anyway, the original mixing of French and Native American DNA, in the Nova Scotia area, was during the reign of Louis the XIV.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
              I have a couple of books (buried away somewhere) about the French in NA, from back when I thought I was part French. Anyway, the original mixing of French and Native American DNA, in the Nova Scotia area, was during the reign of Louis the XIV.
              I thought that the mixing was because they worked with each other in the fur trade. The Dutch were also in the fur trade with various Indian tribes, causing competition and fighting between neighboring tribes in the NY & NJ area. I had an autosomal test that says I am part Native American, 17 percent. My mom also took the test and she has zero percent. There is a teensy bit from the the 1600s on her side. My 17 percent comes from an unknown source on my fathers side. From New Jersey. Off-topic: When I saw a photo of a painting of Louis XIV I thought he looked like my mother. They have the same hair.

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              • #8
                It's generally known that most of the mixing of Europeans and Native American Indians was with the Spanish in most of South and Central America and parts of North America. It is generally known, to me anyway, that most people in the US that claim French ancestry are also part American Indian. I guess in Canada too. Louisiana is famous for having a lot of people who are French-Indian. I think there are pockets or enclaves throughout the US that are also mixed, but are secretive about it.
                Last edited by rainbow; 31 March 2009, 02:43 AM.

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                • #9
                  correction re Louis...

                  Actually, it was Louis the XIII that started the ball rolling with Nouveau France. Louis the XIV got seriously involved with governing it and sending boatloads of French girls to keep the mixed Frenchmen/Indian women offspring from becoming too independent. The mixed bloods grew up speaking "Indian" more than French, and the situation was uncomfortable for France.

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                  • #10
                    correction re New France

                    Actually, New France was officially called La Nouvelle-France. And New Orleans was originally La Nouvelle-Orleans. I'm learning as I go.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rainbow View Post
                      It's generally known that most of the mixing of Europeans and Native American Indians was with the Spanish in most of South and Central America and parts of North America. It is generally known, to me anyway, that most people in the US that claim French ancestry are also part American Indian. I guess in Canada too. Louisiana is famous for having a lot of people who are French-Indian. I think there are pockets or enclaves throughout the US that are also mixed, but are secretive about it.
                      This is true, rainbow. When the French first started coming to Acadia, it was mostly just single men, so they intermarried with the local tribes quite a bit. The French for the most part always had good relations with American Indians, as they realized the Indians could be valuable allies and trade partners. A lot of people I know in Louisiana of French ancestry are part Indian, and in the past it was kept secret, as they were looked down upon. They figured they would be better off socially and economically if they passed themselves off as white.

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                      • #12
                        Hi. I know you are Acadian with y dna C3. C3 is found in North America and Mongolia. Maybe your direct paternal ancestor in Canada really was a Frenchman who had C3 from a fifth century Hun who was in France or from a thirteenth century Mongolian in Europe. I read that the Ghengis Khan line is C3. Just wanted to mention the possible alternative scenario to be aware of. I don't know if there are specific mutations or not that can differentiate between Asian C3 and American C3. I see you have mutation M217 in your signature. Is that exclusively American?
                        Last edited by rainbow; 1 April 2009, 07:24 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rainbow View Post
                          Hi. I know you are Acadian with y dna C3. C3 is found in North America and Mongolia. Maybe your direct paternal ancestor in Canada really was a Frenchman who had C3 from a fifth century Hun who was in France or from a thirteenth century Mongolian in Europe. I read that the Ghengis Khan line is C3. Just wanted to mention the possible alternative scenario to be aware of. I don't know if there are specific mutations or not that can differentiate between Asian C3 and American C3. I see you have mutation M217 in your signature. Is that exclusively American?

                          Rainbow. From what I understand, C3 in itself is not exclusive Native American. However, 13 of my closest matches are Native American. I have several close matches who are C3 who are from Canada, who are Mi'kmaq, and are actually documented relatives. I have seen the presumed results of Ghenghis Khan, and although being C3, they are not that close to me.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ragincajun View Post
                            Rainbow. From what I understand, C3 in itself is not exclusive Native American. However, 13 of my closest matches are Native American. I have several close matches who are C3 who are from Canada, who are Mi'kmaq, and are actually documented relatives. I have seen the presumed results of Ghenghis Khan, and although being C3, they are not that close to me.
                            Hi ragincajun. Thats cool that you have all those matches to a specific tribe that you know your ancestors are from. I wish I
                            had a specific tribe on my fathers side, autosomally. rainbow

                            Elizabeth
                            Last edited by rainbow; 1 April 2009, 08:01 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Perhaps some research on Haplogroup C3 is needed. I still think this is a great story though!!!

                              Here is the Wikipedia page for C3 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_C3_(Y-DNA)

                              You've probably already seen this page.

                              I wouldn't say M217 is exclusively North American... it appears to be placed as a defining marker for C3 and not any subclades..... perhaps a deep clade test?

                              Sorry if I didn't notice the birth year of Germain Doucet, Sieur de LaVerdure but when did you say he was born?

                              To me it would seem more likely that it is Mi'kmaq C3 influence rather then Genghis Khan...... like Niall Noigiallach they don't actually have his Y-DNA.....

                              I have quite a lot of Nova Scotian lines on my paternal side..... a huge chunk from Nova Scotia..... Scots, Irish, Montbeliardais, etc.

                              Good luck in your searches!!!

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