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  • DNA USA book

    I finally found a copy of Bryan Sykes' DNA USA: A Genetic Portrait of America. I like what I see so far, especially the multi-colored majority ethnicity map of U.S. counties of the lower 48. By quickly perusing through the index, I noticed that he mentions Finnish-Americans by name but not Americans of French-Canadian descent (at least in the index). France is mentioned though so hopefully, French-Canadians and Acadiens will be discussed.

  • #2
    I am one half Québécois (Paternal) and one half Acadian (Maternal).
    I have a considerable amount of autosomal matches from the southern states, both cajun and creole and from the northern border states.
    I would be interested in knowing if the book mentions more about French Canadians.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Brunetmj View Post
      I am one half Québécois (Paternal) and one half Acadian (Maternal).
      I have a considerable amount of autosomal matches from the southern states, both cajun and creole and from the northern border states.
      I would be interested in knowing if the book mentions more about French Canadians.
      Brunetmj, I am not seeing much on the French genetic contribution to the U.S. at all in the book -- so I was not too happy about that. It would seem to me that thousands of French-speaking people moving from Canada to the U.S. in the 1800s would warrent some mention in the book but I guess not. If I would have known he was going to write such a book, I would have suggested he: (a) become more familiar with French colonial history in North America; (b) examine the possibility for Native American genes existing alongside European genes in French-Americans; (c) compare the genetics of Americans of French-Canadian descent to those of Cajun descent; (d) look into the theory that French Jews immigrated to New France and intermarried with the non-Jewish population and (e) see if French-Canadian genes reflect a Norse heritage in Europe (Normandy, etc.). Perhaps Dr. Sykes is writing another book: DNA Canada.

      If Dr. Sykes writes DNA Canada, the first reference he should read is Chapter 4 of North America: The Historical Geography of a Changing Continent: "France in North America."

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      • #4
        You expressed that thought very eloquently .
        It appears to me you would have the talent to write your own book.

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        • #5
          It appears that the vast majority of states in America are populated by people of German ancestry. Click the link below for a map of ancestry of America.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mo...ted_States.svg

          Here is the main article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maps_of...can_ancestries
          Last edited by girlperson1; 18 June 2012, 02:56 AM. Reason: Add information.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by girlperson1 View Post
            It appears that the vast majority of states in America are populated by people of German ancestry. Click the link below for a map of ancestry of America.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mo...ted_States.svg

            Here is the main article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maps_of...can_ancestries
            Yes, I've seen that too girlperson1. Often they appear in counties one would least expect too. I was surprised to see so many German majorities in the counties of the far western United States.

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            • #7
              A sizable chunk of those German descended people have the surname Schroeder, as I discovered when I bought a book on Schroeder genealogy back in 1980. If I remember they said there were about 1/2 million people in the United States with the surname Schroeder, or variants. The first 10 pages of the book had information on the Schroeder coat of arms, the meaning of the Schroeder name, which was equated to "tailor", but there are other definitions too, that I found later like "carter" like in hauling carts. The remainder of the book was like a phone book with thousands upon thousands of Schroeders in every state.

              Realizing there were so many of us I despaired of ever figuring out our family's genealogy, until the internet and DNA testing came along. In 2009 after a Y-DNA test I discovered I was in haplogroup E, which is relatively rare in northern Germany, at about 2%, and greatly narrowed the field. I even discovered there was a tailor in Bremen, not far from my ancestral village whose surname was Schroeder. Ancestry.com informed me they had info on my Schroeder line, which I discovered was all the way back to 1705 in Ostereistedt, Germany on the direct male line.
              Last edited by Dave123; 18 June 2012, 07:05 AM.

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              • #8
                Something that really impresses me about the book are the chromosome or ancestry paintings provided by 23 and Me. The inclusion of paintings of the individual chromosomes of Dr. Henry Gates (the history professor) was especially an eye-opener. I have seen Dr. Gates on the History Channel.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mixedkid View Post
                  Yes, I've seen that too girlperson1. Often they appear in counties one would least expect too. I was surprised to see so many German majorities in the counties of the far western United States.
                  If that's what's reported on the 2000 US census then obviously German is over reported and English and African under reported.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by B52 View Post
                    If that's what's reported on the 2000 US census then obviously German is over reported and English and African under reported.
                    What makes you think that?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by travers View Post
                      What makes you think that?
                      Certain groups that have been persecuted will change their ethnicity.

                      A lot of folk will report German as a co-ethnicity when it is not giving German a much exaggerated count.

                      Also, people that emigrated from countries that speak a Germanic language will report a German ethnicity. They don't know and why should they after 100, 150 years.

                      A lot of people with Slavic or Keltic names will report German.

                      A very large section of the US reporting their ethnicity as American in the majority is the best indicator though.
                      Last edited by B52; 26 June 2012, 11:24 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Yeah, if I recall, I myself reported "American", simply because I have several European ancestral threads woven into my fabric.

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                        • #13
                          I think Dr. Sykes has done a good job with the book's chapters on Native American and African-American ancestry. Using GEDmatch and reading the book around the same time has really helped to enrich my overall experience with genetic genealogy.

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                          • #14
                            The basic organizational histories of FamilyTreeDNA, 23 and Me and African Ancestry were all covered quite nicely in the book as well. The work of Dr. J. Douglas McDonald so often mentioned in these forums -- especially his connection to the Clan Donald Project, was also discussed several times throughout the book. The author (Dr. Bryan Sykes) has gone far beyond the expected discussion of the basic genetic background of the U.S. He skips over some populatons I would have liked to have seen discussed more fully
                            (such as the French-Canadians or Acadians), but in the end, he is an excellent writer with a wonderful sense of humor and the courage to tell the plain, blunt truth when needed. The myth that every person with a scientific background cannot write in understandable language certainly has been put to rest with this book.
                            Last edited by mixedkid; 1 July 2012, 01:51 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Code:
                              The myth that every person with a scientific background cannot write in understandable language certainly has been put to rest with this book.
                              Amen : Far to often these genetic discussions become far more complex than what they really need to be.

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