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  • What exactly will I learn?

    Im thinking of actually doing both tests Paternal and Maternal as my mother was adopted.
    In my fathers case, I know his family originated in the mists of the Austro-Hungarian empire in the areas known today as Poland and Hungary. My father had blue eyes as did his brothers, but not his sister, she had brown eyes. Im not sure if my Grandfather and Grandmother had both blue eyes or one or the other did and the blue was dominant somehow in so many of the children.
    Assuming that I pay for the maximum amount of markers, how much more really can DNA tell me about my family on my fathers side? If it told me that he had markers that showed origination in Austria which may acccount for the blue eyed, predominance, then that would be a duhhhh kind of factoid. How many centuries past can the markers depict in terms of possible origins, migration etc. To come back and find something Slavic about him would not be a big revelation either as you know that the Austro-Hungarian empire was a smorgasboard of nationalities.
    So what could this test tell me that I could never likely postulate on my own or trace back via records even if they survived WW2

    I thank you for your time and appreciate any feedback you may be able to provide as to my interests in your service and the possibilities it may offer.

    IAB

  • #2
    Hi IAB

    If you're looking for recent origins, in terms of the last 200 years or so, you might want to look at the family finder test, rather than the y-chromosome or mtDNA tests.

    FF will help you find possible matches with folks that share some ancestry up to about 6 generations back. The possible bit is because you've got to hope that other people who are related to you have also done the testing and are interested in connecting up to you.

    The y-chromosome test might be also helpful in finding some things about your father's long-term ancestry, if there are other male-lines that have also done the testing, but it starts to be more useful further back.

    All of the tests are most useful in connection with a paper trail, so you might also want to see what you can find out by more traditional (as much as the internet and computerised databases could be said to be traditional ) methods as well.

    hope that helps

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    • #3
      Y-DNA and mtDNA testing is for deep ancestry. For example, on my Google Map, the yellow markers are my type. http://tinyurl.com/nsww44
      My direct paternal ancestors were from northern Slovakia. But Y-DNA shows my line was previously from southern Poland, and ultimately, from the Caucasus. Interesting, but not useful for genealogical purposes.

      Regards,
      Jim

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by IAB View Post
        Im thinking of actually doing both tests Paternal and Maternal as my mother was adopted.
        In my fathers case, I know his family originated in the mists of the Austro-Hungarian empire in the areas known today as Poland and Hungary.
        ...
        So what could this test tell me that I could never likely postulate on my own or trace back via records even if they survived WW2
        - To learn about your mother's ancestry, the best test would be Family Finder for her, if she is alive. If not, then Family Finder for you would still be helpful, though less so because your DNA is roughly a 50-50 mix of your parents'. In either case, Family Finder can reliably detect relationships only back 5 generations (e.g., between 3rd cousins).

        - An mtDNA test for you or your mother (which would give the same result) is frankly unlikely to give much useful information unless you happen to find an exact full-sequence match with a highly identifiable group of people (e.g., Ashkenazi Jews). Otherwise, even a full-sequence exact match may well indicate merely a common ancestor within the last 2000 years.

        - A Y-DNA test can be genealogically useful if you find very close, high-resolution (67-marker) matches. You can then attempt to connect family trees. Otherwise, your Y-DNA results indicate patrilineal ancestry (from, say, 500 years ago or more); but your post suggests that you are not particularly interested in this (e.g., whether your patrilineage is Slavic, Celtic, or Germanic).

        Comment


        • #5
          To add to what others have said, these tests (Y chromosome, family finder) work if a relative has tested and so you cannot connect. that is, if you find somebody that has your own Y markers, then you know that you have the same paternal ancestor within a couple hundred years (say). Of course, whether there is a relative who has tested is quite random.

          These tests will not be able, per se, to tell you from which country your ancestry originates, less so split the components from different countries. Not just because the habsburg empire was a smorgasbord, but because european nationalities are genetically quite close. You can distinguish, say, east asian versus european, but not within europe.

          cacio

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by IAB View Post
            Im thinking of actually doing both tests Paternal and Maternal as my mother was adopted.
            In my fathers case, I know his family originated in the mists of the Austro-Hungarian empire in the areas known today as Poland and Hungary. My father had blue eyes as did his brothers, but not his sister, she had brown eyes. Im not sure if my Grandfather and Grandmother had both blue eyes or one or the other did and the blue was dominant somehow in so many of the children.
            Assuming that I pay for the maximum amount of markers, how much more really can DNA tell me about my family on my fathers side? If it told me that he had markers that showed origination in Austria which may acccount for the blue eyed, predominance, then that would be a duhhhh kind of factoid. How many centuries past can the markers depict in terms of possible origins, migration etc. To come back and find something Slavic about him would not be a big revelation either as you know that the Austro-Hungarian empire was a smorgasboard of nationalities.
            So what could this test tell me that I could never likely postulate on my own or trace back via records even if they survived WW2

            I thank you for your time and appreciate any feedback you may be able to provide as to my interests in your service and the possibilities it may offer.

            IAB
            If your mother is living and she wants to search for her birth family, I would be happy to point you or her in the right direction regarding the resources out there (free) that are helpful. There is also a group you or your mom can join called [email protected]. In addition, there are several large searchable adoptee/birth family registries where you can search to see if any birth family is searching for your mom. I see people who are anywhere between their 20's, and 80's searching so it is never too late, and you are never too old to try and learn more about where you came from.

            Judy

            Comment


            • #7
              IAB,
              There is a huge amount you can learn. Just learning about the technology of genetic genealogy itself can be extremely interesting. What you learn about your particular genetic lineages is to some extent a matter of luck. If you are lucky your DNA will be very unique and thus you will be able to clearly identify other people who share your DNA. When you find such matches it still gets down to sharing data so, as aeduna pointed out, it is very important to have reliable traditional genealogy data to complement the DNA data.

              Comment


              • #8
                ? regarding testing and DNA storing.

                First, thank you to all who responded with their time, knowledge and encouragement.

                Now, it says in the FAQ that our DNA would be stored and that we could upgrade the test. Does this mean that if I start at the minimum test markers, I could later pay for an increase in marker testing without having to buy another kit and swab again?

                Also can a maternal test be performed from the DNA you already have tested for paternal markers or would that need a new scrapping altogether.

                Thanks Again for all your patience and help.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by IAB View Post
                  Now, it says in the FAQ that our DNA would be stored and that we could upgrade the test. Does this mean that if I start at the minimum test markers, I could later pay for an increase in marker testing without having to buy another kit and swab again?
                  Yes.

                  Originally posted by IAB View Post
                  Also can a maternal test be performed from the DNA you already have tested for paternal markers or would that need a new scrapping altogether.
                  Yes, you can order multiple tests from the same kit. I started with 37 marker Y-DNA, HVR1+HVR2 mtDNA, and Family Finder (FF). Recently, I upgraded to 67 markers Y-DNA and FGS mtDNA, which didn't require any new samples. I just ordered a few Y-SNPs, so hopefully there's still enough for that.

                  Sometimes, for one reason or another, there isn't enough DNA left for another test. In that case, they'll send out a new kit for another swab. If your concern is for testing older relatives who might not be with us for much longer, call FTDNA. They used to send three vials with every kit, now they only send two. They may make an exception if you ask.

                  Comment

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