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  • thetick
    replied
    Originally posted by 507 View Post
    The last thing a British man wants to do is find out he really and truely is blood related to an American.
    I would have thought it would have been an Irish man not an American.

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  • 507
    replied
    The last thing a British man wants to do is find out he really and truely is blood related to an American.

    Leave a comment:


  • efgen
    replied
    Originally posted by econnore View Post
    What he said next surprised me..."It isn't anything we do here in the UK, going to the trouble or expense, except for legal reasons."
    Perhaps you should point out to him that the "Who Do You Think You Are? Live" conference in the UK actively promotes genetic genealogy, with Family Tree DNA sponsoring the DNA workshops

    http://www.whodoyouthinkyouarelive.com/about-show/dna

    Elise

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  • Javelin
    replied
    Incidentally for those with Isles ancestry, I find Genesreunited has been at last as useful as or more useful than Ancestry for making contact with distant relatives.

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  • royfarnol
    replied
    Methinks lower prices would help a lot.

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  • briancowings
    replied
    This is an interesting thread. Hopefully ancestry.com and .co.uk will be pushing the DNA side of genealogy with their new autosomal testing.
    If they can get it right the UK may become more interested!

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  • econnore
    replied
    Good points, Gaye. I've been thinking that perhaps this cousin thinks there's pain and/or blood drawing involved.

    If he really does know most of his relatives and lives in the same area as they were born, he might think testing is pointless.

    Then again, he's gone to the trouble to build a complex family tree on ancestry.com, and he was unaware of my relative whose records fill in his tree quite nicely.

    Because my background is from four different countries, I have my reasons for trying to pinpoint how I might be related to this chap. Also, he is a generation older than me, which is helpful.

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  • GayeSherman
    replied
    There's also the issue of many people still not understanding what modern DNA testing is all about. Being adopted, I often get these total question mark looks whenever I mention DNA testing. "How can you do a DNA test when you don't know who your relatives are?"

    That and...

    1. If I get my blood drawn for some medical reason, does my DNA get put into this database without my permission?

    2. I wouldn't do it because then my insurance company might get a hold of it and cancel my policy or charge me more.

    3. Are criminals included in this database? Police/FBI take their DNA samples all the time.

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  • razyn
    replied
    A lot of the testing that's actually been carried out in the Isles (as distinguished from the populations of present or former British colonies, with ancestry at least partially from there) has only looked at ten or twelve markers. And a lot of it has heavy duty privacy fences around it. It's nearly impossible to deduce whether one's 67 or 111 marker results from FTDNA match, for example, some tested but unnamed person in a study of 4000 blood samples taken throughout the UK, that was only looking for very broad brush genetic comparison of the population of about eight regions having distinctive settlement history.

    One encouraging sign is a growing interest within local history and genealogy groups (that one can hit upon, with web browsers) in questions about where their emigrants went, and whether they have cousins in Nashville or Boston, Toronto or Vancouver, Sydney or Perth... that sort of thing. It's really getting a lot easier, lately, to find somebody willing to test. (Maybe not yet so very easy to negotiate the logistical and financial details.)

    The odds against finding a genetic match with the same surname, after three or four centuries, with potential NPE events in the generations leading to both ends of such migration, become pretty high. Best bet may be the surname project approach, in which a pool of interested parties share the cost, and maybe somebody wins.

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  • thetick
    replied
    Apparently he does know not too many people interested in DNA. The UK is by far the most tested European country. The people from the Isle are by far talked about as being heavily test, though some of that is the high percentage of Americans with Isle history.

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  • econnore
    started a topic UK perspective

    UK perspective

    On ancestry.com I was contacted by a British fellow whose great great grandmother is my great great great grand aunt. I told him that I'd had my DNA tested and asked whether he had done so. Thinking that he probably had not been tested, I was gearing up to offer to pay.

    What he said next surprised me..."It isn't anything we do here in the UK, going to the trouble or expense, except for legal reasons."

    This fellow's father is my third cousin, twice removed.
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