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Scots Irish ?

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  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    See the oft-quoted book by Fischer titled "Albion's Seed." It has a whole section on "Scotch-Irish." One point in it was that many, or even most, of them came from the border region on both sides of the English and Scotland border; and were already a tough, ornery, feuding breed before they arrived in America. They were a match for hostile Indians and eventually the Red Coats during the Revolutionary War.

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  • B52
    replied
    Scots-Irish is historically a term used to describe the ethnicity of early colonial people in the United States from areas of the United Kingdom other than England.

    It doesn't mean they necessarily were from Ulster at all (and they likely weren't).

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Scots Irish?

    I can readily identify with the desire to reconcile family stories.
    In my case, I believed myself to be Scottish based on my family stories, but at an advanced age, all of my FTDNA Y-DNA matches are
    Irish and primarily associated with the Maguire Clan of Fermanagh.

    This is true both at all levels of STR testing from 25 markers thru
    111 markers and confirmed by deep subclade testing. Among the Maguire
    Surname group, we also have a Buchanan and a Johnston. Fred Johnston's great grandfather died in southern Scotland and he searched
    vainly among the two Scottish clans Johnston. His DNA is also Maguire.

    William Buchanan has a book in which a McCauley (Maguire) of Ardincaple, Scotland, bequeathed an estate in Fermanagh in 1595, to
    William Buchanan "of me ain' blud". There is also a McNeill of Barra
    who has Maguire DNA, but then, the McNeills are descended from McNeils
    in Co. Fermangh. I have also read all of the previous posts to this
    thread and found nothing that I don't agee with.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
    Well, forget that one. She was born too early, and married someone else not in my tree. I sure wish an expert would come to my rescue.
    Now I'm back to Baker as her (earliest known female ancestress) last name. I was at this point months or years ago.

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  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
    Well, I did it again. I jumped to a new tree for my maternal line. This one has a lot of Charitys sprinkled over the generations. So I don't have to claim her name was an alias. It's probably also erroneous, since I do have Hatfield surnames with a few FF matches. The problem with this tree (Charity Wade and on back to tidewater Virginia) is that it points to a French Huguenot origin (via England first). Hmm... But they do seem to mix it up with Anglos.
    Well, forget that one. She was born too early, and married someone else not in my tree. I sure wish an expert would come to my rescue.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Well, I did it again. I jumped to a new tree for my maternal line. This one has a lot of Charitys sprinkled over the generations. So I don't have to claim her name was an alias. It's probably also erroneous, since I do have Hatfield surnames with a few FF matches. The problem with this tree (Charity Wade and on back to tidewater Virginia) is that it points to a French Huguenot origin (via England first). Hmm... But they do seem to mix it up with Anglos.

    Leave a comment:


  • ragnar
    replied
    One of my dna cousins here has Hatfield & McCoy on his surname list. I haven't asked him if they are... you know.

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  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Let's go back to the Hatfields and McCoys. Lately I've been probing around in the Powell trees, since it looks suspiciously matching with names and dates (looking for my maternal ancestors). And today I stumbled onto an Archibald McCoy 1732-1810. Hmm... But I haven't seen McCoy in FF matches that show their connected names.

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  • andbro
    replied
    Blood of the Isles by Bryan Sykes, explains the way that the Irish and scots are one and the same. Unles you are talking about people from the Hebrides.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
    In that Hatfield and McCoy program (I'm sure it will be repeated on the History Channel in the future), there was a friend of the main Hatfield character who was called "Wall". At one point his whole name was given, and "Wall" was his middle name. What we're seeing here is his mother's surname. I have Wall connected to my maternal tree, although at this point not in a direct line. But I still don't know the surname of my earliest known female ancestress in NC. So the jury is still out on how close the Wall lineage is to mine.
    Let me entertain you all a bit more with this line of thought. A Wall was owner/operator of the strategic ferry across the Pee Dee River between Anson County and the town of Rockingham in Richmond County, NC. My Jacob Falconbury used that ferry. Now what were to happen if said Wall had a daughter about the right age? Hmm...? (That probably didn't happen that way, but could have).

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
    And then there were the Hatfields and the McCoys. I watched that 3-part series on the History Channel. I read somewhere that it was a transferring of feuds from the border region between Scotland and England; the Hatfields on the English side, and the McCoys on the Scotland side. I noticed three people in my Family Finder matches have a connection to one of them, but I'm not telling which one.
    In that Hatfield and McCoy program (I'm sure it will be repeated on the History Channel in the future), there was a friend of the main Hatfield character who was called "Wall". At one point his whole name was given, and "Wall" was his middle name. What we're seeing here is his mother's surname. I have Wall connected to my maternal tree, although at this point not in a direct line. But I still don't know the surname of my earliest known female ancestress in NC. So the jury is still out on how close the Wall lineage is to mine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brunetmj
    replied
    Another explanation of why a Scottish person may show up as genetically Irish...would be.. that many of them actually "Are" genetically Irish..
    Well that explanation makes the most sense to me.
    This was French Canada in 1847 ( or so).He is an orphan with two younger sisters who were given to a Scot family to be raised. He is adopted by a French couple but keeps his given name . Later in life he begins using a French version . Laurence Moore to Laurent Maure.
    He dies young ( 52) a crime victim in Quebec .
    His bilingual daughter , my grandmother , claims Scottish in a border crossing
    record . The bulk of non French matches on family finder and relative finder are Irish.

    Leave a comment:


  • JD Edwards
    replied
    Another explanation of why a Scottish person may show up as genetically Irish...would be.. that many of them actually "Are" genetically Irish..as the the Kingdom of Scotland owes its origins/creation to the Irish Gaels(aka Scoti) that left Ulster and invaded Pictish lands in what is now Scotland starting around the 5th century..

    Leave a comment:


  • GayeSherman
    replied
    My MIL's side includes Scots-Irish (Johnston) but they arrived in Western PA between 1837 and 1841. Parents born in Ireland (ca. 1800), eldest son born in Scotland (1826), next three kids born in Ireland (1829, 1831, 1835), then Scotland (1837) and the youngest born in PA in 1841.

    A few decades later the whole clan picks up and moves to Coshocton, OH.

    I really need to do some research on what would have prompted those moves.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    And then there were the Hatfields and the McCoys. I watched that 3-part series on the History Channel. I read somewhere that it was a transferring of feuds from the border region between Scotland and England; the Hatfields on the English side, and the McCoys on the Scotland side. I noticed three people in my Family Finder matches have a connection to one of them, but I'm not telling which one.

    Leave a comment:

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