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Adoption Mystery Solved [mostly]

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  • Bob Swinea
    replied
    Hi Scott,
    Good question...did my newly discovered name feel right? It has gotten that way over time. At first it was too strange being raised with one name and then finding the other one. [chuckle] I am now even considering having it tatooed on my other arm with its coat of arms. BTW- I did discover two additional 1/2 sibs but they have chosen not to respond to my queries. So for now I am content knowing what I know. I have found some very helpful cousins who are genealogical researchers too and they are GREAT helps. As I believe I wrote before, at least now I know where I got my ears and chin shape. I am discovering, however, one mystery solved has led me to further mysteries I am attempting to unravel.

    Thanks for the reply. Good luck to you in your own discoveries...
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Jukka
    replied
    Congratulations

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  • scotdna
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Swinea
    Hello,

    I was another of those adopted ones who knew nothing of my own biological heritage. I previously had searched for, found, and reunited with my maternal family. However, they knew nothing about my male lineage. I had done my mtDNA with FTDNA and it was helpful. My wife urged me to go ahead and get my YDNA-37 done. I did and I had no matches at first. Eventually, I scored a 37/37 YDNA match with another FTDNA customer. I knew I had just found the family name of my male parent. A shock to me at age 56

    From this match I was able to investigate every direct male line from our common male ancestor and eliminate every line except one. It turns out that this line produced a young man who lived just down the block from my biological mother when they were both teenagers. An elderly biological Uncle even remembered this young man from his own youth. Obviously my biological mother and the young man knew each other because I am the result. He passed away in the early 1980's, but at least now I know my paternal family name.

    Its the closing of a circle. Bittersweet somewhat but a closure nonetheless. To all the other adopted ones out there I can say "hang in there". Your life could change with the receipt of one email from FTDNA. DNA is amazing stuff!

    Thanks for listening,
    Robert

    Great story Bob.
    I have the same circumstances so I understand how you felt about not knowing your history. My 12-34 test isn't back yet but I'm hoping for similar results... though I have no matches at 12/12.
    Did your Y discovery and new name feel right? I was raised way outside my birth culture and never connected with my adopted family.

    scot

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  • Bob Swinea
    replied
    Originally posted by Pleroma
    Congratulations! This is a great story and another good example of why husbands should always listen to their wives.

    Yes, I agree. I am happy that she insisted BTW- I am Hap K too.

    Bob

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  • Pleroma
    replied
    Congratulations! This is a great story and another good example of why husbands should always listen to their wives.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ellen K
    replied
    certainly wonderful news!

    Congratulations!

    Leave a comment:


  • melissa
    replied
    Thank you, Bob, I enjoyed your story, too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Piobaireachd
    replied
    Outstanding! Thank you!

    Leave a comment:


  • rsychev
    replied
    Wonderful story about behoof of dna-tests, as it strikes me.

    I hope I will found my full matches of my haplotype and it will startup of a new genealogical research, anyway, I wish it to be just so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Victor
    replied
    Thanks for sharing your experience.

    Best Wishes!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Swinea
    started a topic Adoption Mystery Solved [mostly]

    Adoption Mystery Solved [mostly]

    Hello,

    I was another of those adopted ones who knew nothing of my own biological heritage. I previously had searched for, found, and reunited with my maternal family. However, they knew nothing about my male lineage. I had done my mtDNA with FTDNA and it was helpful. My wife urged me to go ahead and get my YDNA-37 done. I did and I had no matches at first. Eventually, I scored a 37/37 YDNA match with another FTDNA customer. I knew I had just found the family name of my male parent. A shock to me at age 56

    From this match I was able to investigate every direct male line from our common male ancestor and eliminate every line except one. It turns out that this line produced a young man who lived just down the block from my biological mother when they were both teenagers. An elderly biological Uncle even remembered this young man from his own youth. Obviously my biological mother and the young man knew each other because I am the result. He passed away in the early 1980's, but at least now I know my paternal family name.

    Its the closing of a circle. Bittersweet somewhat but a closure nonetheless. To all the other adopted ones out there I can say "hang in there". Your life could change with the receipt of one email from FTDNA. DNA is amazing stuff!

    Thanks for listening,
    Robert
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