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  • Picture worth a thousand words?

    A picture would sure help figure out what kind of DNA test would help find a particular ancestor. A color coded pedigree chart would be so helpful (one color showing ancestors that might be found by y-DNA, another color showing Family Finder, etc.) Has anybody seen anything like that?

    For instance, I have a not well-established connection on my mother's side: my mother's mother's father's father. Is there a test that would be most helpful in confirming that line? If so, what other living relatives would I try to convince to test? A nice graphic of this would be very informative.

  • #2
    Are you asking a direct question about your great grandmothers father or are you looking for a color coded chart and want to use that as an example.
    Having done this for a year or so I no longer find it that complicated.
    Y test for males and male lines, mtDNA for female lines and Family Finder for relatives on both sides. It gets more complicated when comparing lines with other lines and trying to determine a relationship with a family Finder match.
    To do a Y test in your example you would need to test a male descendant of your great grandmothers father . If you are male this won't help you because it is your female line father . A mtdna test only gives a female line. A family Finder test to look for cousins that may have more information. This means a family tree , paper trail has to be developed.

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    • #3
      The specific case was intended as an example but thank you for that answer. The general graphic is what I'm really looking for. I'm a newbie at this. I got the yDNA 37 and so far I'm disappointed not to have discovered any confirmed connections on my Dad's side. If I were to invest additional $ to try to fill gaps on my Mom's side, I really want to make sure I don't waste money on tests that have no ability to address the specific holes in my tree.

      Sounds like Family Finder would be the most appropriate, but I don't have a good concept of what parts of my pedigree tree it would most likely help with. I was hoping to find a chart that might clue me in!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bgmiller View Post
        I was hoping to find a chart that might clue me in!
        In the new MyFTDNA there's a nice chart on the main page for each of the tests. I think these links work but you just click on the button in the dark navy blue bar at the top for Y-DNA, mtDNA, and Family Finder:

        Y-DNA:
        https://my.familytreedna.com/y-dna-h...2boonjY1dbA%3d
        mt-DNA:
        https://my.familytreedna.com/mtDNA-h...2boonjY1dbA%3d
        FF:
        https://my.familytreedna.com/family-...2boonjY1dbA%3d

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bgmiller View Post
          The specific case was intended as an example but thank you for that answer. The general graphic is what I'm really looking for. I'm a newbie at this. I got the yDNA 37 and so far I'm disappointed not to have discovered any confirmed connections on my Dad's side. If I were to invest additional $ to try to fill gaps on my Mom's side, I really want to make sure I don't waste money on tests that have no ability to address the specific holes in my tree.

          Sounds like Family Finder would be the most appropriate, but I don't have a good concept of what parts of my pedigree tree it would most likely help with. I was hoping to find a chart that might clue me in!
          Just remember Y-DNA is the very outside, male-only line on the pedigree chart; only one person each generation as far back as you go. Similarly, mtDNA is the opposite outside, female-only line of the pedigree chart; also only one person each generation. On the other hand, FF is everybody on the pedigree chart; all the lines. However, the statistics work out so you might not have inherited any DNA from some ancestors after 5-6 generations, but your siblings might have.

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          • #6
            Chart

            Look at http://www.familytreedna.com/inheritance-chart.aspx

            The outer left hand side (blue) is for Y-DNA, the outer right hand side (pink) is for mtDNA and everyone is for Family Finder.

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            • #7
              Thank you all for your responses!

              This one is exactly what I had in mind: http://www.familytreedna.com/inheritance-chart.asp

              So then, unless there is a relationship that is directly paternal (blue side) or directly maternal (pink side) , FF sounds like the only reasonable test.

              For the Y-DNA 37 test I already had done, am I correct that I will only match people who have a direct paternal line to someone on my direct paternal line?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bgmiller View Post
                For the Y-DNA 37 test I already had done, am I correct that I will only match people who have a direct paternal line to someone on my direct paternal line?
                Yes.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bgmiller View Post
                  For the Y-DNA 37 test I already had done, am I correct that I will only match people who have a direct paternal line to someone on my direct paternal line?
                  Depending upon how rare your 37 marker Haplotype is you may match with others who are do not share a common paternal ancestor with you. This is one reason FTDNA offers additional markers. Even an exact match at 111 markers does not prove a connection. It just helps narrow the field. At the same time a minor mismatch at 37 markers does not rule out a possible connection.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
                    Depending upon how rare your 37 marker Haplotype is you may match with others who are do not share a common paternal ancestor with you.
                    Jim, this statement puzzles me. Surely it is only literally true if you add the words "in genealogical time" - no?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
                      Even an exact match at 111 markers does not prove a connection. It just helps narrow the field. At the same time a minor mismatch at 37 markers does not rule out a possible connection.
                      See FAQ 4 http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=8#511

                      Okay, so "confidently affirm" and "prove" are technically different, but an exact 111 match is about as close to proving as one can get, at least at this time.

                      The problem with matches below 37 markers is that in many haplogroups it's still possible for the haplotypes to be in different subclades. Once 37 markers (or above) have been tested, then the degree to which two matching haplotypes belong to different subclades drastically reduces, at least for most haplogroups; R1b might be an exception. (Any R1b excperts out there?) If two haplotypes belong to two different subclades even within the same haplogroup, they can still be separated by thousands of years. The only way to know positively that two haplotypes belong to the same subclade is to have the deep clade tests done.

                      The flip side is that two haplotypes belonging to the same subclade might not match until the 37 marker level, as in the case of two of my cousins who are a gd=4 at 67.

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                      • #12
                        My cousin's predicted haplogroup is R1b1a2. At 67 markers he has two matches, one with a GD of 1, one with a GD of 2 Both matches are R1b1a2a1a1b3c, with a terminal SNP of L2. My cousin has a one step mutation at DYS 449 that no one else in his lineage group in his surname project has.

                        Can I assume that my cousin belongs to the same subclade?

                        Carol Anne

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                        • #13
                          With odds like that I would all-in if I was betting. Yes 66/67. I think that's a certainly as far as being the same haplogroup.

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