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  • No exact matches??

    I have no exact matches, even at the 12 or 25 marker levels. The closest I get is a GD of 1. None of my matches have my surname but to be honest I am only a little surprised by that. I am waiting on the upgrade from 37 to 67 markes to see if maybe I can find one of the folks at the lower level whom we may have a bit more "in common" with. Several names appear at multiple levels, but again, no one matches exactly.

    Any suggestions on where to go from here?

    Melinda

  • #2
    Welcome to the club.

    There are a few similar postings throughout these threads. I too am one of those without many exact matches.

    The short of it is that you have to wait. The long of it is that you can broaden your testing to include deep clade and family finder. Family Finder, as far as I understand it, will broaden your match possibilities not in terms of strs, but of a more diversified method.

    This field is trying to evolve and it takes patience, which understandably, wears thin. I am certain that others will weigh in with far better answers than I.

    Good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      I have been wondering where to go from here and thinking about the deep clade. Can anyone explain the deep clade to me?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by macmom6 View Post
        I have no exact matches, even at the 12 or 25 marker levels. The closest I get is a GD of 1. None of my matches have my surname but to be honest I am only a little surprised by that. I am waiting on the upgrade from 37 to 67 markes to see if maybe I can find one of the folks at the lower level whom we may have a bit more "in common" with. Several names appear at multiple levels, but again, no one matches exactly.

        Any suggestions on where to go from here?

        Melinda

        For males (females cannot do YDNA testing), YDNA-37 marker and 67 marker will potentially show matches with slightly more recent common ancestors shared (6-9 generations or so), compared to the YDNA-12 marker test, where the most recent common ancestor could be 1000 years back. It is interesting that you do not see any 12 marker exact matches as most people do have at least a few at that level. Is your ethnic background more unique and therefore not well represented in the FTDNA database? Anyway, if you are looking for the most recent relative matches, the Family Finder test is best and can be done by both males and females. The matches you get there will be from both your mother and fathers genealogical lines and can include very close (e.g., sibling, 1/2 sibling, aunt, uncle, 1st, 2nd, 3rd....cousins), out to to 5th-distant cousin matches, if people genetically related to you have also tested.

        It really depends on what exactly you are trying to find out about your ancestry. In my opinion, spending money on a deep clade test right now might be a waste of money unless you do the YDNA-37 marker test and have some exact or close matches. Even then I would probably try YDNA-67 after the YDNA-37 IF you have the matches, before doing the deep clade one. If you are trying to find more recent relative connections, and especially if you are an adoptee, I would definitely recommend the Family Finder test.

        Judy

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by macmom6 View Post
          I have been wondering where to go from here and thinking about the deep clade. Can anyone explain the deep clade to me?
          Hello, that all depends on what you are looking for. Did the 12 marker test identify a predicted haplogroup? If so, then you might look to see how common that haplogroup is. If it is not very common, that could explain the lack of matches even at the 12 marker level. I belong to a relatively uncommon haplogroup and only have about 15 matches while some folks have stated they have as many as several hundred. Deep clade tests are useful, but they won't really increase your number of matches only confirm your predicted haplogroup. If it were me, I would probably upgrade to more y-dna STR markers -- the 25 or 37 panel. The deep clade test looks at single mutations that are common to certain haplogroups in order to confirm what has been predicted by analyzing your 12 y-dna markers. The only reason I could see for doing that test and having only 12 markers, is if they weren't able to identify a likely haplogroup based on the 12 marker test.
          Last edited by ekc123; 24 July 2011, 03:46 PM.

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          • #6
            I started with the 37 marker test with my father as the donor and am currently waiting on the results of the upgrade to 67.

            As for ethnic background, we always thought we were white, with possibly some american indian thrown in. My great grandfather's father is unknown. His mother took the information, very well hidden too I might add, to her grave with her. Until recently we didn't even have a name. I found the name of a spouse listed on her death certificate but do not know who supplied the information or where they may have gotten it.

