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  • G Haplogroup of Newbie

    I just received my Haplogroup of G. I think I'M still in shock need a cold cloth and information. My family orginiates from Cornwall, England and how the heck did a G Haploroup get mixed in with all this R1b people. Need some help sorting out the old bones dna mixture.
    Thanks for any type of clarification you might offer.
    Doug Gill

  • #2
    Bear in mind you are descended from, maybe, hundreds of thousands of people. Your Y and mt dna are inherited from just two of these individuals.

    These lines go back to a time long before there was an England and reflect whatever admixtures were happening during those times.

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    • #3
      Doug,

      I know nothing about haplogroup G, however, I do have a database on Cornwall, UK. Cornwall, being a mining and seafaring country now has a diversity of haplogroups, I, R1a, Q, with R1b at 70%. May I add you, our first G cousin to the database?

      Cornwall Y-DNA Project;
      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb..../cornwall.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Whenever a person gets a susprise estimated haplogroup. it is usually a wise idea to do the SNP upgrade to make sure the y-str estimate is right.

        I think that the modern G haplogroup is found in South Asian -Pakistan & India. The so-called "gypsy" population would be a possible source of this y-DNA in western Europe.

        Timothy Peterman

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        • #5
          As I typed the previous message, I knew there was a less offensive term than "gypsy" to describe this ethnic group, but I had to go outside of the website to find it & didn't want to lose the message I had written. The correct term is "Roma".

          Timothy Peterman

          Comment


          • #6
            Cornish cousins

            Originally posted by wwgeorge
            Doug,

            I know nothing about haplogroup G, however, I do have a database on Cornwall, UK. Cornwall, being a mining and seafaring country now has a diversity of haplogroups, I, R1a, Q, with R1b at 70%. May I add you, our first G cousin to the database?

            Cornwall Y-DNA Project;
            http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb..../cornwall.html


            Please do post my dna marking with the Cornish cousins. My branch hails from St. Agnes.

            Comment


            • #7
              Roma

              Originally posted by T E Peterman
              Whenever a person gets a susprise estimated haplogroup. it is usually a wise idea to do the SNP upgrade to make sure the y-str estimate is right.

              I think that the modern G haplogroup is found in South Asian -Pakistan & India. The so-called "gypsy" population would be a possible source of this y-DNA in western Europe.

              Timothy Peterman

              Thanks Tim for your comments, no offense at being a Gypsy, but much prefer the I group of Vikings. Both are wanderers but I think the Vikes had more fun.

              Comment


              • #8
                Y Dna

                Originally posted by bob_allison
                Bear in mind you are descended from, maybe, hundreds of thousands of people. Your Y and mt dna are inherited from just two of these individuals.

                These lines go back to a time long before there was an England and reflect whatever admixtures were happening during those times.

                Thanks Bob for your reply. Thousands of people make up my DNA chain however that non-recombinant Y DNA just keeps moving along. It is my only claim to fame for bragging rights. Just not that many G guys around to share our story with much prefer the Rb1 group of neolithic tough guys who are real surviors.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by douggill
                  It is my only claim to fame for bragging rights. Just not that many G guys around to share our story with much prefer the Rb1 group of neolithic tough guys who are real surviors.
                  This R1b is happy to listen to your G story!

                  Bob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by douggill
                    Thanks Bob for your reply. Thousands of people make up my DNA chain however that non-recombinant Y DNA just keeps moving along. It is my only claim to fame for bragging rights. Just not that many G guys around to share our story with much prefer the Rb1 group of neolithic tough guys who are real surviors.
                    Cheer up, Doug. We all are real survivors.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great to actually see a bit of discussion of G on this board - quite a rarity! Though our SNP test results have yet to come in, most of the members of our Boyett(e) DNA Project (including myself) have been predicted G2 (in fact our Project has the largest number of G2) members that I've come across). Here are a few links with info about G/G2:

                      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....il/haplo_g.htm
                      http://home.comcast.net/%7ewhitathey/indexg.htm
                      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb..../hg/YCC_G.html
                      http://www.brian-hamman.com/ModalsForG.htm

                      From some of the above referenced info, you'll see that though G is rare, it occurs at low levels thourghout Europe, including the UK (1-4%) There are higher levels in Italy, Eastern Spain (Calalonia), and up thropugh the Rhine region of France and Germany. The only place where G is common is in the Caucusus region, especially the Republic of Georgia. G could have entered the UK during any of the invasions that populated that country, as all of those groups would have had a least some G (though the Romans and Norman French would likely have had more). I actually like being part of a much smaller haplogroup, as it certainly makes things easier in determing whether you are related (for example, our G2 members have matches only with each other - no list of 200 unrelated surname matches here!). And the origins of the haplogroup itself have a bit of the air of mystery about them.

