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DNA and Fibonacci

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  • Beeswax
    replied
    I agree. What I have suggested is a gross over-simplification of what might be at play.

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  • Bill Hurst
    replied
    Beeswax, don't forget that DNA is not permanent. Any base could have been another base in the past, usually, but not always, transitions changing from C to T and possibly back again, or from A to G to A. Several mtDNA positions have changed a couple of times during human history. You can also have insertions and deletions that would affect your list.

    Bill Hurst

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  • Beeswax
    replied
    More Fibonacci Fun

    After sleeping on it, these thoughts came to mind.

    The four bases in the DNA code can be thought of as a quartenary numbering system where A is equivalent to 0, C to 1, G to 2 and T to 3. Then a Fibonacce sequence can be created in DNA language. Here is a short run of a Fibonacce sequence in DNA code:

    Fib DNA
    0 A
    1 C
    1 C
    2 G
    3 T
    5 CC
    8 GA
    13 TC
    21 GAC

    This is just an artifact of my own creation and has no relevance in an actual DNA but since there are 6 billion bases in our DNA, it seems that it could be a template for an actual DNA sequence. If so, it would probably be in the regulatory area, not the coding section and might be the the mechanism for the physical characteristics we see in nature.

    Well, I guess I've satisified my own curiousity about the subject, so 'nough said from me.

    Thanks for your indulgence.

    Leave a comment:


  • B52
    replied
    Originally posted by Beeswax View Post
    I doubt they're trying to figure out if there is something inherit in DNA coding that causes a geometry of the golden ratio, especially with all the exceptions.

    Thanks. Something for me to ponder at night when I can't sleep.
    I would think so...


    I often read this book for grins:

    http://www.amazon.com/Standard-Mathe.../dp/1584882913

    Leave a comment:


  • Beeswax
    replied
    I doubt they're trying to figure out if there is something inherit in DNA coding that causes a geometry of the golden ratio, especially with all the exceptions.

    Thanks. Something for me to ponder at night when I can't sleep.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beeswax
    replied
    Originally posted by Ann Turner View Post
    Not an answer to your question, but perhaps this will strike your fancy. The number of X-line ancestors per generation follows a Fibonacci sequence.

    http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com...mosome-charts/
    Interesting indeed! Thanks for pointing that out.

    Leave a comment:


  • B52
    replied
    try this:

    http://www.maths.surrey.ac.uk/hosted...at.html#golden

    or this documentary on the human face

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0280262/

    I doubt they're trying to figure out if there is something inherit in DNA coding that causes a geometry of the golden ratio, especially with all the exceptions.

    I think it goes something like being taught in art class in grade school that you can learn to draw only using triangles. It's pretty effective method, that is, actually.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ann Turner
    replied
    Not an answer to your question, but perhaps this will strike your fancy. The number of X-line ancestors per generation follows a Fibonacci sequence.

    http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com...mosome-charts/

    Leave a comment:


  • B52
    replied
    LOL, I bet you are sorry.

    Don't worry I've trolled before too...

    Leave a comment:


  • GayeSherman
    replied
    Only a fellow math geek would appreciate this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beeswax
    replied
    Apology

    My post annoyed you. For that I am sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • B52
    replied
    Nothing is so obvious to me. I've never heard of it or attempted to find such a study. It seems bizarre when they already have a complex language they are using to do this.

    Why not adopt PI to describe individual uniqueness and identity with each successive person after 'Adam' assigned the next longer calculated value of PI?

    Yes, my name is .....

    Sir, just tell me how many places your name is calculated too!

    2.

    Jesus!

    Leave a comment:


  • Beeswax
    started a topic DNA and Fibonacci

    DNA and Fibonacci

    Obviously, physical characteristics in all living things are determined by DNA and many of those characteristics can be described by the Fibonacci sequence of numbers. A few examples: the number of petals on flowers, the number of nodes on a plant, the spiral of the nautilas shell and the human ear, the number of fingers we have, etc.

    I wonder if anyone knows of an academic study of how the Fibonacci sequence might be coded in our DNA or is this idea just plain silly?

    Comments solicited.

    Jim Gates
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