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  • A new BGA

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0524112531.htm

  • #2
    On the surface, this seems very similar to what Dr. M and others already do. Can anyone enlighten the rest of us, in plain English, on how this is different?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by vinnie View Post
      On the surface, this seems very similar to what Dr. M and others already do. Can anyone enlighten the rest of us, in plain English, on how this is different?
      All BGA's are BGA's. This BGA purports to conceive of human variation in a spatial or geographical frame. (It might be of considerable interest to a genetic genealogical researcher to learn an ancestor hailed from northeast France rather than France generally). It also purports to sort out admixture in a more direct manner than other methods;

      "In this study, we think of the frequency of variation as being defined by a specific location. This gives us a different way to think about populations, which are usually thought of as being discrete. Instead, we think about the variant frequencies changing in different locations. If you think about a person's ancestry, it is no longer about being from a specific population -- but instead, each person's ancestry is defined by the location they're from. Now ancestry is a continuum."
      ...
      "If the location of an individual is unknown, our model can actually infer geographic origins for each individual using only their genetic data with surprising accuracy," said Wen-Yun Yang, a UCLA computer science graduate student. "The model makes it possible to infer the geographic ancestry of an individual's parents, even if those parents differ in ancestry. Existing approaches falter when it comes to this task"
      Last edited by tomcat; 27 May 2012, 04:57 PM.

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      • #4
        There is a relatively new IT area----geographic information systems (GIS). It can look at old problems in a new way with new methodologies, e.g software programs. It has been applied to a wide variety of issues such as Global Warming and epidemiology. I don't know much more.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by FGSV
          Can Dr. McDonald do a new analisys?
          I can imagine that one of the chip companies, FTDNA, 23&Me or Ancestry, could offer to host this algorithm on their site for the benefit of their customers. Or maybe the authors will get entrepreneurial and set-up a site where their analysis can be had at a price, like DNATribes.

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          • #6
            So far, it hasn't been mentioned on this thread, or in the linked article, that BGA means BioGeographical Ancestry -- to people who already know that, and assume everybody does.

            I'm from Middle Tennessee, and have known for about 65 years that BGA means Battle Ground Academy (a prep school in Franklin, TN). And nor have I sent any data to Dr. McDonald, though I have heard of him. Usually with no reference to the abbreviation or acronym "BGA."

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            • #7
              Are we thinking that we now carry a genetic GPS within us?

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