                      In addition there is a webring for those interested in G/G2, if you'd like I can pass laong info on how to joiin it. And if you haven't done so already, do upload your results to ysearch as each new G haplotype can contribubute to better understand the origins of G. And by the way, it's not haplogroup G that's common among the Roma (as well as in India and Pakistan), that's haplogroup H. It's Ossetians from southern Russia (70%) and Georgians (30%) that have the highest percentage of G.

                      Regards,
                      Garland
                      Administrator, The Boyett(e) DNA Project
                      http://www.familytreedna.com/public/boyette/
                      http://bellsouthpwp.net/B/o/Boyt-Boyett/Page.mht
                      Last edited by ; 13 June 2005, 07:27 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks GMan

                        Thanks G-Man:

                        Great help in the information you sent. I mean that even as I swim around in all the charts trying to locate a perfect match. I agree G2 is probably what my snp test will show. Now I don't feel so isolated in the G Group. You know being a minority is not all that it's cracked up to be. I would love to join the G group ring. All support groups are a welcome addition from listening to those Neolithic people brag about how clean they keep their caves.

                        I have uploaded my Y information and also found a web page of Cornish cousins that I asked to post my G2 Haplogroup. I think we may locate some more intruders into that R1b sanctuary in Cornwall.

                        Take Care
                        Doug Gill
                        [email protected]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "And by the way, it's not haplogroup G that's common among the Roma (as well as in India and Pakistan), that's haplogroup H. It's Ossetians from southern Russia (70%) and Georgians (30%) that have the highest percentage of G."

                          Thanks for clarifying this. I was reading somewhere of a theory that King Arthur (as well as presumably others) may have come from near the Black Sea. The theory was that he was Armenian & came into Britain along with the Romans. Perhaps the Romans persuaded (voluntarily or involuntarily) a lot of men from the eastern Black Sea area (Georgia?) to move to Britain.

                          Timothy Peterman

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Doug,

                            I'm glad that you found the info on G useful. I certainly do understand feeling a bit lost when getting assigned to a rarer haplogroup such as G, when so much of the discussion on the genetic genalogy boards is focused on R1b (and to a lesser degree, I, and J2; even E3b gets quite a bit more discussion). And yes, some of those in the more common haplogroups tend to give the impression that the cave dwellers from paleothehic are solely responsible for life on the continent. But one should keep in mind that some of the more recent haplogroups to move into the continent (and by recent I mean in the past 9,000 years or less) are responsible for some of the mare salient features of European life.

                            We all know about the spread of agriculture, but many forget that speakers of Indo-European languages (the proginator of latin, greek, english, german, french, etc. and most modern European languages) moved into the continent only in the past 6,000 years of so, whlie languages associated with the descendants of the cave dwellers (such as Basque, whose speakers are almost completely R1b) have largely died out. In fact, a growing number believe in a link between the spread of Indo-Euoropean languages, and the movement of R1a and G into western and soutnern Europe. Both R1a and G are strongly represented in the Black Sea area, the area to the northeast of which is believed to have been the home of the orginal Indo-European speakers. It appears as if R1a took a more northern route, while G a more southern into the continental heartland.

                            It's interesting to note that the Ossetians (also known as Alans) who have the highest level of G speak an Indo-European language. They appear to play a key role in the spread of G to the west, and some see evidence of this as far away as Spain - the name "Catalonia" may be linked to "Goth-Alania", and it's interesting that Catalans still have higher levels of G than average (8%). So, though small in number, G most likely helped give Europe something quite important - its voice! Timothy's point concerning possible English link to the Black Sea area is quite interesting, and we know that the Romans included many from this area. But as pointed out earlier, G has been around in Europe for thousands of years, so it could have arrived in the British Isles in countless ways. And as promised, I'll pass along contact info for the "G2-Clan" web group.

                            Regards,
                            Garland
                            Administrator, The Boyett(e) DNA Project
                            http://www.familytreedna.com/public/boyette/
                            http://bellsouthpwp.net/B/o/Boyt-Boyett/Page.mht

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