            The purpose of the testing was to see if we could find a direction to go in and then build a paper trail for that side of the family and perhaps even confirm or rule out totally the family rumor that there is indian blood in our veins.

            Our predicted Halpogroup is B, M181, M60, P85 and P90 presumed positive. I hope that means something to you all because I am clueless. I understand that it means that hundreds of years ago, probably thousands, my uber greatgrandfather walked out of sub saharan Africa and started the journey that led to me being here and that B is the second oldest Halpogroup.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by macmom6 View Post
              I started with the 37 marker test with my father as the donor and am currently waiting on the results of the upgrade to 67.

              As for ethnic background, we always thought we were white, with possibly some american indian thrown in. My great grandfather's father is unknown. His mother took the information, very well hidden too I might add, to her grave with her. Until recently we didn't even have a name. I found the name of a spouse listed on her death certificate but do not know who supplied the information or where they may have gotten it.

              The purpose of the testing was to see if we could find a direction to go in and then build a paper trail for that side of the family and perhaps even confirm or rule out totally the family rumor that there is indian blood in our veins.

              Our predicted Halpogroup is B, M181, M60, P85 and P90 presumed positive. I hope that means something to you all because I am clueless. I understand that it means that hundreds of years ago, probably thousands, my uber greatgrandfather walked out of sub saharan Africa and started the journey that led to me being here and that B is the second oldest Halpogroup.
              Well, haplogroups are sort of constructs -- labels given to mutation patterns --which are used to identify genetic population patterns. Your predicted haplogroup of B is very rare outside of parts of Africa and this may be why you are not showing matches. Most of the folks submitting samples for testing are from western Europe, and haplogroup B is apparently very rare among European populations. Hopefully as the database expands and folks submit samples from other areas, some matches will turn up. If you are interested in "deep ancestry" beyond the traditional genealogical time frame of 15 generations, the deep clade test is useful in confirming your predicted haplogroup. If you have upgraded to 67 markers and are not showing matches, I doubt if additional upgrades will produce much new information at this point. If it were me, I would wait and see what matches show up as the database expands before ordering additional y-dna testing.

              Comment


              • #8
                Would it be worthwhile, do you think, to explore using a company that specializes in african DNA?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by macmom6 View Post
                  Would it be worthwhile, do you think, to explore using a company that specializes in african DNA?

                  Haplogroup B definitely is African. Which suggests that your patrilineal line is African. This is also the case for my grandfather. There is a website that I used to upload my grandfather's results called genetree.com. In my case I did not establish any significant contacts, but, I was able to identify that his results matched most closely with others from Cameroon. This was solely based on str comparison. The site is free of charge.

                  You may also want to consider joining a project on FTDNA, such as the African Project, there you can also compare your data against the other African ancestry participants.

                  You can have an autosomal test run to try and figure out what percentage is african- but it is still a bit inconclusive. I had my mother take that and it returned 40% african, 53% european, and 7% east asian. We still haven't figured out what the east asian part could be.

                  You definitely have options, and how exciting it must be for you to make this discovery!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I picked up on another site to look into from another response, smgf.org. I have registered there but have not yet had a chance to search their database. I will also look into the one you have suggested. My great, great grandmother never told anyone, to my knowlege or my Dad's, who her son's father was. She took the information with her to the grave. My dad told me his mother once saw Pop's birth certificate and no father was listed. On Martha's death certificate there is a name but it leads no where with no other information and it's not even a full name. Two initials and their surname. Thank you for all your help. It will be interesting to see where this goes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by macmom6 View Post
                      I picked up on another site to look into from another response, smgf.org. I have registered there but have not yet had a chance to search their database. I will also look into the one you have suggested. My great, great grandmother never told anyone, to my knowlege or my Dad's, who her son's father was. She took the information with her to the grave. My dad told me his mother once saw Pop's birth certificate and no father was listed. On Martha's death certificate there is a name but it leads no where with no other information and it's not even a full name. Two initials and their surname. Thank you for all your help. It will be interesting to see where this goes.
                      The other thing that might prove useful is to contact your closest matches, even if there are no exact matches. You could still easily be related to someone within "genealogical time" who is showing up at a genetic distance of 1 at the 25 marker level and assuming that the genetic distance does not change drastically when the upgrades come in. There could have been a surname change somewhere along the line or it could be a question of a group that adopted surnames fairly recently, in which case surnames would be of limited usefulness in determining relatedness. I have an exact match with a different surname and when I contacted him, I found out that he had people with my surname is his family line.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        No Exact Matches

                        First, It is uncommon not to have any exact matches at 12 markers
                        but not at 25. On your FTDNA personal results page, click on
                        Preferences and change from "compare within my surname group"
                        to "compare my matches across the entire FTDNA Data base."

                        I had no matches at all within my surname group better than 11/12
                        markers. I didn't have any exact matches at 25 even when compared against the entire data base until about three years ago. I have been with FTDNA since 2003 so you can see it was a considerable wait. About three years ago, an previously unknown
                        second cousin showed up as exact matches at 12 and 25 markers.
                        Then, last year, I got another with a McKown at 12 and 25 markers and 35/37 markers, 65/67 markers. This year we also got our 111 marker match at 105/111. The FTDNATip tool projects an
                        Most Recent Common ancestor (MTCA) in 1661.

                        The second cousin is descended from my great grandfather's younger brother and that can be documented via the US census.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by macmom6 View Post
                          I picked up on another site to look into from another response, smgf.org. I have registered there but have not yet had a chance to search their database. I will also look into the one you have suggested. My great, great grandmother never told anyone, to my knowlege or my Dad's, who her son's father was. She took the information with her to the grave. My dad told me his mother once saw Pop's birth certificate and no father was listed. On Martha's death certificate there is a name but it leads no where with no other information and it's not even a full name. Two initials and their surname. Thank you for all your help. It will be interesting to see where this goes.
                          Haha!

                          The same issue revolved around my mother's birth certificates. Yes, she has two of them. On one, she has no surname and her father's race is scratched out. On the second one, she has her father's surname and his race is clearly defined. Not to mention, she was born out of wedlock....... She still has much difficulty in dealing not with the issue of ethnicity, but in her and her brother (same mother and father) being given up to a foster family.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by William McCown View Post
                            First, It is uncommon not to have any exact matches at 12 markers
                            but not at 25. On your FTDNA personal results page, click on
                            Preferences and change from "compare within my surname group"
                            to "compare my matches across the entire FTDNA Data base."

                            I had no matches at all within my surname group better than 11/12
                            markers. I didn't have any exact matches at 25 even when compared against the entire data base until about three years ago. I have been with FTDNA since 2003 so you can see it was a considerable wait. About three years ago, an previously unknown
                            second cousin showed up as exact matches at 12 and 25 markers.
                            Then, last year, I got another with a McKown at 12 and 25 markers and 35/37 markers, 65/67 markers. This year we also got our 111 marker match at 105/111. The FTDNATip tool projects an
                            Most Recent Common ancestor (MTCA) in 1661.

                            The second cousin is descended from my great grandfather's younger brother and that can be documented via the US census.
                            While it is uncommon, I think that there are more of us than one might think. For example, I tested with FTDNA in 2007/8 and I have a grand total of 3 exact matches at 12 markers and none beyond that (I have had 67 markers tested) and not to mention, I am the ultra vanilla R1b- L21. It has me questioning the validity of the scientific process overall, not because I know that they are missing something, but because I cannot figure out why I cannot have a match.

                            I think that the OP being in Hg B might bear similar results and it can be very frustrating, but we have to find alternative ways of seeking our answers.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Okay, here's an interesting twist. According to FTDNA we are in PREDICTED halpogroub B. According to Genetree-and I double checked my data entry skills-we're in halpogroup AJ. So, can anybody help me out with this one? I did choose FTDNA as the lab.

                              Comment

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